28 Works

Data from: Trade-offs in parasitism efficiency and brood size mediate parasitoid coexistence, with implications for biological control of the invasive emerald ash borer

Xiao-Yi Wang, David E. Jennings & Jian J. Duan
1. Parasitoids often are selected for use as biological control agents because of their high host specificity, yet such host specificity can result in strong interspecific competition. Few studies have examined whether and how various extrinsic factors (such as parasitism efficiency, i.e. the ability to optimize host-finding attack rates) influence the outcome of competition between parasitoids, even though they could have profound effects on the implementation of classical biological control programmes. 2. To determine the...

Data from: Quantifying \"apparent\" impact and distinguishing impact from invasiveness in multispecies plant invasions

Dean E. Pearson, Yvette K. Ortega, Ozkan Eren & Jose L. Hierro
The quantification of invader impacts remains a major hurdle to understanding and managing invasions. Here, we demonstrate a method for quantifying the community-level impact of multiple plant invaders by applying Parker et al.'s (1999) equation (impact = range x local abundance x per capita effect or per unit effect) using data from 620 survey plots from 31 grasslands across west-central Montana, USA. In testing for interactive effects of multiple invaders on native plant abundance (percent...

Data from: Cattle sex-specific recombination and genetic control from a large pedigree analysis

Li Ma, Jeffrey R. O'Connell, Paul M. Vanraden, Botong Shen, Abinash Padhi, Chuanyu Sun, Derek M. Bickhart, John B. Cole, Daniel J. Null, George E. Liu, Yang Da & George R. Wiggans
Meiotic recombination is an essential biological process that generates genetic diversity and ensures proper segregation of chromosomes during meiosis. From a large USDA dairy cattle pedigree with over half million genotyped animals, we extracted 186,927 three-generation families, identified over 8.5 million maternal and paternal recombination events, and constructed sex-specific recombination maps for 59,309 autosomal SNPs. The recombination map spans for 25.5 Morgans in males and 23.2 Morgans in females, for a total studied region of...

Data from: Enhanced diversity and aflatoxigenicity in interspecific hybrids of Aspergillus flavus and Aspergillus parasiticus

Rodrigo A. Olarte, Carolyn J. Worthington, Bruce W. Horn, Geromy G. Moore, Rakhi Singh, James T. Monacell, Joe W. Dorner, Eric A. Stone, De-Yu Xie & Ignazio Carbone
Aspergillus flavus and A. parasiticus are the two most important aflatoxin-producing fungi responsible for the contamination of agricultural commodities worldwide. Both species are heterothallic and undergo sexual reproduction in laboratory crosses. Here we examine the possibility of interspecific matings between A. flavus and A. parasiticus. These species can be distinguished morphologically and genetically, as well as by their mycotoxin profiles. Aspergillus flavus produces both B aflatoxins and cyclopiazonic acid (CPA), B aflatoxins or CPA alone,...

Data from: An integrated occupancy and space-use model to predict abundance of imperfectly detected, territorial vertebrates

Morgan W. Tingley, Robert L. Wilkerson, Christine A. Howell & Rodney B. Siegel
It is often highly desirable to know not only where species are likely to occur (i.e., occupancy) but also how many individuals are supported by a given habitat (i.e., density). For many animals, occupancy and density may be determined by distinct ecological processes. Here we develop a novel abundance model as the product of landscape-scale occupancy probability and habitat-scale density given occupancy. One can conceptualize our model as fully packing a landscape with home ranges...

Data from: Past tree influence and prescribed fire mediate biotic interactions and community reassembly in a grassland-restoration experiment

Charles B. Halpern, Joseph A. Antos, Donald McKenzie & Annette M. Olson
Woody plant encroachment of grasslands is occurring globally, with profound ecological consequences. Attempts to restore herbaceous dominance may fail if the woody state is resilient or if intervention leads to an alternate, undesirable state. Restoration outcomes often hinge on biotic interactions – particularly on priority effects that inhibit or promote community reassembly. Following experimental tree removal from conifer-invaded grasslands, we documented substantial variation in community reassembly associated with the changing abundance of the native clonal...

Data from: Naturally occurring variation in tadpole morphology and performance linked to predator regime

James B. Johnson, Daniel Saenz, Cory K. Adams & Toby J. Hibbitts
Divergent natural selection drives a considerable amount of the phenotypic and genetic variation observed in natural populations. For example, variation in the predator community can generate conflicting selection on behavioral, life-history, morphological, and performance traits. Differences in predator regime can subsequently increase phenotypic and genetic variations in the population and result in the evolution of reproductive barriers (ecological speciation) or phenotypic plasticity. We evaluated morphology and swimming performance in field collected Bronze Frog larvae (Lithobates...

