12 Works

Data from: A critical evaluation of how ancient DNA bulk bone metabarcoding complements traditional morphological analysis of fossil assemblages

Alicia C. Grealy, Matthew C. McDowell, Paul Scofield, Dáithí C. Murray, Diana A. Fusco, James Haile, Gavin J. Prideaux & Michael Bunce
When pooled for extraction as a bulk sample, the DNA within morphologically unidentifiable fossil bones can, using next-generation sequencing, yield valuable taxonomic data. This method has been proposed as a means to rapidly and cost-effectively assess general ancient DNA preservation at a site, and to investigate temporal and spatial changes in biodiversity; however, several caveats have yet to be considered. We critically evaluated the bulk bone metabarcoding (BBM) method in terms of its: (i) repeatability,...

Data from: The dipnoan buccal pump reconstructed in 3D and implications for air breathing in Devonian lungfishes

Alice M. Clement, John A. Long, Paul Tafforeau & Per E. Ahlberg
Lungfishes are known for, and indeed take their name from, their bimodal respiratory abilities. All three extant genera can use their lungs to extract oxygen from the atmosphere, although their reliance upon this capability differs among taxa. Lungs are considered primitive for the Osteichthyes, however the distinctive buccal pump mode of air gulping exhibited by extant lungfishes appears to be a specialization. It is associated with a number of derived skeletal characters (cranial ribs, long...

Data from: Diversification rates and phenotypic evolution in venomous snakes (Elapidae)

Michael S. Y. Lee, Kate L. Sanders, Benedict King & Alessandro Palci
The relationship between rates of diversification and of body size change (a common proxy for phenotypic evolution) was investigated across Elapidae, the largest radiation of highly venomous snakes. Time-calibrated phylogenetic trees for 175 species of elapids (more than 50% of known taxa) were constructed using seven mitochondrial and nuclear genes. Analyses using these trees revealed no evidence for a link between speciation rates and changes in body size. Two clades (Hydrophis, Micrurus) show anomalously high...

Data from: Tick exposure and extreme climate events impact survival and threaten the persistence of a long-lived lizard

Alice R. Jones, C. Michael Bull, Barry W. Brook, Konstans Wells, Kenneth H. Pollock & Damien A. Fordham
1. Assessing the impacts of multiple, often synergistic, stressors on the population dynamics of long-lived species is becoming increasingly important due to recent and future global change. 2. Tiliqua rugosa (sleepy lizard) is a long-lived skink (>30 years) that is adapted to survive in semi-arid environments with varying levels of parasite exposure and highly seasonal food availability. We used an exhaustive database of 30-years of capture-mark-recapture records to quantify the impacts of both parasite exposure...

Data from: Lean-season primary productivity and heat dissipation as key drivers of geographic body-size variation in a widespread marsupial

Rachel A. Correll, Thomas A. A. Prowse & Gavin J. Prideaux
Geographic body-size variation characterises many mammal species. Hypotheses centring around heat conservation, heat dissipation, primary productivity and seasonality have been advanced to explain geographic body-size patterns. However, identification of the primary body-size drivers has often been hampered by a paucity of data for broadly distributed species and the application of regression models that have not explicitly accounted for the spatial clustering inherent in such datasets. We used Australia's most widespread marsupial, the common brushtail possum...

Data from: An assessment of ancient DNA preservation in Holocene-Pleistocene fossil bone excavated from the world heritage Naracoorte Caves, South Australia

Alicia Grealy, Amy Macken, Morten E. Allentoft, Nicolas J. Rawlence, Elizabeth Reed & Michael Bunce
Although there is a long history of research into the fossil deposits of the Naracoorte Caves (South Australia), ancient DNA (aDNA) has not been integrated into any palaeontological study from this World Heritage site. Here, we provide the first evidence of aDNA preservation in Holocene- and Pleistocene-aged fossil bone from a deposit inside Robertson Cave. Using a combination of metabarcoding and shotgun next-generation sequencing approaches, we demonstrate that aDNA from diverse taxa can be retrieved...

