114 Works

Light availability and rhizobium variation interactively mediate the outcomes of legume-rhizobium symbiosis

Katy Heath, Justin Podowski, Stephanie Heniff, Christie Klinger, Jennifer Lau, Wendy Yang, Dylan Weese & Patricia Burke
Premise of the study: Nutrients, light, water, and temperature are key factors limiting the growth of individual plants in nature. Mutualistic interactions between plants and microbes often mediate resource limitation for both partners. In the mutualism between legumes and rhizobia, plants provide rhizobia with carbon in exchange for fixed nitrogen. Because partner quality in mutualisms is genotype-dependent, within-species genetic variation is expected to alter the responses of mutualists to changes in the resource environment. Here...

Longitudinal white-matter abnormalities in sports-related concussion: a diffusion MRI study of the NCAA-DoD CARE Consortium

Yu-Chien Wu, Jaroslaw Harezlak, Nahla Elsaid, Zikai Lin, Qiuting Wen, Sourajit Mustafi, Larry Riggen, Kevin Koch, Andrew Nencka, Timothy Meier, Andrew Mayer, Yang Wang, Christopher Giza, John DiFiori, Kevin Guskiewicz, Jason Mihalik, Stephen LaConte, Stefan Duma, Steven Broglio, Andrew Saykin, Michael McCrea & Thomas McAllister
Objective To study longitudinal recovery trajectories of white-matter after sports-related concussion (SRC), we performed diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) on collegiate athletes who sustained SRC. Methods Collegiate athletes (n=219, 82 concussed athletes, 68 contact-sport controls, and 69 non-contact-sport controls) were included from the Concussion Assessment, Research and Education (CARE) Consortium. The participants completed clinical assessments and DTI at four time points: 24-48-hours post-injury, asymptomatic state, seven days following return-to-play, and six-months post-injury. Tract-based spatial statistics were...

Supplementary data for: Primate phylogenomics uncovers multiple rapid radiations and ancient interspecific introgression

Dan Vanderpool, Bin Quang Minh, Robert Lanfear, Daniel Hughes, Shwetha Murali, R. Alan Harris, Muthuswamy Raveendran, Donna M. Muzny, Richard A. Gibbs, Kim C. Worley, Jeffrey Rogers, Matthew W. Hahn, Mark S. Hibbins & Robert J. Williamson
Our understanding of the evolutionary history of primates is undergoing continual revision due to ongoing genome sequencing efforts. Bolstered by growing fossil evidence, these data have led to increased acceptance of once controversial hypotheses regarding phylogenetic relationships, hybridization and introgression, and the biogeographical history of primate groups. Among these findings is a pattern of recent introgression between species within all major primate groups examined to date, though little is known about introgression deeper in time....

Data from: A phylogeny for the Drosophila montium species group: a model clade for comparative analyses

William Conner, Emily Delaney, Michael Bronski, Paul Ginsberg, Timothy Wheeler, Kelly Richardson, Brooke Peckenpaugh, Kevin Kim, Masayoshi Watada, Ary Hoffmann, Michael Eisen, Artyom Kopp, Brandon Cooper & Michael Turelli
The Drosophila montium species group is a clade of 94 named species closely related to the model D. melanogaster species group. The montium species group is distributed over a broad geographic range throughout Asia, Africa, and Australasia. Species of this group possess a wide range of morphologies, mating behaviors, and endosymbiont associations, making this clade useful for comparative analyses. We use genomic data from 42 available species to estimate the phylogeny and relative divergence times...

Observational evidence of herbivore-specific associational effects between neighboring conspecifics in natural, dimorphic populations of Datura wrightii

Jay Goldberg, Sonya Sternlieb, Genevieve Pintel & Lynda Delph
Associational effects – in which the vulnerability of a plant to herbivores is influenced by its neighbors – have been widely implicated in mediating plant-herbivore interactions. Studies of associational effects typically focus on interspecific interactions or pest-crop dynamics. However, associational effects may also be important for species with intraspecific variation in defensive traits. In this study, we observed hundreds of Datura wrightii – which exhibits dimorphism in its trichome phenotype – from over 30 dimorphic...

Genotypic variation in an ecologically important parasite is associated with host species, lake, and spore size

Clara Shaw, Rebecca Bilich, Bruce O'Brien, Carla Cáceres, Spencer Hall, Timothy James & Meghan Duffy
Genetic variation in parasites has important consequences for host-parasite interactions. Prior studies of the ecologically important parasite Metschnikowia bicuspidata have suggested low genetic variation in the species. Here, we collected M. bicuspidata from two host species (Daphnia dentifera and Ceriodaphnia dubia) and two regions (Michigan and Indiana, USA). Within a lake, outbreaks tended to occur in one host species but not the other. Using microsatellite markers, we identified six parasite genotypes grouped within three distinct...

