121 Works

South Australian Allied Health Rural Generalist Pathway Evaluation: Phase 1 Report

Alison Dymmott, Chris Brebner, Stacey George, Narelle Campbell, Julianne O'Connor, Jodie May & Silvana Poklar

Digital Education in the College of Humanities, Arts and Social Sciences: Discipline Discussions

Aidan Cornelius-Bell, Daria Tikhonova, Eric Bouvet, Susanne Schech, Mai Ngo, Eric Parisot, Javier Diaz-Martinez, James Kane & Helen Carter

Decision-Support Modelling viewed through the lens of Model Complexity

John Doherty & Catherine Moore

Model-Based Assessment of Coastal Aquifer Management Options. A GMDSI worked example report

Rui Hugman, John Doherty & Kathleen Standen

Data from: Tick exposure and extreme climate events impact survival and threaten the persistence of a long-lived lizard

Alice R. Jones, C. Michael Bull, Barry W. Brook, Konstans Wells, Kenneth H. Pollock & Damien A. Fordham
1. Assessing the impacts of multiple, often synergistic, stressors on the population dynamics of long-lived species is becoming increasingly important due to recent and future global change. 2. Tiliqua rugosa (sleepy lizard) is a long-lived skink (>30 years) that is adapted to survive in semi-arid environments with varying levels of parasite exposure and highly seasonal food availability. We used an exhaustive database of 30-years of capture-mark-recapture records to quantify the impacts of both parasite exposure...

Data from: Lean-season primary productivity and heat dissipation as key drivers of geographic body-size variation in a widespread marsupial

Rachel A. Correll, Thomas A. A. Prowse & Gavin J. Prideaux
Geographic body-size variation characterises many mammal species. Hypotheses centring around heat conservation, heat dissipation, primary productivity and seasonality have been advanced to explain geographic body-size patterns. However, identification of the primary body-size drivers has often been hampered by a paucity of data for broadly distributed species and the application of regression models that have not explicitly accounted for the spatial clustering inherent in such datasets. We used Australia's most widespread marsupial, the common brushtail possum...

Data from: Comparative ecological transcriptomics and the contribution of gene expression to the evolutionary potential of a threatened fish

Chris J. Brauer, Peter J. Unmack & Luciano B. Beheregaray
Understanding whether small populations with low genetic diversity can respond to rapid environmental change via phenotypic plasticity is an outstanding research question in biology. RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) has recently provided the opportunity to examine variation in gene expression, a surrogate for phenotypic variation, in non-model species. We used a comparative RNA-seq approach to assess expression variation within and among adaptively divergent populations of a threatened freshwater fish, Nannoperca australis, found across a steep hydroclimatic gradient...

Data from: Elevated HIV prevalence and risk behaviors among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam: a systematic review

Macarena García, Samantha Meyer & Paul Ward
Objectives: To review and analyze original studies on HIV prevalence and risk behaviours among men who have sex with men (MSM) in Vietnam. Design: Systematic literature review. Comprehensive identification of material was conducted by systematic electronic searches of selected databases. Inclusion criteria included studies conducted from 2002 onwards, following a systematic review concluding in 2001 conducted by Colby, Nghia Huu, and Doussantousse. Data analysis was undertaken through the application of both the Cochrane Collaboration and...

Radiation of tropical island bees and the role of phylogenetic niche conservatism as an important driver of biodiversity

James B Dorey, Scott SVC Groom, Elisha Freedman, Cale Matthews, Olivia K Davies, Ella Deans, Celina Rebola, Mark I Stevens, Michael SY Lee & Michael P Schwarz
Island biogeography explores how biodiversity in island ecosystems arises and is maintained. The topographical complexity of islands can drive speciation by providing a diversity of niches that promote adaptive radiation and speciation. However, recent studies have argued that phylogenetic niche conservatism, combined with topographical complexity and climate change, could also promote speciation if populations are episodically fragmented into climate refugia that enable allopatric speciation. Adaptive radiation and phylogenetic niche conservatism therefore both predict that topographical...

Data from: The morphology of the inner ear of squamate reptiles and its bearing on the origin of snakes

Alessandro Palci, Mark N. Hutchinson, Michael W. Caldwell & Michael S. Y. Lee
The inner ear morphology of 80 snake and lizard species, representative of a range of ecologies, is here analysed and compared to that of the fossil stem snake Dinilysia patagonica, using three-dimensional geometric morphometrics. Inner ear morphology is linked to phylogeny (we find here a strong phylogenetic signal in the data that can complicate ecological correlations), but also correlated with ecology, with Dinilysia resembling certain semi-fossorial forms (Xenopeltis and Cylindrophis), consistent with previous reports. We...

