3 Works

Data from: Reduced drought tolerance during domestication and the evolution of weediness results from tolerance-growth trade-offs

Elizabeth Katherine Koziol, Loren H. Rieseberg, Nolan Coburn Kane & James D. Bever
The increased reproductive potential, size, shoot allocation, and growth rate of weedy plants may result from reduced resource allocation to other aspects of plant growth and defense. To investigate whether changes in resource allocation occurred during domestication or the evolution of weediness, we compared the mycorrhizal responsiveness, growth, and drought tolerance of nine native ruderal, nine agriculturally weedy (four US weedy and five Australian weedy), and fourteen domesticated populations (eight ancient landraces and six improved...

Data from: Patterns of reproductive isolation in Nolana (Chilean Bellflower)

Cathleen Jewell, Amy Douglas Papineau, Rosanna Freyre & Leonie Clare Moyle
We examined reproductive isolating barriers at four postmating stages among 11 species from the morphologically diverse genus Nolana (Solanaceae). At least one stage was positively correlated with both genetic and geographic distance between species. Postzygotic isolation was generally stronger and faster evolving than postmating prezygotic isolation. In addition, there was no evidence for mechanical isolation or for reproductive character displacement in floral traits that can influence pollinator isolation. In general, among the potential isolating stages...

Data from: Alternative paths to success in a parasite community: within-host competition can favor higher virulence or direct interference

Farrah Bashey-Visser, Hadas Hawlena & Curtis M. Lively
Selection imposed by coinfection may vary with the mechanism of within-host competition between parasites. Exploitative competition is predicted to favor more virulent parasites, while interference competition may result in lower virulence. Here, we examine whether exploitative or interference competition determines the outcome of competition between two nematode species (Steinernema spp.), which in combination with their bacterial symbionts (Xenorhabdus spp.), infect and kill insect hosts. Multiple isolates of each nematode species, carrying their naturally associated bacteria,...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Indiana University
    3
  • University of New Hampshire
    1
  • University of Florida
    1
  • Ben-Gurion University of the Negev
    1