20 Works

Data from: Effects of native bryophytes on exotic grass invasion across an environmental gradient

Andrew R. Kleinhesselink & J. Hall Cushman
Understanding the role that native biodiversity plays in controlling exotic species invasion is a critical goal in ecology. In terrestrial plant communities, most research has focused on the effects of native vascular plants on invasion by exotic vascular plants. However, in many ecosystems, native bryophytes and other non-vascular plants are common and can affect the establishment, survival and growth of vascular plants. A more complete picture of how native biodiversity affects exotic plant invasion, demands...

Data from: Strong patterns of intraspecific variation and local adaptation in Great Basin plants revealed through a review of 75 years of experiments

Owen W. Baughman, Alison C. Agneray, Matthew L. Forister, Francis F. Kilkenny, Erin K. Espeland, Rob Fiegener, Matthew E. Horning, Richard C. Johnson, Thomas N. Kaye, Jeffery Ott, John Bradley St. Clair & Elizabeth A. Leger
Variation in natural selection across heterogeneous landscapes often produces 1) among-population differences in phenotypic traits, 2) trait-by-environment associations, and 3) higher fitness of local populations. Using a broad literature review of common garden studies published between 1941 and 2017, we documented the commonness of these three signatures in plants native to North America’s Great Basin, an area of extensive restoration and revegetation efforts, and asked which traits and environmental variables were involved. We also asked,...

Data from: Changes in behavior are unable to disrupt a trophic cascade involving a specialist herbivore and its food plant

Madeleine G. Lohman, Thomas V. Riecke, Cheyenne R. Acevedo, Brian T. Person, Joel A. Schmutz, Brian D. Uher-Koch & James S. Sedinger
Changes in ecological conditions can induce changes in behavior and demography of wild organisms, which in turn may influence population dynamics. Black brant (Branta bernicla nigricans) nesting in colonies on the Yukon–Kuskokwim Delta (YKD) in western Alaska have declined substantially (~50%) since the turn of the century. Black brant are herbivores that rely heavily on Carex subspathacea (Hoppner's sedge) during growth and development. The availability of C. subspathacea affects gosling growth rates, which subsequently affect...

Data from: Assessing thermal adaptation using family-based association and FST-outlier tests in a threatened trout

Stephen J. Amish, Omar Ali, Mary Peacock, Michael Miller, Morgan Robinson, Seth Smith, Gordon Luikart & Helen Neville
Discovering genetic markers associated with phenotypic or ecological characteristics can improve our understanding of adaptation and guide conservation of key evolutionary traits. The Lahontan cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarkii henshawi) of the northern Great Basin Desert, USA, demonstrated exceptional tolerance to high temperatures in the desert lakes where it resided historically. This trait is central to a conservation hatchery effort to protect the genetic legacy of the nearly extinct lake ecotype. We genotyped full‐sibling families from...

Data from: Genomic evidence of genetic variation with pleiotropic effects on caterpillar fitness and plant traits in a model legume

Zachariah Gompert, Megan Brady, Farzaneh Chalyavi, Tara C. Saley, Casey S. Philbin, Matthew J. Tucker, Matthew L. Forister & Lauren K. Lucas
Plant-insect interactions are ubiquitous, and have been studied intensely because of their relevance to damage and pollination in agricultural plants, and to the ecology and evolution of biodiversity. Variation within species can affect the outcome of these interactions. Specific genes and chemicals that mediate these interactions have been identified, but studies of genome- or metabolome-wide intraspecific variation might be necessary to better explain patterns of host-plant use and adaptation in the wild. Here, we present...

Data from: Synthesizing the effects of large, wild herbivore exclusion on ecosystem function

Elizabeth S. Forbes, J. Hall Cushman, Deron E. Burkepile, Truman P. Young, Maggie Klope & Hillary S. Young
1. Wild large herbivores are declining worldwide. Despite extensive use of exclosure experiments to investigate herbivore impacts, there is little consensus on the effects of wild large herbivores on ecosystem function. 2. Of the ecosystem functions likely impacted, we reviewed the five most-studied in exclosure experiments: ecosystem resilience/resistance to disturbance, nutrient cycling, carbon cycling, plant regeneration, and primary productivity. 3. Experimental data on large wild herbivores’ effects on ecosystem functions were predominately derived from temperate...