The evolutionary genetics of paternal care: how good genes and extra-pair copulation affect the trade-off between paternal care and mating success

Courtney Fitzpatrick, Colette Ciresi & Michael Wade
We investigate the evolution of a gene for paternal care, with pleiotropic effects on male mating fitness and offspring viability, with and without extra pair copulations (EPCs). We develop a population genetic model to examine how pleiotropic effects of a male mating advantage and paternal care are affected by ‘good genes’ and EPCs. Using this approach, we show that the relative effects of each on fitness do not always predict the evolutionary change. We then...

A Case of HeartMate 3 Outflow Graft Twisting with Extraluminal Thrombosis: Is Computed Tomography Angiography Helpful?

Karim Saleb, Marianna Zagurovskaya, Michael Sekela & Maya Guglin
Twists in the outflow graft of the HeartMateTM 3 device (Abbott) have recently been described as a sporadic, late complication. We present a case with a unique combination of external compression of the HeartMate 3 outflow graft by a surgical scar compounded by thrombus formation in the space between the band relief and the outflow graft with associated twist of the outflow graft and severe flow limitation. Computed tomography angiogram (CTA) of the chest was...

What Did We Learn about VADs in 2019?

Maya Guglin
This is our 6th annual literature review on mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices. Our previous reports for 2014, 2015, 2016, 2017, 2018 were published as open access articles and were well received by the readers (1-5). In this paper, we summarize the most interesting and important, from our standpoint, publications from 2019. As we have done for the past two years, a section on extracorporeal membrane oxygenation (ECMO) is included and primarily addresses new developments...

2019 NSF Workshop on Connecting Large Facilities and Cyberinfrastructure

Ewa Deelman, Ilya Baldin, Brian Bockelman, Adam Bolton, Patrick Brady, Tom Cheatham, Laura Christopherson, Rafael Ferreira da Silva, Tom Gulbransen, Kate Keahey, Marina Kogan, Anirban Mandal, Angela Murillo, Jarek Nabrzyski, Valerio Pascucci, Steve Petruzza, Mats Rynge, Susan Sons, Dan Stanzione, Chaudhuri Surajit, Daryl Swensen, Alexander Szalay, Douglas Thain, John Towns, Charles Vardeman … & Jane Wyngaard

Spirituality of College Students: An Examination of Fraternity/Sorority Member and Non-Member Groups

Bradley M. Webb & John A. Mueller

Fraternity and Sorority New Members’ Self-Regulation of Alcohol Use

Andrew Wall, Janet Reis & Dan Bureau

A “Blinking” Left Ventricular Assist Device

Maya Guglin & Roopa Rao
Guglin M, Rao R. A ”Blinking” LVAD. The VAD Journal. 2020; 6(2):e2020627. https://doi.org/10.11589/vad/e2020627

Data from: Connecting the sun to flowering in sunflower adaptation

Benjamin K Blackman, Scott D Michaels & Loren H Rieseberg
Species living in seasonal environments often adaptively time their reproduction in response to photoperiod cues. We characterized the expression of genes in the flowering-time regulatory network across wild populations of the common sunflower, Helianthus annuus, that we found to be adaptively differentiated for photoperiod response. The observed clinal variation was associated with changes at multiple hierarchical levels in multiple pathways. Paralog-specific changes in FT homolog expression and tissue-specific changes in SOC1 homolog expression were associated...

Data from: Rapid evolution rescues hosts from competition and disease but—despite a dilution effect—increases the density of infected hosts

Alexander T. Strauss, Jessica L. Hite, Marta S. Shocket, Carla E. Cáceres, Meghan A. Duffy & Spencer R. Hall
Virulent parasites can depress the densities of their hosts. Taxa that reduce disease via dilution effects might alleviate this burden. However, ‘diluter’ taxa can also depress host densities through competition for shared resources. The combination of disease and interspecific competition could even drive hosts extinct. Then again, genetically variable host populations can evolve in response to both competitors and parasites. Can rapid evolution rescue host density from the harm caused by these ecological enemies? How...

Data from: Shaping communicative colour signals over evolutionary time

Alison G. Ossip-Drahos, José R. Oyola Morales, Cuauhcihuatl Vital-Garcia, José Jaime Zúñiga-Vega, Diana K. Hews & Emilia P. Martins
Many evolutionary forces can shape the evolution of communicative signals, and the long-term impact of each force may depend on relative timing and magnitude. We use a phylogenetic analysis to infer the history of blue belly patches of Sceloporus lizards, and a detailed spectrophotometric analysis of four species to explore the specific forces shaping evolutionary change. We find that the ancestor of Sceloporus had blue patches. We then focus on four species; the first evolutionary...

Data from: What makes a multimodal signal attractive? A preference function approach

Kelly L. Ronald, Ruiyu Zeng, David J. White, Esteban Fernández-Juricic & Jeffrey R. Lucas
Courtship signals are often complex and include components within and across sensory modalities. Unfortunately, the evidence for how multimodal signals affect female preference functions is still rather limited. This is an important scientific gap because preference function shape can indicate which male traits are under the strongest selection. We modelled how preference function shape can be altered under 4 scenarios of varying signal content, including both redundant and non-redundant signals. The model was tested with...