Data from: Rapid Pliocene adaptive radiation of modern kangaroos

Aidan M. C. Couzens & Gavin J. Prideaux
Differentiating between ancient and younger, more rapidly evolved clades is important for determining paleoenvironmental drivers of diversification. Australia possesses many aridity-adapted lineages, the origins of which have been closely linked to late Miocene continental aridification. Using dental macrowear and molar crown height measurements, spanning the past 25 million years, we show that the most iconic Australian terrestrial mammals, “true” kangaroos (Macropodini), adaptively radiated in response to mid-Pliocene grassland expansion rather than Miocene aridity. In contrast,...

Data from: Diversification across biomes in a continental lizard radiation

Lauren G. Ashman, Jason G. Bragg, Paul Doughty, Mark Norman Hutchinson, Sarah Bank, Nick Matzke, Paul M. Oliver, Craig Moritz, N. J. Matzke & P. Oliver
Ecological opportunity is a powerful driver of evolutionary diversification, and predicts rapid lineage and phenotypic diversification following colonisation of competitor-free habitats. Alternatively, topographic or environmental heterogeneity could be key to generating and sustaining diversity. We explore these hypotheses in a widespread lineage of Australian lizards: the Gehyra variegata group. This clade occurs across two biomes: the Australian monsoonal tropics (AMT), where it overlaps a separate, larger bodied clade of Gehyra and is largely restricted to...

Data from: Breakdown of phylogenetic signal: a survey of microsatellite densities in 454 shotgun sequences from 154 non model eukaryote species

Emese Meglécz, Gabriel Nève, Ed Biffin & Michael G. Gardner
Microsatellites are ubiquitous in Eukaryotic genomes. A more complete understanding of their origin and spread can be gained from a comparison of their distribution within a phylogenetic context. Although information for model species is accumulating rapidly, it is insufficient due to a lack of species depth, thus intragroup variation is necessarily ignored. As such, apparent differences between groups may be overinflated and generalizations cannot be inferred until an analysis of the variation that exists within...

Data from: Diversification rates and phenotypic evolution in venomous snakes (Elapidae)

Michael S. Y. Lee, Kate L. Sanders, Benedict King & Alessandro Palci
The relationship between rates of diversification and of body size change (a common proxy for phenotypic evolution) was investigated across Elapidae, the largest radiation of highly venomous snakes. Time-calibrated phylogenetic trees for 175 species of elapids (more than 50% of known taxa) were constructed using seven mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Analyses using these trees revealed no evidence for a link between speciation rates and changes in body size. Two clades (Hydrophis, Micrurus) show anomalously high...

Data from: Experimental manipulation suggests effect of polyandry but not mate familiarity on within-pair aggression in the social skink, Liopholis whitii

Thomas Botterill-James, Jacinta Silince, Tobias Uller, David G. Chapple, Michael G. Gardner, Erik Wapstra, Geoffrey M. While & Jacinta Sillince
Long-term monogamy is a key characteristic of family living across animals. The evolutionary maintenance of long-term monogamy has been suggested to be facilitated by increased reproductive coordination as a result of mate familiarity, leading to increased reproductive success. However, such effects can be compromised if females mate outside the pair bond (e.g. female polyandry), introducing conflicts of interest between the male and female. Here, we experimentally test the effects of both mate familiarity and female...

Data from: Genome-wide association study of an unusual dolphin mortality event reveals candidate genes for susceptibility and resistance to cetacean morbillivirus

Kimberley C. Batley, Jonathan Sandoval-Castillo, Catherine M. Kemper, Catherine R.M. Attard, Nikki Zanardo, Ikuko Tomo, Luciano B. Beheregaray & Luciana M. Möller
Infectious diseases are significant demographic and evolutionary drivers of populations, but studies about the genetic basis of disease resistance and susceptibility are scarce in wildlife populations. Cetacean morbillivirus (CeMV) is a highly contagious disease that is increasing in both geographic distribution and incidence, causing unusual mortality events (UME) and killing tens of thousands of individuals across multiple cetacean species worldwide since the late 1980’s. The largest CeMV outbreak in the Southern Hemisphere reported to date...

Data from: A critical evaluation of how ancient DNA bulk bone metabarcoding complements traditional morphological analysis of fossil assemblages

Alicia C. Grealy, Matthew C. McDowell, Paul Scofield, Dáithí C. Murray, Diana A. Fusco, James Haile, Gavin J. Prideaux & Michael Bunce
When pooled for extraction as a bulk sample, the DNA within morphologically unidentifiable fossil bones can, using next-generation sequencing, yield valuable taxonomic data. This method has been proposed as a means to rapidly and cost-effectively assess general ancient DNA preservation at a site, and to investigate temporal and spatial changes in biodiversity; however, several caveats have yet to be considered. We critically evaluated the bulk bone metabarcoding (BBM) method in terms of its: (i) repeatability,...