Data from: On-shelf larval retention limits population connectivity in a coastal broadcast spawner

Peter R. Teske, Jonathan Sandoval-Castillo, Erik Van Sebille, Jonathan Waters, Luciano B. Beheregaray, LB Beheregaray &
Broadcast-spawning marine organisms with long pelagic larval duration are often expected to be genetically homogeneous throughout their ranges. When genetic structure is found in such taxa, it may be in the form of chaotic genetic patchiness: i.e. patterns that might seem independent of any underlying environmental variation. The joint analysis of population genetic data and marine environmental data can elucidate factors driving such spatial genetic diversity patterns. Using meso-scale sampling (at a scale of 10s...

Data from: When the going gets tough: behavioral type dependent space use in the sleepy lizard changes as the season dries

Orr Spiegel, Stephan T. Leu, Andy Sih, Stephanie S. Godfrey, C. Michael Bull & Andrew Sih
Understanding space use remains a major challenge for animal ecology, with implications for species interactions, disease spread, and conservation. Behavioural type (BT) may shape the space use of individuals within animal populations. Bolder or more aggressive individuals tend to be more exploratory and disperse further. Yet, to date we have limited knowledge on how space use other than dispersal depends on BT. To address this question we studied BT-dependent space-use patterns of sleepy lizards (Tiliqua...

Data from: Moa diet fits the bill: virtual reconstruction incorporating mummified remains and prediction of biomechanical performance in avian giants

Marie R. G. Attard, Laura A. B. Wilson, Trevor H. Worthy, Paul Scofield, Peter Johnston, William C. H. Parr & Stephen Wroe
The moa (Dinornithiformes) are large to gigantic extinct terrestrial birds of New Zealand. Knowledge about niche partitioning, feeding mode and preference among moa species is limited, hampering palaeoecological reconstruction and evaluation of the impacts of their extinction on remnant native biota, or the viability of exotic species as proposed ecological ‘surrogates'. Here we apply three-dimensional finite-element analysis to compare the biomechanical performance of skulls from five of the six moa genera, and two extant ratites,...

Data from: Female in-nest chatter song increases predation

Sonia Kleindorfer, Christine Evans & Katharina Mahr
Female song is an ancestral trait in songbirds, yet extant females generally sing less than males. Here, we examine sex differences in the predation cost of singing behaviour. The superb fairy-wren (Malurus cyaneus) is a Southern Hemisphere songbird; males and females provision the brood and produce solo song year-round. Both sexes had higher song rate during the fertile period and lower song rate during incubation and chick feeding. Females were more likely than males to...

Data from: Measurement of systemic mitochondrial function in advanced primary open-angle glaucoma and Leber hereditary optic neuropathy

Nicole J. Van Bergen, Jonathan G. Crowston, Jamie E. Craig, Kathryn P. Burdon, Lisa S. Kearns, Shiwani Sharma, Alex W. Hewitt, David A. Mackey & Ian A. Trounce
Primary Open Angle Glaucoma (POAG) is a common neurodegenerative disease characterized by the selective and gradual loss of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs). Aging and increased intraocular pressure (IOP) are glaucoma risk factors; nevertheless patients deteriorate at all levels of IOP, implying other causative factors. Recent evidence presents mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) complex-I impairments in POAG. Leber Hereditary Optic Neuropathy (LHON) patients suffer specific and rapid loss of RGCs, predominantly in young adult males, due to...

Data from: Ancestral state reconstruction, rate heterogeneity, and the evolution of reptile viviparity

Benedict King & Michael S. Y. Lee
Virtually all models for reconstructing ancestral states for discrete characters make the crucial assumption that the trait of interest evolves at a uniform rate across the entire tree. Although methods for identifying evolutionary rate shifts in continuous characters have attracted recent attention (e.g. Eastman et al., 2011, Stack et al., 2011), such methods for discrete characters have only very recently been developed (Beaulieu et al., 2013, Beaulieu and O’Meara 2014) and have yet to be...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    12

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    12

Affiliations

  • Flinders University
    12
  • University of Adelaide
    4
  • Murdoch University
    2
  • University of Otago
    2
  • Curtin University
    2
  • UNSW Sydney
    2
  • Canterbury Museum
    2
  • Lions Eye Institute
    1
  • University of Melbourne
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1