24 Works

Data from: Parameterizing the robust design in the BUGS language: lifetime carry‐over effects of environmental conditions during growth on a long‐lived bird

Thomas V. Riecke, Alan G. Leach, Dan Gibson & James S. Sedinger
1. Since the initial development of the robust design, this capture‐recapture model structure has been modified to estimate temporary emigration, and expanded to include auxiliary information such as band recovery and live resight data using maximum likelihood approaches. These developments have allowed investigators to separately assess individual and group effects on true survival, site fidelity, and temporary emigration. Additionally, recent advances in the BUGS language have allowed researchers to develop increasingly complex, user‐specified models in...

Data from: Proximity to canopy mediates changes in the defensive chemistry and herbivore loads of an understory tropical shrub, Piper kelleyi

Andrea E. Glassmire, Casey Philbin, Lora A. Richards, Christopher S. Jeffrey, Joshua S. Snook & Lee A. Dyer
Phytochemical traits are a key component of plant defense theory. Chemical ecology has been biased towards studying effects of individual metabolites even though effective plant defenses are comprised of diverse mixtures of metabolites. We tested the phytochemical landscape hypothesis, positing that trophic interactions are contingent upon their spatial location across a phytochemically diverse landscape. Specifically, intraspecific phytochemical changes associated with vertical strata in forests were hypothesized to affect herbivore communities of the neotropical shrub Piper...

Data from: Restoring dryland old fields with native shrubs and grasses: does facilitation and seed source matter?

Shauna M. Uselman, Jay Davison, Owen W Baughman, Benjamin W. Sullivan, W. Wally Miller, Elizabeth A. Leger & Owen W. Baughman
Restoration of agricultural fields is challenging, especially in arid and semi-arid ecosystems. We conducted experiments in two fields in the Great Basin, USA, which differed in cultivation history and fertility. We tested the effects of different levels of functional diversity (planting grasses and shrubs together, vs. planting shrubs alone), seed source (cultivars, local or distant wild-collections), and irrigation regime (spring or fall and spring) on restoration outcomes. We sowed either: 1) grasses and shrubs in...

Data from: A pollen fatty acid enhances learning and survival in bumblebees

Felicity Muth, Phillip R. Breslow, Pavel Masek & Anne S. Leonard
Learning associations between food-related stimuli and nutrients allows foragers to collect resources efficiently. In turn, the nutrients foragers consume can themselves affect learning performance, through innate preferences for pre-ingestive stimuli, as well as post-ingestive reinforcement. Bees are insect models of learning and memory, yet the vast majority of this research concerns nectar (carbohydrate) rather than pollen (protein/lipid) rewards, despite the fact that many bees collect both simultaneously. We asked how one component of pollen surface...

Data from: The genetic legacy of 50 years of desert bighorn sheep translocations

Joshua P. Jahner, Marjorie D. Matocq, Jason L. Malaney, Mike Cox, Peregrine Wolff, Mitchell A. Gritts & Thomas L. Parchman
Conservation biologists have increasingly used translocations to mitigate population declines and restore locally extirpated populations. Genetic data can guide the selection of source populations for translocations and help evaluate restoration success. Bighorn sheep (Ovis canadensis) are a managed big game species that suffered widespread population extirpations across western North America throughout the early 1900’s. Subsequent translocation programs have successfully re-established many formally extirpated bighorn herds, but most of these programs pre-date genetically-informed management practices. The...

Data from: Fully automated sequence alignment methods are comparable to, and much faster than, traditional methods in large data sets: an example with hepatitis B virus

Therese A. Catanach, Andrew D. Sweet, Nam-Phuong D. Nguyen, Rhiannon M. Peery, Andrew H. Debevec, Andrea K. Thomer, Amanda C. Owings, Bret M. Boyd, Aron D. Katz, Felipe N. Soto-Adames & Julie M. Allen
Aligning sequences for phylogenetic analysis (multiple sequence alignment; MSA) is an important, but increasingly computationally expensive step with the recent surge in DNA sequence data. Much of this sequence data is publicly available, but can be extremely fragmentary (i.e., a combination of full genomes and genomic fragments), which can compound the computational issues related to MSA. Traditionally, alignments are produced with automated algorithms and then checked and/or corrected “by eye” prior to phylogenetic inference. However,...

