98 Works

What Did We Learn about VADs in 2019?

Maya Guglin
This is our 6th annual literature review on mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. Our previous reports for 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 were published as open access articles and were well received by the readers (1-5). In this paper, we summarize the most interesting and important, from our standpoint, publications from 2019. As we have done for the past two years, a section on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is included and primarily addresses new developments...

Data from: Non-invasive stratification of non-alcoholic fatty liver disease by whole-transcriptome cell-free mRNA characterization

Naga Chalsani, Shusuke Toden, John Sninsky, Richard Rava, Jerome Braun, Samer Gawrieh, Jiali Zhuang, Michael Nerenberg, Stephen Quake & Tara Maddala
Hepatic fibrosis stage is the most important determinant of outcomes in patients with non-alcoholic fatty liver disease (NAFLD). There is an urgent need for non-invasive tests that can accurately stage fibrosis and determine efficacy of interventions. Here we describe a novel cf-mRNA-Sequencing approach that can accurately and reproducibly profile low levels of circulating mRNAs and evaluate the feasibility of developing a cf-mRNA-based NAFLD fibrosis classifier. Using separate discovery and validation cohorts with biopsy-confirmed NAFLD (n=176...

A Case of HeartMate 3 Outflow Graft Twisting with Extraluminal Thrombosis: Is Computed Tomography Angiography Helpful?

Karim Saleb, Marianna Zagurovskaya, Michael Sekela & Maya Guglin
Twists in the outflow graft of the HeartMateTM 3 device (Abbott) have recently been described as a sporadic, late complication. We present a case with a unique combination of external compression of the HeartMate 3 outflow graft by a surgical scar compounded by thrombus formation in the space between the band relief and the outflow graft with associated twist of the outflow graft and severe flow limitation. Computed tomography angiogram (CTA) of the chest was...

2019 NSF Workshop on Connecting Large Facilities and Cyberinfrastructure

Ewa Deelman, Ilya Baldin, Brian Bockelman, Adam Bolton, Patrick Brady, Tom Cheatham, Laura Christopherson, Rafael Ferreira da Silva, Tom Gulbransen, Kate Keahey, Marina Kogan, Anirban Mandal, Angela Murillo, Jarek Nabrzyski, Valerio Pascucci, Steve Petruzza, Mats Rynge, Susan Sons, Dan Stanzione, Chaudhuri Surajit, Daryl Swensen, Alexander Szalay, Douglas Thain, John Towns, Charles Vardeman … & Jane Wyngaard

Spirituality of College Students: An Examination of Fraternity/Sorority Member and Non-Member Groups

Bradley M. Webb & John A. Mueller

Fraternity and Sorority New Members’ Self-Regulation of Alcohol Use

Andrew Wall, Janet Reis & Dan Bureau

Data from: Connecting the sun to flowering in sunflower adaptation

Benjamin K Blackman, Scott D Michaels & Loren H Rieseberg
Species living in seasonal environments often adaptively time their reproduction in response to photoperiod cues. We characterized the expression of genes in the flowering-time regulatory network across wild populations of the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus, that we found to be adaptively differentiated for photoperiod response. The observed clinal variation was associated with changes at multiple hierarchical levels in multiple pathways. Paralog-specific changes in FT homolog expression and tissue-specific changes in SOC1 homolog expression were associated...

Data from: Patterns of reproductive isolation in Nolana (Chilean Bellflower)

Cathleen Jewell, Amy Douglas Papineau, Rosanna Freyre & Leonie Clare Moyle
We examined reproductive isolating barriers at four postmating stages among 11 species from the morphologically diverse genus Nolana (Solanaceae). At least one stage was positively correlated with both genetic and geographic distance between species. Postzygotic isolation was generally stronger and faster evolving than postmating prezygotic isolation. In addition, there was no evidence for mechanical isolation or for reproductive character displacement in floral traits that can influence pollinator isolation. In general, among the potential isolating stages...

Data from: Shaping communicative colour signals over evolutionary time

Alison G. Ossip-Drahos, José R. Oyola Morales, Cuauhcihuatl Vital-Garcia, José Jaime Zúñiga-Vega, Diana K. Hews & Emilia P. Martins
Many evolutionary forces can shape the evolution of communicative signals, and the long-term impact of each force may depend on relative timing and magnitude. We use a phylogenetic analysis to infer the history of blue belly patches of Sceloporus lizards, and a detailed spectrophotometric analysis of four species to explore the specific forces shaping evolutionary change. We find that the ancestor of Sceloporus had blue patches. We then focus on four species; the first evolutionary...

Data from: What makes a multimodal signal attractive? A preference function approach

Kelly L. Ronald, Ruiyu Zeng, David J. White, Esteban Fernández-Juricic & Jeffrey R. Lucas
Courtship signals are often complex and include components within and across sensory modalities. Unfortunately, the evidence for how multimodal signals affect female preference functions is still rather limited. This is an important scientific gap because preference function shape can indicate which male traits are under the strongest selection. We modelled how preference function shape can be altered under 4 scenarios of varying signal content, including both redundant and non-redundant signals. The model was tested with...