Data from: A combined parasitological-molecular approach for non-invasive characterization of parasitic nematode communities in wild hosts

Sarah A. Budischak, Eric P. Hoberg, Art Abrams, Anna E. Jolles & Vanessa O. Ezenwa
Most hosts are concurrently or sequentially infected with multiple parasites; thus, fully understanding interactions between individual parasite species and their hosts depends on accurate characterization of the parasite community. For parasitic nematodes, noninvasive methods for obtaining quantitative, species-specific infection data in wildlife are often unreliable. Consequently, characterization of gastrointestinal nematode communities of wild hosts has largely relied on lethal sampling to isolate and enumerate adult worms directly from the tissues of dead hosts. The necessity...

Data from: Phylogenetic marker development for target enrichment from transcriptome and genome skim data: the pipeline and its application in southern African Oxalis (Oxalidaceae)

Roswitha Schmickl, Aaron Liston, Vojtěch Zeisek, Kenneth Oberlander, Kevin Weitemier, Shannon C. K. Straub, Richard C. Cronn, Léanne L. Dreyer & Jan Suda
Phylogenetics benefits from using a large number of putatively independent nuclear loci and their combination with other sources of information, such as the plastid and mitochondrial genomes. To facilitate the selection of orthologous low-copy nuclear (LCN) loci for phylogenetics in nonmodel organisms, we created an automated and interactive script to select hundreds of LCN loci by a comparison between transcriptome and genome skim data. We used our script to obtain LCN genes for southern African...

Data from: Accuracy of a prey-specific DNA assay and a generic prey-immunomarking assay for detecting predation

James R. Hagler, Felisa Blackmer & Dale W. Spurgeon
Predator gut examinations are useful for detecting arthropod predation events. The accuracy and reproducibility of two different gut assays are tested on various predator species that consumed Chrysoperla carnea (Stephens), that was externally labelled with rabbit immunoglobulin (IgG). Each predator homogenate was examined in triplicate for prey remains by both a conventional PCR assay to detect for C. carnea DNA and a generic ELISA to detect for rabbit IgG marked prey. The ability of each...

Data from: Demographic and spatiotemporal patterns of avian influenza infection at the continental scale, and in relation to annual life cycle of a migratory host

Rodolfo Nallar, Zsuzsanna Papp, Tasha Epp, Frederick A. Leighton, Seth R. Swafford, Thomas J. DeLiberto, Robert J. Dusek, Hon S. Ip, Jeffrey Hall, Johannes Berhane, Samantha E. J. Gibbs, Catherine Soos & Yohannes Berhane
Since the spread of highly pathogenic avian influenza (HPAI) H5N1 in the eastern hemisphere, numerous surveillance programs and studies have been undertaken to detect the occurrence, distribution, or spread of avian influenza viruses (AIV) in wild bird populations worldwide. To identify demographic determinants and spatiotemporal patterns of AIV infection in long distance migratory waterfowl in North America, we fitted generalized linear models with binominal distribution to analyze results from 13,574 blue-winged teal (Anas discors, BWTE)...

Data from: Seasonality of soil moisture mediates responses of ecosystem phenology to elevated CO2 and warming in a semi-arid grassland

Tamara J. Zelikova, David G. Williams, Rhonda Hoenigman, Dana M. Blumenthal, Jack A. Morgan & Elise Pendall
Vegetation greenness, detected using digital photography, is useful for monitoring phenology of plant growth, carbon uptake, and water loss at the ecosystem level. Assessing ecosystem phenology by greenness is especially useful in spatially extensive, water-limited ecosystems such as the grasslands of the western United States, where productivity is moisture dependent and may become increasingly vulnerable to future climate change. We used repeat photography and a novel means of quantifying greenness in digital photographs to assess...

Data from: Genetic structure, admixture, and invasion success in a Holarctic defoliator, the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar, Lepidoptera: Erebidae)

Yunke Wu, John J. Molongoski, Deborah F. Winograd, Steven M. Bogdanowicz, Artemis S. Louyakis, David R. Lance, Victor C. Mastro & Richard G. Harrison
Characterizing the current population structure of potentially invasive species provides a critical context for identifying source populations and for understanding why invasions are successful. Non-native populations inevitably lose genetic diversity during initial colonization events, but subsequent admixture among independently introduced lineages may increase both genetic variation and adaptive potential. Here we characterize the population structure of the gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar Linnaeus), one of the world's most destructive forest pests. Native to Eurasia and recently...

