278 Works

Data from: Evaluating carbon storage, timber harvest, and habitat possibilities for a western Cascades (US) forest landscape

Jeffrey Kline, Mark Harmon, Thomas Spies, Anita Morzillo, Robert Pabst, Brenda McComb, Frank Schnekenburger, Keith Olsen, Blair Csuti, Jody Vogeler, Jeffrey D. Kline, Thomas A. Spies, Brenda C. McComb, Anita T. Morzillo, Mark E. Harmon, Robert J. Pabst, Keith A. Olsen & Jody C. Vogeler
Forest policymakers and managers have long sought ways to evaluate the capability of forest landscapes to jointly produce timber, habitat, and other ecosystem services in response to forest management. Currently, carbon is of particular interest as policies for increasing carbon storage on federal lands are being proposed. However, a challenge in joint production analysis of forest management is adequately representing ecological conditions and processes that influence joint production relationships. We used simulation models of vegetation...

Data from: Testing rangeland health theory in the Northern Great Plains

Kurt O. Reinhart, Matthew J. Rinella, Richard C. Waterman, Mark K. Petersen & Lance T. Vermeire
• Correctly assessing whether rangeland ecosystem services are stable, improving, or degrading is of global importance. Soil aggregate stability (SAS) is widely used to infer rangeland health, partly because high SAS is thought to reduce runoff by increasing infiltration. We studied the sensitivity of SAS to grazing and other disturbances, the effects of SAS on infiltration, and the utility of alternative indicators of infiltration in the Northern Great Plains.• To test grazing effects on SAS,...

Data from: Introgression between divergent corn borer species in a region of sympatry: implications on the evolution and adaptation of pest arthropods

Yangzhou Wang, Kyung Seok Kim, Wenchao Guo, Qiyun Li, Yunyue Zhang, Zhenying Wang & Brad S. Coates
The Asian corn borer, Ostrinia furnacalis, and European corn borer, O. nubilalis (Lepidoptera: Crambidae), cause damage to cultivated maize in spatially distinct geographies, and have evolved divergent hydrocarbons as the basis of sexual communication. The Yili area of Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region in China represents the only known region where O. furnacalis has invaded a native O. nubilalis range, and these two corn borer species have made secondary contact. Genetic differentiation was estimated between Ostrinia...

Data from: The tortoise and the hare: reducing resource availability shifts competitive balance between plant species

Dean E. Pearson, Yvette K. Ortega & John L. Maron
1.Determining how changes in abiotic conditions influence community interactions is a fundamental challenge in ecology. Meeting this challenge is increasingly imperative in the Anthropocene where climate change and exotic species introductions alter abiotic context and biotic composition to reshuffle natural systems. 2.We created plant assemblages consisting of monocultures or equal abundance of the native community dominant bluebunch wheatgrass (Pseudoroegneria spicata) and the exotic spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe), a co-occurring invasive forb that has overtaken grasslands...

Data from: The wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella (Acari: Eriophyoidea) is a complex of cryptic lineages with divergent host ranges: evidence from molecular and plant bioassay data

Anna Skoracka, Lechosław Kuczyński, Wiktoria Szydło & Brian Rector
Aceria tosichella (the wheat curl mite, WCM) is a global pest of wheat and other cereals, causing losses by direct damage, as well as the transmission of plant viruses. The mite is considered to have an unusually wide host range for an eriophyoid species. The present study tested the commonly held assumption that WCM is a single, highly polyphagous species by assessing the host range of genetically distinct lineages of WCM occurring in Poland on...

Data from: CO2 enrichment and soil type additively regulate grassland productivity

H. Wayne Polley, Michael J. Aspinwall, Harold P. Collins, Anne E. Gibson, Richard A. Gill, Robert B. Jackson, Virginia L. Jin, Albina R. Khasanova, Lara G. Reichmann & Philip A. Fay
Atmospheric CO2 enrichment usually increases aboveground productivity (ANPP) of grassland vegetation, but the magnitude of the ANPP-CO2 response differs among ecosystems. Soil properties affect ANPP via multiple mechanisms and vary over topographic to geographic gradients, but have received little attention as potential modifiers of the ANPP-CO2 response. We assessed effects of three soil types, sandy loam, silty clay, and clay, on the ANPP response of perennial C3/C4 grassland communities to a subambient to elevated CO2...