Data from: Sperm competitive advantage of a rare mitochondrial haplogroup linked to differential expression of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation genes

Jeanne Zeh, Maya Zawlodzki, Melvin Bonilla, Eleanor Su-Keene, Michael Padua & David Zeh
Maternal inheritance of mitochondria creates a sex-specific selective sieve through which mitochondrial mutations harmful to males but not females accumulate and contribute to sexual differences in longevity and disease susceptibility. Because eggs and sperm are under disruptive selection, sperm are predicted to be particularly vulnerable to the genetic load generated by maternal inheritance, yet evidence for mitochondrial involvement in male fertility is limited and controversial. Here, we exploit the coexistence of two divergent mitochondrial haplogroups...

Data from: Increased soil temperature and decreased precipitation during early life stages constrain grass seedling recruitment in cold desert restoration

Jeremy J. James, Roger Sheley, Elizabeth Leger, Peter B. Adler, Stuart Hardegree, Elise Gornish & Matt Rinella
1. Seed-based restoration is one of the most difficult challenges for dryland restoration. Identifying environmental conditions that drive variation in seed and seedling mortality across similar restoration efforts could increase understanding of when and where restoration outcomes are likely to be favorable and identify new tools and strategies to improve outcomes. 2. We asked how variation in a suite of environmental predictors influenced germination, emergence, seedling establishment, and juvenile survival of four commonly sown perennial...

The evolutionary potential of an insect invader under climate change

Michael Logan, Ingrid Minnaar, Kaitlin Keegan & Susana Clusella-Trullas
Although the impacts of climate change and invasive species are typically studied in isolation, they likely interact to reduce the viability of plant and animal populations. Indeed, invasive species, by definition, have succeeded in areas outside of their native range and may therefore have higher adaptive capacity relative to native species. Nevertheless, the genetic architecture of the thermal niche, which sets a limit to the potential for populations to evolve rapidly under climate change, has...

Data from: Genetic evidence for species cohesion, substructure, and hybrids in spruce

Monia S.H Haselhorst, Thomas L Parchman & C. Alex Buerkle
The origin and history of species are shaped by various evolutionary dynamics, including their persistence in the face of potential gene flow from related taxa. In this study we use broad geographic and taxonomic sampling (2,219 individuals) to establish the distribution of species, hybrids, and cryptic genetic variation within the conifer genus Picea (spruce) across western North America. We demonstrate that the six species of spruce in this region are distinguishable based on their genetic...

The Bogert effect and environmental heterogeneity

Michael L. Logan, Jenna Van Berkel & Susana Clusella-Trullas
A classic question in evolutionary biology is whether behavioural flexibility hastens or hinders evolutionary change. The latter idea, that behavior reduces the number of environmental states experienced by an organism and therefore buffers that organism against selection, has been dubbed the “Bogert Effect” after Charles Bogert, the biologist who first popularized the phenomenon using data from lizards. The Bogert Effect is pervasive when traits like mean body temperature, which tend to be invariant across space...

Data from: Aridity Drives Spatiotemporal Patterns of Masting Across the Latitudinal Range of a Dryland Conifer

Andreas Wion, Peter Weisberg, Ian Pearse & Miranda Redmond
Masting, or the synchronous and irregular production of seed crops, is controlled by environmental cues and resource budgets. Increasing temperatures and shifting precipitation regimes may alter the frequency and magnitude of masting, especially in species that experience chronic resource stress. Yet the effects of a changing climate on seed production are unlikely to be uniform across populations, particularly those that span broad abiotic gradients. In this study, we assessed the spatiotemporal patterns of masting across...

Data from: Desiccation and rehydration of mosses greatly increases resource fluxes that alter soil carbon and nitrogen cycling

Mandy L. Slate, Benjamin W. Sullivan & Ray M. Callaway
1. Mosses often have positive effects on soil carbon and nitrogen cycling, but we know little about how environmentally determined cycles of desiccation and rehydration in mosses influence these processes. 2. In this context, we compared carbon and nitrogen in throughfall after precipitation passed through eight moss species that were either hydrated continuously or desiccated and rehydrated. Also, the throughfall of four moss species was added to soil and used to determine the net effect...

Data from: Integrated population models: bias and inference

Thomas V. Riecke, Perry J. Williams, Tessa L. Behnke, Daniel Gibson, Alan G. Leach, Benjamin S. Sedinger, Phillip A. Street & James S. Sedinger
Integrated population models (hereafter, IPMs) have become increasingly popular for the modeling of populations, as investigators seek to combine survey and demographic data to understand processes governing population dynamics. These models are particularly useful for identifying and exploring knowledge gaps within datasets, because they allow investigators to estimate biologically meaningful parameters, such as immigration and reproduction, that are uninformed by data. As IPMs have been developed relatively recently, model behavior remains relatively poorly understood. Much...