Data from: Modeling and mapping the probability of occurrence of invasive wild pigs across the contiguous United States

Meredith L. McClure, Christopher L. Burdett, Matthew L. Farnsworth, Mark W. Lutman, David M. Theobald, Philip D. Riggs, Daniel A. Grear & Ryan S. Miller
Wild pigs (Sus scrofa), also known as wild swine, feral pigs, or feral hogs, are one of the most widespread and successful invasive species around the world. Wild pigs have been linked to extensive and costly agricultural damage and present a serious threat to plant and animal communities due to their rooting behavior and omnivorous diet. We modeled the current distribution of wild pigs in the United States to better understand the physiological and ecological...

Data from: Conservation and modification of genetic and physiological toolkits underpinning diapause in bumble bee queens

Etya Amsalem, David A. Galbraith, Jonathan Cnaani, Peter E. A. Teal & Christina M. Grozinger
Diapause is the key adaptation allowing insects to survive unfavorable conditions and inhabit an array of environments. Physiological changes during diapause are largely conserved across species, and are hypothesized to be regulated by a conserved suite of genes (a “toolkit”). Furthermore, it is hypothesized that in social insects, this toolkit was co-opted to mediate caste differentiation between long-lived, reproductive, diapause-capable queens and short-lived, sterile workers. Using Bombus terrestris queens we examined the physiological and transcriptomic...

Data from: Genetic mapping shows intraspecific variation and transgressive segregation for caterpillar-induced aphid resistance in maize

Vered Tzin, Penelope L. Lindsay, Shawn A. Christensen, Lisa N. Meihls, Levi B. Blue & Georg Jander
Plants in nature have inducible defenses that sometimes lead to targeted resistance against particular herbivores, but susceptibility to others. The metabolic diversity and genetic resources available for maize (Zea mays) make this a suitable system for a mechanistic study of within-species variation in such plant-mediated interactions between herbivores. Beet armyworms (Spodoptera exigua) and corn leaf aphids (Rhopalosiphum maidis) are two naturally occurring maize herbivores with different feeding habits. Whereas chewing herbivore-induced methylation of 2,4-dihydroxy-7-methoxy-1,4-benzoxazin-3-one glucoside...

Data from: Colonization of the Mediterranean Basin by the vector biting midge species Culicoides imicola: an old story

Stephanie Jacquet, Claire Garros, Eric Lombaert, Catherine Walton, Johana Restrepo, Xavier Allene, Thierry Baldet, Catherine Cetre-Sossah, Alexandra Chaskopoulou, Jean-Claude Delecolle, Amelie Desvars, Mouloud Djerbal, Moussa Fall, Laetitia Gardes, Michel De Garine-Wichatitsky, Maria Goffredo, Yuval Gottlieb, Assane Gueye Fall, Muo Kasina, Karien Labuschagne, Youssef Lhor, Javier Lucientes, Thibaud Martin, Bruno Mathieu, Miguel Miranda … & J.-C. Delecolle
Understanding the demographic history and genetic make-up of colonizing species is critical for inferring population sources and colonization routes. This is of main interest for designing accurate control measures in areas newly colonized by vector species of economically important pathogens. The biting midge Culicoides imicola is a major vector of orbiviruses to livestock. Historically, the distribution of this species was limited to the Afrotropical region. Entomological surveys first revealed the presence of C. imicola in...

Data from: Sexual reproduction in Aspergillus flavus sclerotia: acquisition of novel alleles from soil populations and uniparental mitochondrial inheritance

Bruce W. Horn, Richard M. Gell, Rakhi Singh, Ronald B. Sorensen & Ignazio Carbone
Aspergillus flavus colonizes agricultural commodities worldwide and contaminates them with carcinogenic aflatoxins. The high genetic diversity of A. flavus populations is largely due to sexual reproduction characterized by the formation of ascospore-bearing ascocarps embedded within sclerotia. A. flavus is heterothallic and laboratory crosses between strains of the opposite mating type produce progeny showing genetic recombination. Sclerotia formed in crops are dispersed onto the soil surface at harvest and are predominantly produced by single strains of...

Data from: Forest disturbance accelerates thermophilization of understory plant communities

Jens T. Stevens, Hugh D. Safford, Susan Harrison & Andrew M. Latimer
1. Climate change is likely to shift plant communities towards species from warmer regions, a process termed “thermophilization.” In forests, canopy disturbances such as fire may hasten this process by increasing temperature and moisture stress in the understory, yet little is known about the mechanisms that might drive such shifts, or the consequences of these processes for plant diversity. 2. We sampled understory vegetation across a gradient of disturbance severity from a large-scale natural experiment...

