14 Works

Data from: A field test for host fruit odour discrimination and avoidance behaviour for Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the western United States

Sheina B. Sim, Monte Mattsson, Jasmine L. Feder, Dong H. Cha, Wee L. Yee, Robert B. Goughnour, Charles E. Linn & Jeffrey L. Feder
Prezygotic isolation due to habitat choice is important to many models of speciation-with-gene-flow. Habitat choice is usually thought to occur through positive preferences of organisms for particular environments. However, avoidance of non-natal environments may also play a role in choice and have repercussions for postzygotic isolation that preference does not. The recent host shift of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) from downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis, to introduced apple, Malus domestica, in the eastern U.S. is a...

Data from: Episodic radiations in the fly tree of life

Brian M. Wiegmann, Michelle D. Trautwein, Isaac S. Winkler, Norman B. Barr, Jung-Wook Kim, Christine Lambkin, Matthew A. Bertone, Brian K. Cassel, Keith M. Bayless, Alysha M. Heimberg, Benjamin M. Wheeler, Kevin J. Peterson, Thomas Pape, Bradley J. Sinclair, Jeffrey H. Skevington, Vladimir Blagoderov, Jason Caravas, Sujatha Narayanan Kutty, Urs Schmidt-Ott, Gail E. Kampmeier, F. Christian Thompson, David A. Grimaldi, Andrew T. Beckenbach, Gregory W. Courtney, Markus Friedrich … & J.-W. Kim
Flies are one of four superradiations of insects (along with beetles, wasps, and moths) that account for the majority of animal life on Earth. Diptera includes species known for their ubiquity (Musca domestica house fly), their role as pests (Anopheles gambiae malaria mosquito), and their value as model organisms across the biological sciences (Drosophila melanogaster). A resolved phylogeny for flies provides a framework for genomic, developmental, and evolutionary studies by facilitating comparisons across model organisms,...

Data from: Willing or unwilling to share primary biodiversity data: results and implications of an international survey

Xiaolei Huang, Bradford A. Hawkins, Fumin Lei, Gary L. Miller, Colin Favret, Ruiling Zhang & Gexia Qiao
Biodiversity science and conservation increasingly depend on the sharing and integration of large amounts of data, but many researchers resist sharing their primary biodiversity data. We recently conducted an international survey to ascertain the attitudes, experiences, and expectations regarding biodiversity data sharing and archiving of researchers. The results show that whereas most respondents are willing to share paper-related biodiversity data, more than sixty percent of respondents are unwilling to share primary data before publishing. Results...

Data from: Multigene phylogenetic analyses of the Thelonectria coronata and T. veuillotiana species complexes

Gary J. Samuels, Catalina Salgado-Salazar, Amy Y. Rossman, Mariana Capdet & Priscila Chaverri
Thelonectria is a recently established genus of common and ubiquitous fungi on woody hosts, previously placed in the genus Neonectria. Thelonectria coronata and T. veuillotiana occur sympatrically in several geographical areas in tropical, subtropical, and temperate regions. Previous taxonomic studies including T. coronata and T. veuillotiana suggested these fungi could represent species complexes; however, the morphological features used to define species exhibited few differences useful for testing this hypothesis. In order to assess the status...

Data from: Progressive genome-wide introgression in agricultural Campylobacter coli

Samuel K. Sheppard, Xavier Didelot, Keith A. Jolley, Aaron E. Darling, David J. Kelly, Alison Cody, Frances M. Colles, Norval J.C. Strachan, Iain D. Ogden, Ken Forbes, Nigel P. French, Philip Carter, William G. Miller, Noel D. McCarthy, Robert Owen, Eva Litrup, Michael Egholm, Stephen D. Bentley, Julian Parkhill, Martin C. J. Maiden, Daniel Falush, Jason P. Affourtit, Norval J. C. Strachan, Ben Pascoe & Guillaume Meric
Hybridization between distantly related organisms can facilitate rapid adaptation to novel environments, but is potentially constrained by epistatic fitness interactions among cell components. The zoonotic pathogens Campylobacter coli and C. jejuni differ from each other by around 15% at the nucleotide level, corresponding to an average of nearly 40 amino acids per protein-coding gene. Using whole genome sequencing, we show that a single C. coli lineage, which has successfully colonized an agricultural niche, has been...

Data from: Disruption of gene expression in hybrids of the fire ants Solenopsis invicta and Solenopsis richteri

Lino Ometto, Kenneth G. Ross, D. DeWayne Shoemaker & Laurent Keller
Transcriptome analysis is a powerful tool for unveiling the distribution and magnitude of genetic incompatibilities between hybridizing taxa. The nature of such incompatibilities is closely associated with the evolutionary histories of the parental species and may differ across tissues and between the sexes. In eusocial insects, the presence of castes that experience divergent selection regimes may result in additional distinct patterns of caste-specific hybrid incompatibilities. We analyzed levels of expression of >14,000 genes in two...

Data from: Novel forests maintain ecosystem processes after the decline of native tree species

Joseph Mascaro, R. Flint Hughes & Stefan A. Schnitzer
The positive relationship between species diversity (richness and evenness) and critical ecosystem functions, such as productivity, carbon storage, and nutrient cycling, is often used to predict the consequences of extinction. At regional scales, however, plant species richness is mostly increasing rather than decreasing because successful plant species introductions far outnumber extinctions. If these regional increases in richness lead to local increases in diversity, a reasonable prediction is that productivity, carbon storage, and nutrient cycling will...