Data from: Mate choice in the eye and ear of the beholder? Female multimodal sensory configuration influences her preferences

Kelly Ronald, Esteban Fernandez-Juricic, Jeffrey Lucas, Jeffrey R. Lucas & Kelly L. Ronald
A common assumption in sexual selection studies is that receivers decode signal information similarly. However, receivers may vary in how they rank signallers if signal perception varies with an individual’s sensory configuration. Furthermore, receivers may vary in their weighting of different elements of multimodal signals based on their sensory configuration. This could lead to complex levels of selection on signalling traits. We tested whether multimodal sensory configuration could affect preferences for multimodal signals. We used...

Novel plant-microbe interactions: rapid evolution of a legume-rhizobium mutualism in restored prairies

Susan Magnoli & Jennifer Lau
1. When plants colonize new habitats, the novel interactions they form with new mutualists or enemies can immediately affect plant performance. These novel interactions also may provoke rapid evolutionary responses and can be ideal scenarios for investigating how species interactions influence plant evolution. 2. To explore how mutualists influence the evolution of colonizing plant populations, we capitalized on an experiment in which two former agricultural fields were seeded with identical prairie seed mixes in 2010....

Data from: Little giants: a rapidly invading seagrass alters ecosystem functioning relative to native foundation species

Ranjan Muthukrishnan, Kelcie L. Chiquillo, Candice Cross, Peggy Fong, Thomas Kelley, C. Anna Toline, Regina Zweng & Demian A. Willette
The spread of invasive species is a major component of global ecological change and how and when to manage particular species is a diicult empirical question. Ideally, these decisions should be based on the speciic impacts of invading species including both their efects on native competitors and how they may or may not play similar roles in broader ecosystem functioning. Halophila stipulacea is an invasive seagrass currently spreading through the Caribbean, and as seagrasses are...

Evolution in novel environments: do restored prairie populations experience strong selection?

Susan Magnoli & Jennifer Lau
When populations colonize new habitats, they are likely to experience novel environmental conditions, and as a consequence may experience strong selection. While selection and the resulting evolutionary responses may have important implications for establishment success in colonizing populations, few studies have estimated selection in such scenarios. Here we examined evidence of selection in recently established plant populations in two prairie restorations in close proximity (< 15 km apart) using two approaches: 1) we tested for...

The sunflower (Helianthus annuusL.) genome reflects a recent history of biased accumulation of transposable elements

S. Evan Staton, Bradley H. Bakken, Benjamin K. Blackman, Mark A. Chapman, Nolan C. Kane, Shunxue Tang, Mark C. Ungerer, Steven J. Knapp, Loren H. Rieseberg & John M. Burke
Aside from polyploidy, transposable elements are the major drivers of genome size increases in plants. Thus, understanding the diversity and evolutionary dynamics of transposable elements in sunflower (Helianthus annuus L.), especially given its large genome size (∼3.5 Gb) and the well‐documented cases of amplification of certain transposons within the genus, is of considerable importance for understanding the evolutionary history of this emerging model species. By analyzing approximately 25% of the sunflower genome from random sequence...

Parasite exposure and host susceptibility jointly drive the emergence of epidemics

Tara Stewart Merrill, Spencer Hall & Carla Cáceres
Parasite transmission is thought to depend on both parasite exposure and host susceptibility to infection; however, the relative contribution of these two factors to epidemics remains unclear. We used interactions between an aquatic host and its fungal parasite to evaluate how parasite exposure and host susceptibility interact to drive epidemics. In six lakes, we tracked the following factors from pre-epidemic to epidemic emergence: 1) parasite exposure (measured observationally as fungal spores attacking wild-caught hosts), 2)...

Shedding light on environmentally transmitted parasites: darker conditions within lakes promote larger epidemics

Clara Shaw, Spencer Hall, Erin Overholt, Carla Cáceres, Craig Williamson & Meghan Duffy
Parasite fitness depends on a successful journey from one host to another. For parasites that are transmitted environmentally, abiotic conditions might modulate the success of this journey. Here we evaluate how light, a key abiotic factor, influences spatiotemporal patterns of zooplankton disease where light varies seasonally, across lakes, and with depth in a lake. In an in situ experiment using those three sources of variation, we tested sensitivity of spores of two parasites to ambient...

Conflicting signal in transcriptomic markers leads to a poorly resolved backbone phylogeny of Chalcidoid wasps

Junxia Zhang, Amelia R.I. Lindsey, Ralph S. Peters, John M. Heraty, Keith R. Hopper, John H. Werren, Ellen O. Martinson, James B. Woolley, Matt J. Yoder & Lars Krogmann
Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are a megadiverse superfamily of wasps with astounding variation in both morphology and biology. Most species are parasitoids and important natural enemies of insects in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we explored a transcriptome-based phylogeny of Chalcidoidea and found that poorly resolved relationships could only be marginally improved by adding more genes (a total of 5,591) and taxa (a total of 65), proof-checking for errors of homology and contamination, and decreasing missing data....