Data from: The dipnoan buccal pump reconstructed in 3D and implications for air breathing in Devonian lungfishes

Alice M. Clement, John A. Long, Paul Tafforeau & Per E. Ahlberg
Lungfishes are known for, and indeed take their name from, their bimodal respiratory abilities. All three extant genera can use their lungs to extract oxygen from the atmosphere, although their reliance upon this capability differs among taxa. Lungs are considered primitive for the Osteichthyes, however the distinctive buccal pump mode of air gulping exhibited by extant lungfishes appears to be a specialization. It is associated with a number of derived skeletal characters (cranial ribs, long...

Data from: Tip-dating and homoplasy: reconciling the shallow molecular divergences of modern gharials with their long fossil record

Michael S. Y. Lee & Adam M. Yates
Simultaneously analysing morphological, molecular and stratigraphic data suggests a potential resolution to a major remaining inconsistency in crocodylian evolution. The ancient, long-snouted thoracosaurs have always been placed near the Indian gharial Gavialis, but their antiquity (ca 72 Ma) is highly incongruous with genomic evidence for the young age of the Gavialis lineage (ca 40 Ma). We reconcile this contradiction with an updated morphological dataset and novel analysis, and demonstrate that thoracosaurs are an ancient iteration...

The impulse response of optic flow sensitive descending neurons to roll m-sequences

Karin Nordström, Richard Leibbrandt & Sarah Nicholas
When animals move through the world, their own movements generate widefield optic flow across their eyes. In insects, such widefield motion is encoded by optic lobe neurons. These lobula plate tangential cells (LPTCs) synapse with optic flow sensitive descending neurons, which in turn project to areas that control neck, wing and leg movements. As the descending neurons play a role in sensori-motor transformation, it is important to understand their spatio-temporal response properties. Recent work shows...

Finding what works: a resource for discovering interdisciplinary evidence-based information about stroke

Sarah Hayman, Jennifer Tieman, Brenton Kortman, Sheila Lennon, Kate Laver & Maria Crotty

Data from: Oxidative status and fitness components in the Seychelles warbler

Janske Van De Crommenacker, Martijn Hammers, Jildou Van Der Woude, Marina Louter, Peter Santema, David S. Richardson & Jan Komdeur
Oxidative damage, caused by reactive oxygen species during aerobic respiration, is thought to be an important mediator of life-history trade-offs. To mitigate oxidative damage, antioxidant defence mechanisms are deployed, often at the cost of resource allocation to other body functions. Both reduced resource allocation to body functions and direct oxidative damage may decrease individual fitness, through reducing survival and/or reproductive output. The oxidative costs of reproduction have gained much attention recently, but few studies have...

Data from: Habitat saturation promotes delayed dispersal in a social reptile

Ben Halliwell, Tobias Uller, David G. Chapple, Michael G. Gardner, Erik Wapstra & Geoffrey M. While
When and where offspring disperse has important implications for the evolutionary emergence and maintenance of group living. In non-cooperative breeders, direct benefits of delayed dispersal are relatively limited, suggesting that decisions regarding whether or not to remain in the parental territory are largely driven by the availability of suitable habitat in which to settle. While there is ample evidence of correlations between habitat saturation and delayed dispersal, experimental tests are rare, particularly for species with...

Data from: Did post-glacial sea-level changes initiate the evolutionary divergence of a Tasmanian endemic raptor from its mainland relative?

Christopher P. Burridge, William E. Brown, Jessica Wadley, Danielle L. Nankervis, Lindi Olivier, Michael G. Gardner, Cindy Hull, Robert Barbour & Jeremy J. Austin
Populations on continental islands are often distinguishable from mainland conspecifics with respect to body size, appearance, behaviour, or life history, and this is often congruent with genetic patterns. It is commonly assumed that such differences developed following the complete isolation of populations by sea level rise following the Last Glacial Maximum (LGM). However, population divergence may pre-date the LGM, or marine dispersal and colonisation of islands may have occurred more recently; in both cases, populations...

Data from: Isolation rearing does not constrain social plasticity in a family-living lizard

Julia L. Riley, Côme Guidou, Caroline Fryns, Johann Mourier, Stephan T. Leu, Daniel W.A. Noble, Richard W. Byrne, Martin J. Whiting & Daniel W A Noble
An animal’s social environment can be both dynamic and complex. Thus, social species often garner fitness benefits through being plastic in their social behavior. Yet, social plasticity can be constrained by an individual’s experience. We examined the influence of early social environment on social behavior in the tree skink (Egernia striolata), a family-living lizard. In the first phase of this study, we reared juveniles in two different social environments for 1.5 years: either in isolation...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    24
  • 2020
    15
  • 2019
    7
  • 2018
    24
  • 2017
    13
  • 2016
    9
  • 2015
    12
  • 2014
    6
  • 2013
    2
  • 2012
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    109
  • Text
    11
  • Other
    1

Affiliations

  • Flinders University
    121
  • South Australian Museum
    16
  • University of Adelaide
    14
  • Macquarie University
    9
  • University of Canberra
    9
  • University of Tasmania
    8
  • Australian National University
    7
  • Monash University
    6
  • Uppsala University
    6
  • University of Otago
    5