Data from: Long-term avian community response to housing development at the boundary of U.S. protected areas: effect size increases with time

Eric M. Wood, Anna M. Pidgeon, Volker C. Radeloff, David P. Helmers, Patrick D. Culbert, Nicholas S. Keuler & Curtis H. Flather
1. Biodiversity conservation is a primary function of protected areas. However, protected areas also attract people, and therefore, land use has intensified at the boundaries of these lands globally. In the USA, since the 1970s, housing growth at the boundaries (<1 km) of protected areas has increased at a rate far higher than on more distant private lands. Here, we designed our analyses to address our central hypothesis that increasing housing density in and near...

Data from: Limiting opportunities for cheating stabilizes virulence in insect parasitic nematodes

Ben Raymond & David Shapiro-Ilan
Cooperative secretion of virulence factors by pathogens can lead to social conflict when cheating mutants exploit collective secretion, but do not contribute to it. If cheats outcompete cooperators within hosts, this can cause loss of virulence. Insect parasitic nematodes are important biocontrol tools that secrete a range of significant virulence factors. Critically, effective nematodes are hard to maintain without live passage, which can lead to virulence attenuation. Using experimental evolution we tested whether social cheating...

Data from: Population genomics of divergence among extreme and intermediate color forms in a polymorphic insect

Jeffrey D. Lozier, Jason M. Jackson, Michael E. Dillon & James P. Strange
Geographic variation in insect coloration is among the most intriguing examples of rapid phenotypic evolution and provides opportunities to study mechanisms of phenotypic change and diversification in closely related lineages. The bumble bee Bombus bifarius comprises two geographically disparate color groups characterized by red-banded and black-banded abdominal pigmentation, but with a range of spatially and phenotypically intermediate populations across western North America. Microsatellite analyses have revealed that B. bifarius in the USA are structured into...

Data from: The genomes of two key bumblebee species with primitive eusocial organisation

Ben M. Sadd, Seth M. Barribeau, Guy Bloch, Dirk C. De Graaf, Peter Dearden, Christine Elsik, Jurgen Gadau, Cornelius Grimmelikhuijzen, Martin Hasselmann, Jeffrey Lozier, Hugh Robertson, Guy Smagghe, Eckart Stolle, Matthias Van Vaerenbergh, Robert Waterhouse, Erich Bornberg-Bauer, Steffan Klasberg, Anna Bennett, Francisco Camara, Roderic Guigo, Katharina Hoff, Marco Mariotti, Monica Munos-Torres, Terence Murphy, Didac Santesmasses … & Kim C. Worley
Background: The shift from solitary to social behavior is one of the major evolutionary transitions. Primitively eusocial bumblebees are uniquely placed to illuminate the evolution of highly eusocial insect societies. Bumblebees are also invaluable natural and agricultural pollinators, and there is widespread concern over recent population declines in some species. High-quality genomic data will inform key aspects of bumblebee biology, including susceptibility to implicated population viability threats. Results: We report the high quality draft genome...

Data from: High precipitation and seeded species competition reduce seeded shrub establishment during dryland restoration

Matthew J. Rinella, Darcy H. Hammond, Ana-Elisa M. Bryant & Brian J. Kozar
Drylands comprise 40% of Earth's land mass and are critical to food security, carbon sequestration, and threatened and endangered wildlife. Exotic weed invasions, overgrazing, energy extraction, and other factors have degraded many drylands, and this has placed an increased emphasis on dryland restoration. The increased restoration focus has generated a wealth of experience, innovations and empirical data, yet the goal of restoring diverse, native, dryland plant assemblages composed of grasses, forbs, and shrubs has generally...

Data from: Competitive release and outbreaks of non-target pests associated with transgenic Bt cotton

Adam Ralph Zeilinger, Dawn M. Olson & David A. Andow
The adoption of transgenic Bt cotton has, in some cases, led to environmental and economic benefits through reduced insecticide use. However, the distribution of these benefits and associated risks among cotton growers and cotton-growing regions, has been uneven due in part to outbreaks of non-target or secondary pests, thereby requiring the continued use of synthetic insecticides. In the southeastern United States, Bt cotton adoption has resulted in increased abundance of and damage from stink bug...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    28

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    28

Affiliations

  • United States Department of Agriculture
    28
  • Oregon State University
    3
  • University of Wyoming
    2
  • University of Minnesota
    2
  • University of Florida
    2
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    2
  • Federal Institute of São Paulo
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • Sao Paulo State University
    1