Data from: Early predictors of outcomes of hospitalization for cirrhosis and assessment of the impact of race and ethnicity at safety-net hospitals

, Samuel Akinyeye, Zachary Fricker, Moinuddin Syed, Eric Orman, Lauren Nephew, Eduardo Vilar Gomez, James Slaven, Naga Chalasani, Maya Balakrishnan, Michelle Long, Bashar Attar & Marwan Ghabril
Background. Safety-net hospitals provide care for racially/ethnically diverse and disadvantaged urban populations. Their hospitalized patients with cirrhosis are relatively understudied and may be vulnerable to poor outcomes and racial/ethnic disparities. Aims. To examine the outcomes of patients with cirrhosis hospitalized at regionally diverse safety-net hospitals and the impact of race/ethnicity. Methods. A study of patients with cirrhosis hospitalized at 4 safety-net hospitals in 2012 was conducted. Demographic, clinical factors, and outcomes were compared between centers...

Data from: Rapid evolution rescues hosts from competition and disease but—despite a dilution effect—increases the density of infected hosts

Alexander T. Strauss, Jessica L. Hite, Marta S. Shocket, Carla E. Cáceres, Meghan A. Duffy & Spencer R. Hall
Virulent parasites can depress the densities of their hosts. Taxa that reduce disease via dilution effects might alleviate this burden. However, ‘diluter’ taxa can also depress host densities through competition for shared resources. The combination of disease and interspecific competition could even drive hosts extinct. Then again, genetically variable host populations can evolve in response to both competitors and parasites. Can rapid evolution rescue host density from the harm caused by these ecological enemies? How...

A “Blinking” Left Ventricular Assist Device

Maya Guglin & Roopa Rao
Guglin M, Rao R. A ”Blinking” LVAD. The VAD Journal. 2020; 6(2):e2020627. https://doi.org/10.11589/vad/e2020627

Data from: Nanotransfection-based vasculogenic cell reprogramming drives functional recovery in a mouse model of ischemic stroke

Luke Lemmerman, Maria Balch, Jordan Moore, Diego Alzate-Correa, Maria Rincon-Benavides, Ana Salazar-Puerta, Surya Gnyawali, Hallie Harris, William Lawrence, Lilibeth Ortega-Pineda, Lauren Wilch, Ian Risser, Aidan Maxwell, Silvia Duarte-Sanmiguel, Daniel Dodd, Gina Guio-Vega, Dana McTigue, William Arnold, Shahid Nimjee, Chandan Sen, Savita Khanna, Cameron Rink, Natalia Higuita-Castro & Daniel Gallego-Perez
Ischemic stroke causes vascular and neuronal tissue deficiencies that could lead to significant functional impairment and/or death. Although progenitor-based vasculogenic cell therapies have shown promise as a potential rescue strategy following ischemic stroke, current approaches face major hurdles. Here we used fibroblasts nanotransfected with Etv2, Foxc2, and Fli1 (EFF), to drive reprogramming-based vasculogenesis, intracranially, as a potential therapy for ischemic stroke. Perfusion analyses suggest that intracranial delivery of EFF-nanotransfected fibroblasts led to a dose-dependent increase...

Data from: Population genomics of wild and laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Andrew R Whiteley, Anuradha Bhat, Emilia P Martins, Richard L Mayden, M Arunachalam, Silva Uusi-Heikkilä, A.T.A. Ahmed, Jiwan Shrestha, Matthew Clark, Derek Stemple & Louis Bernatchez
Understanding a wider range of genotype-phenotype associations can be achieved through ecological and evolutionary studies of traditional laboratory models. Here, we conducted the first large-scale geographic analysis of genetic variation within and among wild zebrafish (Danio rerio) populations occurring in Nepal, India, and Bangladesh and we genetically compared wild populations to several commonly used lab strains. We examined genetic variation at 1,832 polymorphic EST-based SNPs and the cytb mitochondrial gene in 13 wild populations and...

Data from: Reconciling extremely strong barriers with high levels of gene exchange in annual sunflowers

Julianno Bergoch Monteiro Sambatti, Jared L. Strasburg, Daniel Ortiz-Barrientos, Eric J. Baack & Loren Henry Rieseberg
In several cases, estimates of gene flow between species appears to be higher than predicted given the strength of interspecific barriers. However, as far as we are aware, detailed measurements of reproductive isolation have not previously been compared with a coalescent-based assessment of gene flow. Here, we contrast these two measures in two species of sunflower, Helianthus annuus and Helianthus petiolaris. We quantified the total reproductive barrier strength between these species by compounding the contributions...

Data from: The effect of variable frequency of sexual reproduction on the genetic structure of natural populations of a cyclical parthenogen

Desiree E. Allen & Michael Lynch
Cyclical parthenogens are a valuable system in which to empirically test theoretical predictions as to the genetic consequences of sexual reproduction in natural populations, particularly if the frequency of sexual relative to asexual reproduction can be quantified. In this study we utilized a series of lake populations of the cyclical parthenogen, Daphnia pulicaria, that vary consistently in their investment in sexual reproduction, to address the questions of whether the ecological variation in investment in sex...

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