Data from: Resource stability and geographic isolation are associated with genome divergence in western Palearctic crossbills

Thomas L. Parchman, Pim Edelaar, Kathryn Uckele, Eduardo T. Mezquida, Daniel Alonso, Joshua P. Jahner, Ron W. Summers & Craig W. Benkman
While many conifers produce annually variable seed crops, serotinous species (which hold seeds in cones for multiple years) represent unusually stable food resources for seed predators. Such stability is conducive to residency and potentially population divergence of consumers as exemplified by the Cassia crossbill (Loxia sinesciuris) in North America. We used genotyping-by-sequencing to test whether three Mediterranean subspecies of common crossbills (L. curvirostra) associated with the serotinous Aleppo pine (Pinus halepensis) were more genetically distinct...

Data from: A heritable symbiont and host-associated factors shape fungal endophyte communities across spatial scales

Joshua G. Harrison, Thomas L. Parchman, Daniel Cook, Dale R. Gardner & Matthew L. Forister
1. Although microbial ecologists are intensely interested in the processes governing microbial community assembly, progress has been limited by a lack of studies that span multiple geographical scales and levels of biological organization. 2. We used high throughput sequencing to characterize foliar fungal endophyte communities and host plant genetic structure both within, and among, 24 populations of spotted locoweed (Astragalus lentiginosus) across the Great Basin Desert. 3. Across the Great Basin, both within, and among...

Data from: Impacts of inference method and dataset filtering on phylogenomic resolution in a rapid radiation of ground squirrels (Xerinae: Marmotini)

Bryan S. McLean, Kayce C. Bell, Julia M. Allen, Kristofer M. Helgen, Joseph A. Cook & Julie M Allen
Phylogenomic datasets are illuminating many areas of the Tree of Life. However, the large size of these datasets alone may be insufficient to resolve problematic nodes in the most rapid evolutionary radiations, because inferences in zones of extraordinarily low phylogenetic signal can be sensitive to the model and method of inference, as well as the information content of loci employed. We used a dataset of >3,950 ultraconserved element (UCE) loci from a classic mammalian radiation,...

Hydrology, geochemistry, and microbiology data from meter-scale infiltration experiments exploring the impact of a woodchip soil amendment on nitrate removal during infiltration

Sarah Beganskas, Galen Gorski, Tess Weathers, Andrew Fisher, Calla Schmidt, Chad Saltikov, Kaitlyn Redford, Brendon Stoneburner, Ryan Harmon & Walker Weir
We present results from field experiments linking hydrology, geochemistry, and microbiology during infiltration at a field site that is used for managed aquifer recharge (MAR). These experiments measured how a horizontal permeable reactive barrier (PRB) made of woodchips impacted subsurface nitrate removal and microbial ecology. Concentrations of dissolved organic carbon consistently increased in infiltrating water below the PRB, but not in un-amended native soil. The average nitrate removal rate in soils below the PRB was...

Data from: Leaf-cutter ants engineer large nitrous oxide hot spots in tropical forests

Fiona M. Soper, Benjamin W. Sullivan, Brooke B. Osborne, Alanna N. Shaw, Laurent Philippot & Cory C. Cleveland
Though tropical forest ecosystems are among the largest natural sources of the potent greenhouse gas nitrous oxide (N2O), the spatial distribution of emissions across landscapes is often poorly resolved. Leaf-cutter ants (LCA, Atta and Acromyrmex, Myrmicinae) are dominant herbivores throughout Central and South America and influence multiple aspects of forest structure and function. In particular, their foraging creates spatial heterogeneity by concentrating large quantities of organic matter (including nitrogen, N) from the surrounding canopy into...

Data from: Indirect effects of a large mammalian herbivore on small mammal populations: context-dependent variation across habitat types, mammal species and seasons

Taylor D. Ellis & J. Hall Cushman
Multiple consumer species frequently co-occur in the same landscape and, through effects on surrounding environments, can interact in direct and indirect ways. These interactions can vary in occurrence and importance, and focusing on this variation is critical for understanding the dynamics of interactions among consumers. Large mammalian herbivores are important engineers of ecosystems worldwide, have substantial impacts on vegetation and can indirectly affect small-mammal populations. However, the degree to which such indirect effects vary within...

Data from: Vertical differentiation in tropical forest butterflies: a novel mechanism generating insect diversity?