Data from: Competitive release and outbreaks of non-target pests associated with transgenic Bt cotton

Adam Ralph Zeilinger, Dawn M. Olson & David A. Andow
The adoption of transgenic Bt cotton has, in some cases, led to environmental and economic benefits through reduced insecticide use. However, the distribution of these benefits and associated risks among cotton growers and cotton-growing regions, has been uneven due in part to outbreaks of non-target or secondary pests, thereby requiring the continued use of synthetic insecticides. In the southeastern United States, Bt cotton adoption has resulted in increased abundance of and damage from stink bug...

Data from: Forest structure provides the income for reproductive success in a southern population of Canada lynx

Megan K. Kosterman, John R. Squires, Joseph D. Holbrook, Daniel H. Pletscher & Mark Hebblewhite
Understanding intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of reproductive success is central to advancing animal ecology and characterizing critical habitat. Unfortunately, much of the work examining drivers of reproductive success is biased toward particular groups of organisms (e.g., colonial birds, large herbivores, capital breeders). Long-lived mammalian carnivores that are of conservation concern, solitary, and territorial present an excellent situation to examine intrinsic and extrinsic drivers of reproductive success, yet they have received little attention. Here, we used...

Data from: Hybridization and invasion: an experimental test with diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa Lam.)

Amy C Blair, Dana Blumenthal & Ruth A Hufbauer
A number of studies have suggested a link between hybridization and invasion. In this study, we experimentally test the potential for hybridization to influence invasion through a greenhouse common garden study. Diffuse knapweed (Centaurea diffusa Lam.) was introduced to North America with admixture from spotted knapweed (Centaurea stoebe subsp. stoebe L.). Comparisons between North American diffuse knapweed (including hybrid phenotypes) and native (European) diffuse knapweed in a common garden did not reveal enhanced performance or...

Data from: Genetic differentiation associated with host plants and geography among six widespread species of South American Blepharoneura fruit flies (Tephritidae)

Kristina Ottens, Isaac S. Winkler, Matthew L. Lewis, Sonja J. Scheffer, Gessica A. Gomes-Costa, Marty A. Condon & Andrew A. Forbes
Tropical herbivorous insects are astonishingly diverse and many are highly host-specific. Much evidence suggests that herbivorous insect diversity is a function of host-plant diversity; yet, the diversity of some lineages exceeds the diversity of plants. Although most species of herbivorous fruit flies in the Neotropical genus Blepharoneura are strongly host-specific (they deposit their eggs in a single host plant species and flower sex), some species are collected from multiple hosts or flowers and these may...

Data from: Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

Lewis H. Ziska, Jeffery S. Pettis, Joan Edwards, Jillian E. Hancock, Martha B. Tomecek, Andrew Clark, Jeffrey S. Dukes, Irakli Loladze & H. Wayne Polley
At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca. However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis...

Data from: Niche differentiation and colonization of a novel environment by an asexual parasitic wasp.

Andrew A. Forbes, Laura A. Rice, Nicholas B. Stewart, Wee L. Yee & Maurine Neiman
How do asexual taxa become adapted to a diversity of environments, and how do they persist despite changing environmental conditions? These questions are linked by their mutual focus on the relationship between genetic variation, which is often limited in asexuals, and the ability to respond to environmental variation. Asexual taxa originating from a single ancestor present a unique opportunity to assess rates of phenotypic and genetic change when access to new genetic variation is limited...

Data from: Interactive effects of a non-native invasive grass Microstegium vimineum and herbivore exclusion on experimental tree regeneration under differing forest management

Daniel J. Johnson, S. Luke Flory, Angela Shelton, Cynthia Huebner & Keith Clay
1. Invasive plants, herbivores and site management history can play crucial roles in determining plant community composition. The net effects of invasive species on plant communities are well known, but we have a poor understanding of the relative contributions of direct competitive effects of invasive species and their interactions with herbivores and management practices. Understanding interactions among plant invasions, herbivores and management history is critical for predicting and managing long-term ecological effects of invasions on...