Data from: Development and evaluation of 200 novel SNP assays for population genetic studies of westslope cutthroat trout and genetic identification of related taxa

Nathan R. Campbell, Stephen J. Amish, Victoria L. Pritchard, K. M. McKelvey, Michael K. Young, Michael K. Schwartz, John C. Garza, Gordon Luikart & Shawn R. Narum
DNA sequence data were collected and screened for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in westslope cutthroat trout (Oncorhynchus clarki lewisi) and also for substitutions that could be used to genetically discriminate rainbow trout (O. mykiss) and cutthroat trout, as well as several cutthroat trout subspecies. In total, 260 expressed sequence tag-derived loci were sequenced and allelic discrimination genotyping assays developed from 217 of the variable sites. Another 50 putative SNPs in westslope cutthroat trout were identified...

Data from: The genetic architecture of a complex ecological trait: host plant use in the specialist moth, Heliothis subflexa

Sara Jane Oppenheim, Fred Gould & Keith Roderick Hopper
We used genetic mapping to examine the genetic architecture of differences in host plant use between two species of noctuid moths, Heliothis subflexa, a specialist on Physalis spp., and its close relative, the broad generalist H. virescens. We introgressed H. subflexa chromosomes into the H. virescens background and analyzed 1,462 backcross insects. The effects of H. subflexa-origin chromosomes were small when measured as the percent variation explained in backcross populations (0.2 to 5%), but were...

Data from: The relationship between variable host grouping and functional responses among parasitoids of Antispila nysaefoliella (Lepidoptera: Heliozelidae)

Candace Low, Sonja J. Scheffer, Matthew L. Lewis & Michael W. Gates
Our study investigated the importance of variability in the parasitoid community as a source of selection on host group size using a field population of the tupelo leafminer, Antispila nysaefoliella Clemens, which specializes on tupelo, Nyssa sylvatica Marsh. Larvae were collected from leaves with variable numbers of larvae and screened for parasitism using polymerase chain reaction of mitochondrial cytochrome oxidase I using markers designed specifically for amplifying parasitoid DNA while excluding host DNA. This method...

Data from: Deep sequencing of amplicons reveals widespread intraspecific hybridization and multiple origins of polyploidy in big sagebrush (Artemisia tridentata)

Bryce A. Richardson, Justin T. Page, Prabin Bajgain, Stewart C. Sanderson & Joshua A. Udall
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Hybridization has played an important role in the evolution and ecological adaptation in diploid and polyploid plants. Artemisia tridentata (Asteraceae) tetraploids are extremely widespread and of great ecological importance. These tetraploids are often taxonomically identified as A. tridentata ssp. wyomingensis, or as autotetraploids of diploid subspecies tridentata and vaseyana. Few details are available as to how these tetraploids are formed or how they are related to diploid subspecies. METHODS: We used...

Data from: Behavioral evidence for fruit odor discrimination and sympatric host races of Rhagoletis pomonella flies in the western United States

Charles E. Linn, Wee L. Yee, Sheina B. Sim, Dong H. Cha, Thomas Powell, Robert B. Goughnour & Jeffrey L. Feder
The recent shift of Rhagoletis pomonella (Diptera: Tephritidae) from its native host downy hawthorn, Crataegus mollis, to introduced domesticated apple, Malus domestica, in the eastern U.S. is a model for sympatric host race formation. However, the fly is also present in the western U.S., where it may have been introduced via infested apples within the last 60 years. In addition to apple, R. pomonella also infests two hawthorns in the West, one the native black...

Data from: Avian predation pressure as a potential driver of periodical cicada cycle length

Walter D. Koenig & Andrew M. Liebhold
The extraordinarily long life cycles, synchronous emergences at 13- or 17-year intervals, and complex geographic distribution of periodical cicadas (Magicicada spp.) in eastern North America are an evolutionary enigma. Although a variety of factors, including satiation of above-ground predators and avoidance of interbrood hybridization, have been hypothesized to shape the evolution of this system, no empirical support for these mechanisms has previously been reported beyond the observation that bird predation can extirpate small, experimentally mistimed...

Data from: The wheat curl mite Aceria tosichella (Acari: Eriophyoidea) is a complex of cryptic lineages with divergent host ranges: evidence from molecular and plant bioassay data

Anna Skoracka, Lechosław Kuczyński, Wiktoria Szydło & Brian Rector
Aceria tosichella (the wheat curl mite, WCM) is a global pest of wheat and other cereals, causing losses by direct damage, as well as the transmission of plant viruses. The mite is considered to have an unusually wide host range for an eriophyoid species. The present study tested the commonly held assumption that WCM is a single, highly polyphagous species by assessing the host range of genetically distinct lineages of WCM occurring in Poland on...

Registration Year

  • 2012
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • United States Department of Agriculture
    14
  • Cornell University
    5
  • Washington State University Vancouver
    2
  • University of Notre Dame
    2
  • North Carolina State University
    2
  • CIUDAD
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Buenos Aires
    1
  • National Museums Scotland
    1
  • University of Georgia
    1