Data from: Mate choice in the eye and ear of the beholder? Female multimodal sensory configuration influences her preferences

Kelly Ronald, Esteban Fernandez-Juricic, Jeffrey Lucas, Jeffrey R. Lucas & Kelly L. Ronald
A common assumption in sexual selection studies is that receivers decode signal information similarly. However, receivers may vary in how they rank signallers if signal perception varies with an individual’s sensory configuration. Furthermore, receivers may vary in their weighting of different elements of multimodal signals based on their sensory configuration. This could lead to complex levels of selection on signalling traits. We tested whether multimodal sensory configuration could affect preferences for multimodal signals. We used...

Data from: Patterns of reproductive isolation in Nolana (Chilean Bellflower)

Cathleen Jewell, Amy Douglas Papineau, Rosanna Freyre & Leonie Clare Moyle
We examined reproductive isolating barriers at four postmating stages among 11 species from the morphologically diverse genus Nolana (Solanaceae). At least one stage was positively correlated with both genetic and geographic distance between species. Postzygotic isolation was generally stronger and faster evolving than postmating prezygotic isolation. In addition, there was no evidence for mechanical isolation or for reproductive character displacement in floral traits that can influence pollinator isolation. In general, among the potential isolating stages...

Data from: Early predictors of outcomes of hospitalization for cirrhosis and assessment of the impact of race and ethnicity at safety-net hospitals

, Samuel Akinyeye, Zachary Fricker, Moinuddin Syed, Eric Orman, Lauren Nephew, Eduardo Vilar Gomez, James Slaven, Naga Chalasani, Maya Balakrishnan, Michelle Long, Bashar Attar & Marwan Ghabril
Background. Safety-net hospitals provide care for racially/ethnically diverse and disadvantaged urban populations. Their hospitalized patients with cirrhosis are relatively understudied and may be vulnerable to poor outcomes and racial/ethnic disparities. Aims. To examine the outcomes of patients with cirrhosis hospitalized at regionally diverse safety-net hospitals and the impact of race/ethnicity. Methods. A study of patients with cirrhosis hospitalized at 4 safety-net hospitals in 2012 was conducted. Demographic, clinical factors, and outcomes were compared between centers...

Conflicting signal in transcriptomic markers leads to a poorly resolved backbone phylogeny of Chalcidoid wasps

Junxia Zhang, Amelia R.I. Lindsey, Ralph S. Peters, John M. Heraty, Keith R. Hopper, John H. Werren, Ellen O. Martinson, James B. Woolley, Matt J. Yoder & Lars Krogmann
Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are a megadiverse superfamily of wasps with astounding variation in both morphology and biology. Most species are parasitoids and important natural enemies of insects in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we explored a transcriptome-based phylogeny of Chalcidoidea and found that poorly resolved relationships could only be marginally improved by adding more genes (a total of 5,591) and taxa (a total of 65), proof-checking for errors of homology and contamination, and decreasing missing data....

Data from: Little giants: a rapidly invading seagrass alters ecosystem functioning relative to native foundation species

Ranjan Muthukrishnan, Kelcie L. Chiquillo, Candice Cross, Peggy Fong, Thomas Kelley, C. Anna Toline, Regina Zweng & Demian A. Willette
The spread of invasive species is a major component of global ecological change and how and when to manage particular species is a diicult empirical question. Ideally, these decisions should be based on the speciic impacts of invading species including both their efects on native competitors and how they may or may not play similar roles in broader ecosystem functioning. Halophila stipulacea is an invasive seagrass currently spreading through the Caribbean, and as seagrasses are...

Shedding light on environmentally transmitted parasites: darker conditions within lakes promote larger epidemics

Clara Shaw, Spencer Hall, Erin Overholt, Carla Cáceres, Craig Williamson & Meghan Duffy
Parasite fitness depends on a successful journey from one host to another. For parasites that are transmitted environmentally, abiotic conditions might modulate the success of this journey. Here we evaluate how light, a key abiotic factor, influences spatiotemporal patterns of zooplankton disease where light varies seasonally, across lakes, and with depth in a lake. In an in situ experiment using those three sources of variation, we tested the sensitivity of spores of two parasites to...

Evolution in novel environments: do restored prairie populations experience strong selection?

Susan Magnoli & Jennifer Lau
When populations colonize new habitats, they are likely to experience novel environmental conditions, and as a consequence may experience strong selection. While selection and the resulting evolutionary responses may have important implications for establishment success in colonizing populations, few studies have estimated selection in such scenarios. Here we examined evidence of selection in recently established plant populations in two prairie restorations in close proximity (< 15 km apart) using two approaches: 1) we tested for...

Data from: Ecological and evolutionary significance of primates’ most consumed plant families

Jun Ying Lim, Michael D. Wasserman, Jorin Veen, Marie-Lynne Despres-Einspenner & W. Daniel Kissling
Angiosperms have been essential components of primate diet for millions of years, but the relative importance of different angiosperm families in primate diets and their influence on primate evolution and ecology remains unclear. Here, we assess the contribution and ecological and evolutionary significance of plant families to the diets of wild primates based on an unprecedented dietary dataset of over 8,000 dietary records, compiled from 140 primary sources encompassing 109 primate species. Out of the...

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