Chris C. Nice, James A. Fordyce, Katherine L. Bell, Matthew L. Forister, Zachariah Gompert & Phil J. DeVries
Many tropical fruit-feeding nymphalid butterflies are associated with either the forest canopy or the understory, however, the exceptions offer insights into the origins of tropical diversity. As it occurs in both habitats of tropical forests in Ecuador and Peru, Archaeoprepona demophon is one such exception. We compared patterns of occurrence of A. demophon in the canopy and understory and population genomic variation for evidence of ecological and genetic differentiation between habitats. We found that butterfly...

Data from: Mass-independent maximal metabolic rate predicts geographic range size of placental mammals

Jack P. Hayes, Chris R. Feldman & Miguel B. Araújo
1.Understanding the mechanisms driving geographic range sizes of species is a central issue in ecology, but remarkably few rules link physiology with the distributions of species. Maximal metabolic rate (MMR) during exercise is an important measure of physiological performance. It sets an upper limit to sustained activity and locomotor capacity, so MMR may influence ability to migrate, disperse, and maintain population connectivity. Using both conventional ordinary least squares (OLS) analyses and phylogenetically generalized least squares...

Data from: Deconstruction of a plant-arthropod community reveals influential plant traits with nonlinear effects on arthropod assemblages

Joshua G. Harrison, Casey Philbin, Zach Gompert, Glen Forister, Leonardo Hernandez, Benjamin W. Sullivan, Ian Wallace, Lyra Beltran, Craig D. Dodson, Jacob S. Francis, Amie Schlageter, Oren Shelef, Su'ad Yoon, Matthew L. Forister, Ian S. Wallace, Su'ad A. Yoon, Zachariah Gompert, Casey S. Philbin, Leonardo Hernandez-Espinoza & Glen W. Forister
1. Studies of herbivores and secondary consumer communities rarely incorporate a comprehensive characterization of primary producer trait variation, thus limiting our understanding of how plants mediate community assembly of consumers. 2. We took advantage of recent technological developments for efficient generation of phytochemical, microbial, and genomic data to characterize individual alfalfa plants (Medicago sativa; Fabaceae) growing in an old-field, semi-naturalized state for 770 traits (including 753 chemical features). Using random forest modeling, we investigated the...

Data from: Genomic sequence capture of haemosporidian parasites: methods and prospects for enhanced study of host-parasite evolution

Lisa N. Barrow, Julie M. Allen, Xi Huang, Staffan Bensch & Christopher C. Witt
Avian malaria and related haemosporidians (Plasmodium, [Para]Haemoproteus, and Leucocytoozoon) represent an exciting multi-host, multi-parasite system in ecology and evolution. Global research in this field accelerated after 1) the publication in 2000 of PCR protocols to sequence a haemosporidian mitochondrial (mtDNA) barcode, and 2) the development in 2009 of an open-access database to document the geographic and host ranges of parasite mtDNA haplotypes. Isolating haemosporidian nuclear DNA from bird hosts, however, has been technically challenging, slowing...

Data from: Rarity does not limit genetic variation or preclude subpopulation structure in the geographically restricted desert forb Astragalus lentiginosus var. piscinensis

Joshua G. Harrison, Matthew L. Forister, Stephanie R. Mcknight, Erin Nordin & Thomas L. Parchman
Premise of the study: Characteristics of rare taxa include small population sizes and limited geographical ranges. The genetic consequences of rarity are poorly understood for most taxa. A small geographical range could result in reduced opportunity for isolation by distance or environment, thereby limiting genetic structure and variation, but few studies explore genetic structure at small spatial scales with sufficient resolution to test this hypothesis. Moreover, few comparative genetic studies exist among infrataxa differing in...

Data from: The predictability of genomic changes underlying a recent host shift in Melissa blue butterflies

Samridhi Chaturvedi, Lauren K. Lucas, Chris C. Nice, James A. Fordyce, Matt L. Forister, Zachariah Gompert & Matthew L. Forister
Despite accumulating evidence that evolution can be predictable, studies quantifying the predictability of evolution remain rare. Here, we measured the predictability of genome-wide evolutionary changes associated with a recent host shift in the Melissa blue butterfly (Lycaeides melissa). We asked whether and to what extent genome-wide patterns of evolutionary change in nature could be predicted (1) by comparisons among instances of repeated evolution, and (2) from SNP $\times$ performance associations in a lab experiment. We...