Data from: Leaf litter nutrient uptake in an intermittent blackwater river: influence of tree species and associated biotic and abiotic drivers

Andrew S. Mehring, Kevin A. Kuehn, Aaron Thompson, Catherine M. Pringle, Amy D. Rosemond, Matthew R. First, R Richard Lowrance & George Vellidis
1. Organic matter may sequester nutrients as it decomposes, increasing in total N and P mass via multiple uptake pathways. During leaf litter decomposition, microbial biomass and accumulated inorganic materials immobilize and retain nutrients, and therefore, both biotic and abiotic drivers may influence detrital nutrient content. We examined the relative importance of these types of nutrient immobilization and compared patterns of nutrient retention in recalcitrant and labile leaf litter. 2. Leaf packs of water oak...

Data from: Distance, flow, and PCR inhibition: eDNA dynamics in two headwater steams

Stephen F. Jane, Taylor M. Wilcox, Kevin S. McKelvey, Michael K. Young, Michael K. Schwartz, Winsor H. Lowe, Benjamin H. Letcher & Andrew R. Whiteley
Environmental DNA (eDNA) detection has emerged as a powerful tool for monitoring aquatic organisms, but much remains unknown about the dynamics of aquatic eDNA over a range of environmental conditions. DNA concentrations in streams and rivers will depend not only on the equilibrium between DNA entering the water and DNA leaving the system through degradation, but also on downstream transport. To improve understanding of the dynamics of eDNA concentration in lotic systems, we introduced caged...

Mixed ancestry from wild and domestic lineages contributes to the rapid expansion of invasive feral swine

Timothy Smyser, Michael Tabak, Chris Slootmaker, Michael Robeson, Ryan Miller, Mirte Bosse, Hendrik-Jan Megens, Martien Groenen, Samuel Paiva, Danielle Assis De Faria, Harvey Blackburn, Brandon Schmit & Antoinette Piaggio
Invasive alien species are a significant threat to both economic and ecological systems. Identifying processes that give rise to invasive populations is essential for implementing effective control strategies. We conducted an ancestry analysis of invasive feral swine (Sus scrofa, Linnaeus, 1758), a highly destructive ungulate that is widely distributed throughout the contiguous United States, to describe introduction pathways, sources of newly-emergent populations, and processes contributing to an ongoing invasion. Comparisons of high-density single nucleotide polymorphism...

Data from: The impact of prescribed burning on native bee communities (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) in longleaf pine savannas in the North Carolina sandhills

Heather Moylett, Elsa Youngsteadt & Clyde Sorenson
Prescribed burning is a common silvicultural practice used in the management of longleaf pine (Pinus palustris Mill.) savannas to reduce hardwood encroachment and ground cover and to maintain biodiversity. We investigated the response of the native bee community (Hymenoptera: Apoidea: Anthophila) in the Sandhills of North Carolina to prescribed burning on a three-year rotation over two consecutive years (2012 and 2013). We deployed bee bowl traps in sites that had been burned the year of...

Predicted distribution of a rare and understudied forest carnivore: Humboldt martens (Martes caurina humboldtensis)

Katie Moriarty, Joel Thompson, Matthew Delheimer, Brent Barry, Mark Linnell, Taal Levi, Keith Hamm, Desiree Early, Holly Gamblin, Micaela Szykman-Gunther, Jordan Ellison, Janet Prevey, Jennifer Hartman & Raymond Davis
Many mammalian species have experienced range contractions. Following a reduction in distribution that has resulted in apparently small and disjunct populations, the Humboldt marten (Martes caurina humboldtensis) was recently designated as federally Threatened and state Endangered. This subspecies of Pacific marten occurring in coastal Oregon and northern California, also known as coastal martens, appear unlike martens that occur in snow-associated regions in that vegetation associations appear to differ widely between Humboldt marten populations. We expected...

Towards a stable global Noctuidae (Lepidoptera) taxonomy

Kevin Keegan, Jadranka Rota, Reza Zahiri, Alberto Zilli, Niklas Wahlberg, B. Christian Schmidt, J. Donald Lafontaine, Paul Goldstein & David Wagner
The family Noctuidae is one of the world’s most diverse, ecologically successful, and economically important animal lineages; with over 12,000 species in ~1150 genera. We inferred a phylogeny based on eight protein-coding genes (>6,400 base pairs) for the global fauna, greatly expanding upon previous attempts to stabilize the higher classification of Noctuidae by sampling 70 of the 76 widely recognized family-group taxa: 20 of the 21 subfamilies, 32 of the 35 tribes, and 18 of...

