4 Works

Data from: What makes a multimodal signal attractive? A preference function approach

Kelly L. Ronald, Ruiyu Zeng, David J. White, Esteban Fernández-Juricic & Jeffrey R. Lucas
Courtship signals are often complex and include components within and across sensory modalities. Unfortunately, the evidence for how multimodal signals affect female preference functions is still rather limited. This is an important scientific gap because preference function shape can indicate which male traits are under the strongest selection. We modelled how preference function shape can be altered under 4 scenarios of varying signal content, including both redundant and non-redundant signals. The model was tested with...

Data from: Rapid evolution rescues hosts from competition and disease but—despite a dilution effect—increases the density of infected hosts

Alexander T. Strauss, Jessica L. Hite, Marta S. Shocket, Carla E. Cáceres, Meghan A. Duffy & Spencer R. Hall
Virulent parasites can depress the densities of their hosts. Taxa that reduce disease via dilution effects might alleviate this burden. However, ‘diluter’ taxa can also depress host densities through competition for shared resources. The combination of disease and interspecific competition could even drive hosts extinct. Then again, genetically variable host populations can evolve in response to both competitors and parasites. Can rapid evolution rescue host density from the harm caused by these ecological enemies? How...

Data from: Habitat heterogeneity, host population structure and parasite local adaptation

Curtis M. Lively
Reciprocal-transplant experiments have proven to be a powerful tool for detecting local adaptation (LA). More recently, reciprocal cross-inoculation experiments have been used to evaluate adaptation by parasites to their local host populations. These experiments are conceptually similar to reciprocal-transplant experiments, except that the "environment" (the host population) may have evolved in response to changes in the parasite population. Here, I use analytical tools and computer simulations to determine when parasites would be expected to be...

Data from: Gene-tree reconciliation with MUL-trees to resolve polyploidy events

Gregg W.C. Thomas, S. Hussain Ather & Matthew W. Hahn
Polyploidy can have a huge impact on the evolution of species, and it is a common occurrence, especially in plants. The two types of polyploids - autopolyploids and allopolyploids - differ in the level of divergence between the genes that are brought together in the new polyploid lineage. Because allopolyploids are formed via hybridization, the homoeologous copies of genes within them are at least as divergent as orthologs in the parental species that came together...

Registration Year

  • 2017
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Indiana University
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  • Stanford University
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  • Wilfrid Laurier University
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  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Minnesota
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  • Purdue University
    1
  • Indiana University Bloomington
    1
  • University of Nebraska - Lincoln
    1