Data from: Host species, pathogens, and disease associated with divergent nasal microbial communities in tortoises

Chava L. Weitzman, Franziska C. Sandmeier & C. Richard Tracy
Diverse bacterial communities are found on every surface of macro-organisms, and they play important roles in maintaining normal physiological functions in their hosts. While the study of microbiomes has expanded with the influx of data enabled by recent technological advances, microbiome research in reptiles lags behind other organisms. We sequenced the nasal microbiomes in a sample of four North American tortoise species, and we found differing community compositions among tortoise species and sampling sites, with...

Data from: Whole-plant metabolic allocation under water stress

Fabiane M. Mundim & Elizabeth G. Pringle
Trade-offs between plant growth and defense depend on environmental resource availability. Plants are predicted to prioritize growth when environmental resources are abundant and defense when environmental resources are scarce. Nevertheless, such predictions lack a whole-plant perspective-they do not account for potential differences in plant allocation above- and belowground. Such accounting is important because leaves and roots, though both critical to plant survival and fitness, differ in their resource-uptake roles and, often, in their vulnerability to...

Data from: On the importance of having a good mother: maternal investment affects duckling mortality risk in wood ducks

Benjamin S. Sedinger, Christopher A. Nicolai, Kelley M. Stewart & Kelly M. Stewart
Most avian populations experience more variation in recruitment than adult survival, and twhich drives much of the change in population growth rates from year to year. In duck species, the probability of duckling survival is an important component of recruitment into the breeding population. We investigated how variation in maternal investment in offspring by nesting female wood duck Aix sponsa affected duckling mortality (1‐survival) to 60 days of age using capture‐mark‐recapture techniques. Our primary sample...

Data from: Spatiotemporal dynamics and genome-wide association analysis of desiccation tolerance in Drosophila melanogaster

Subhash Rajpurohit, Eran Gefen, Alan O. Bergland, Dmitri A. Petrov, Allen G. Gibbs & Paul S. Schmidt
Water availability is a major environmental challenge to a variety of terrestrial organisms. In insects, desiccation tolerance varies predictably over spatial and temporal scales and is an important physiological determinant of fitness in natural populations. Here, we examine the dynamics of desiccation tolerance in North American populations of Drosophila melanogaster using: 1) natural populations sampled across latitudes and seasons; 2) experimental evolution in field mesocosms over seasonal time; 3) genome-wide associations to identify SNPs/genes associated...

Data from: The mismatch in distributions of vertebrates and the plants that they disperse

Jacob W. Dittel, Christopher M. Moore & Stephen B. Vander Wall
Little is known about how mutualistic interactions affect the distribution of species richness on broad geographic scales. Because mutualism positively affects the fitness of all species involved in the interaction, one hypothesis is that the richness of species involved should be positively correlated across their range, especially for obligate relationships. Alternatively, if mutualisms are facilitative (e.g., involving multiple mutualistic partners), the distribution of mutualists should not necessarily be related, and patterns in species distributions might...

Data from: Genetic source-sink dynamics among naturally structured and anthropogenically fragmented puma populations

Kyle D. Gustafson, Roderick B. Gagne, T. Winston Vickers, Seth P.D. Riley, Christopher C. Wilmers, Vernon C. Bleich, Becky M. Pierce, Marc Kenyon, Tracy L. Drazenovich, Jeff A. Sikich, Walter M. Boyce & Holly B. Ernest
Fragmentation of wildlife populations is increasing on a global scale and understanding current population genetic structure, genetic diversity, and genetic connectivity is key to informing wildlife management and conservation. We genotyped 992 pumas (Puma concolor) at 42 previously developed microsatellite loci and identified 10 genetic populations throughout the states of California and Nevada, USA. Although some genetic populations had large effective population sizes, others were small and inbred. Genetic diversity was extremely variable (heterozygosity, uHe...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    24

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    24

Affiliations

  • University of Nevada Reno
    24
  • Utah State University
    3
  • University of Wyoming
    3
  • University of Tennessee at Knoxville
    2
  • University of California, Santa Cruz
    2
  • University of New Mexico
    2
  • Texas State University
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Adelaide
    1
  • Binghamton University
    1