Data from: Cascading effects of mammalian herbivores on ground-dwelling arthropods: variable responses across arthropod groups, habitats and years

Eric M. Cecil, Marko J. Spasojevic & J. Hall Cushman
1. Large mammalian herbivores are well known to shape the structure and function of ecosystems worldwide and these effects can in turn cascade through systems to indirectly influence other animal species. A wealth of studies have explored the effects of large mammals on arthropods, but to date they have reported such widely varying results that generalizations have been elusive. Three factors are likely drivers of this variability: the widely varying life-history characteristics of different arthropod...

Spectral data for quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides) clones of different ploidy levels

B. Blonder, B.J. Graae, B. Greer, M. Haagsma, K. Helsen, R.E. Kapás, H. Pai, J. Rieksta, D. Sapena, C.J. Still & R. Strimbeck
Data comprise measurements of spectral reflectance for quaking aspen (Populus tremuloides Michx.) trees at a range of sites in southwestern Colorado near the town of Crested Butte. Spectra were measured in three different ways: hyperspectral measurements of leaves, hyperspectral measurements of bark, and multispectral measurements of canopies. The first two measurements were made using a handheld spectrometer, while the latter were made via airborne imaging from an unmanned aerial system. In addition to these reflectance...

Data from: Modeling spatiotemporal abundance of mobile wildlife in highly variable environments using boosted GAMLSS hurdle models

Adam Smith, Benjamin Hofner, Juliet S. Lamb, Jason Osenkowski, Taber Allison, Giancarlo Sadoti, Scott McWilliams & Peter Paton
1. Modeling organism distributions from survey data involves numerous statistical challenges, including zero-inflation, overdispersion, and selection and incorporation of environmental covariates. In environments with high spatial and temporal variability, addressing these challenges often requires numerous assumptions regarding organism distributions and their relationships to biophysical features. These assumptions may limit the resolution or accuracy of predictions resulting from survey-based distribution models. 2. We propose an iterative modeling approach that incorporates a negative binomial hurdle, followed by...

Data from: Seed and seedling traits have strong impacts on establishment of a perennial bunchgrass in invaded semi-arid systems

Elizabeth A. Leger, Daniel Z. Atwater & Jeremy J. James
1. Many restoration projects use seeds to found new populations, and understanding phenotypic traits associated with seedling establishment in disturbed and invaded communities is important for restoration efforts worldwide. Focusing on the perennial grass Elymus elymoides, a native species common to sagebrush steppe communities in the Western United States, we asked if seed and seedling traits could predict field establishment. 2. We collected seeds from 34 populations from the western Great Basin. In greenhouse studies,...

Data from: Resource constraints highlight complex microbial interactions during lake biofilm development

Kevin H. Wyatt, Rody C. Seballos, Maria N. Shoemaker, Shawn P. Brown, Sudeep Chandra, Kevin A. Kuehn, Allison R. Rober & Steven Sadro
Abstract 1. This study evaluated how the availability of nutrients and organic carbon interact to influence the associations between autotrophic and heterotrophic microorganisms during lake biofilm development. Considering that decomposers are often better competitors for nutrients than producers in aquatic environments, we hypothesized that heterotrophs would outcompete autotrophs for available nutrients unless heterotrophs were limited by organic carbon provided by autotrophs. 2. To test our hypothesis, we evaluated autotrophic (algae) and heterotrophic (fungi, bacteria) biomass...

Estimating correlations among demographic parameters in population models

Thomas Riecke, Alan Leach, James Sedinger, Benjamin Sedinger & Perry Williams
Estimating correlations among demographic parameters is critical to understanding population dynamics and life-history evolution, where correlations among parameters can inform our understanding of life-history trade-offs, result in effective applied conservation actions, and shed light on evolutionary ecology. The most common approaches rely on the multivariate normal distribution, and its conjugate inverse Wishart prior distribtion. However, the inverse Wishart prior for the covariance matrix of multivariate normal distributions has a strong influence on posterior distributions. As...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Nevada Reno
    20
  • University of California, Davis
    3
  • University of Montana
    2
  • Agricultural Research Service
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • Stellenbosch University
    2
  • University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • Ball State University
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1