Bee species differ in pollen deposition curves with consequences for gene flow

Johanne Brunet
Premise of the study Pollinator foraging behavior can influence pollen dispersal and gene flow. In many plant species a pollinator trips a flower by applying pressure to release its sexual organs. We propose that differences in tripping rate among grooming pollinators could generate distinct pollen deposition curves, the pattern of pollen deposition over successive flowers visited. This study compares the pollen deposition curves of two grooming pollinators, a social bumble bee and a solitary leafcutting...

Data from: Predicting functional responses in agro-ecosystems from animal movement data to improve management of invasive pests

Mark Wilber, Sarah Chinn, James Beasley, Raoul Boughton, Ryan Brook, Stephen Ditchkoff, Justin Fischer, Steve Hartley, Lindsey Holstrom, John Kilgo, Jesse Lewis, Ryan Miller, Nathan Snow, Kurt VerCauteren, Samantha Wisely, Colleen Webb & Kim Pepin
Functional responses describe how changing resource availability affects consumer resource use, thus providing a mechanistic approach to prediction of the invasibility and potential damage of invasive alien species (IAS). However, functional responses can be context-dependent, varying with resource characteristics and availability, consumer attributes, and environmental variables. Identifying context-dependencies can allow invasion and damage risk to be predicted across different ecoregions. Understanding how ecological factors shape the functional response in agro-ecosystems can improve predictions of hotspots...

Context-dependent variability in the population prevalence and individual fitness effects of plant-fungal symbiosis

Marion Donald, Teresa Bohner, Kory Kolis, Alan Shadow, Jennifer Rudgers & Tom Miller
1. Heritable symbionts, found within a diverse array of flora and fauna, are often observed at intermediate prevalence within host populations, despite expectations that positive fitness feedbacks should drive beneficial symbionts to fixation. Intermediate prevalence may reflect neutral dynamics of symbionts with weak fitness effects, transient dynamics of symbionts trending toward fixation (or elimination), or a stable intermediate outcome determined by the balance of fitness effects and failed symbiont transmission. Theory suggests these outcomes should...

Additive and non-additive responses of seedlings to simulated herbivory and drought data

Kasey Barton & Aaron Shiels
Drought is a global threat, increasing in severity and frequency throughout tropical ecosystems. Although plants often face drought in conjunction with biotic stressors, such as herbivory or disease, experimental studies infrequently test the simultaneous effects of drought and biotic stress. Because multiple simultaneous stressors may have non-additive and complex effects on plant performance, it is difficult to predict plant responses to multiple threats from research examining one stress at a time. Using an experimental approach...

Shortgrass steppe and northern mixedgrass prairie plant species traits

Dana Blumenthal, Julie Kray, Kevin Mueller & Troy Ocheltree
Despite progress in trait-based ecology, there is limited understanding of the plant traits that structure semiarid grasslands. In particular, it remains unclear how traits that enable plants to cope with water limitation are related to traits that influence other key functions such as herbivore defense and growth. The hypothesis that drought and herbivory exert convergent selection pressures is supported for morphological traits, but largely untested for struct­ural, physiological, and phenological traits. Drought and economic traits...

Relationships among wood-boring beetles, fungal endophytes and saprotrophs, and the decomposition of forest biomass.

James Skelton, Michelle Jusino, Paige Carlson, Katherine Smith, Mark Banik, Daniel Linder, Jonathan Palmer & Jiri Hulcr
A prevailing paradigm in forest ecology is that wood-boring beetles facilitate wood decay and carbon cycling, but empirical tests have yielded mixed results. We experimentally determined the effects of wood borers on fungal community assembly and wood decay within pine trunks in the southeastern United States. Pine trunks were made either beetle-accessible or inaccessible. Fungal communities were compared using culturing and high-throughput meta-barcode sequencing of DNA and RNA. Prior to beetle infestation, living pines had...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    18
  • 2020
    49
  • 2019
    24
  • 2018
    48
  • 2017
    25
  • 2016
    36
  • 2015
    28
  • 2014
    18
  • 2013
    12
  • 2012
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    269
  • Text
    9

Affiliations

  • United States Department of Agriculture
    277
  • Cornell University
    24
  • University of Florida
    22
  • University of Montana
    19
  • University of Georgia
    15
  • Oregon State University
    15
  • University of Minnesota
    13
  • Colorado State University
    11
  • Iowa State University
    9
  • North Carolina State University
    9