24 Works

North American Hard Yellow Liver Disease: An Old Problem Readdressed

Bryan L. Stegelmeier, Meredyth Jones, Christopher P. Womack, T. Zane Davis & Dale R. Gardner
Hard yellow liver disease or fatty cirrhosis periodically affects cattle, sheep, goats, pronghorn antelope (Antilocapra americana) and whitetail deer (Odocoileus virginianus texanus) within several Texas counties in the United States. Clinically it presents as chronic liver disease with progressive hepatic necrosis and fibrosis, icterus and liver failure. The damaged livers are yellow and many have multiple firm, often gritty foci that are scattered throughout all lobes. Early investigations included feeding studies using potential toxic plants,...

Conflicting signal in transcriptomic markers leads to a poorly resolved backbone phylogeny of Chalcidoid wasps

Junxia Zhang, Amelia R.I. Lindsey, Ralph S. Peters, John M. Heraty, Keith R. Hopper, John H. Werren, Ellen O. Martinson, James B. Woolley, Matt J. Yoder & Lars Krogmann
Chalcidoidea (Hymenoptera) are a megadiverse superfamily of wasps with astounding variation in both morphology and biology. Most species are parasitoids and important natural enemies of insects in terrestrial ecosystems. In this study, we explored a transcriptome-based phylogeny of Chalcidoidea and found that poorly resolved relationships could only be marginally improved by adding more genes (a total of 5,591) and taxa (a total of 65), proof-checking for errors of homology and contamination, and decreasing missing data....

Data from: Long-term agroecosystem research in the Central Mississippi River Basin: Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed and regional herbicide water quality data

R. N. Lerch, C. Baffaut, E. J. Sadler & R. J. Kremer
PLEASE NOTE, THESE DATA ARE ALSO REFERRED TO IN ANOTHER PUBLICATION. PLEASE SEE http://doi.org/10.2134/jeq2013.12.0518. Goodwater Creek Experimental Watershed (GCEW) has been the focus area of a long-term effort to document the extent of and to understand the factors controlling herbicide transport. We document the datasets generated in the 20-yr-long research effort to study the transport of herbicides to surface and groundwater in the GCEW. This long-term effort was augmented with a spatially broad effort within...

Data from: Genetic diversity of Chamaecrista fasciculata (Fabaceae) from the USDA germplasm collection

Erika Bueno, Theodore Kisha, Sonja L. Maki, Eric J. B. Von Wettberg & Susan R. Singer
Objective: Chamaecrista fasciculata is a widespread annual legume across Eastern North America, with potential as a restoration planting, biofuel crop, and genetic model for non-papillinoid legumes. As a non-Papilinoid, C. fasciculata, belongs to the Caesalpiniod group in which nodulation likely arose independently of the nodulation in Papilinoid and Mimosoid legumes. Thus, C. fasciculata is an attractive model system for legume evolution. In this study, we describe population structure and genetic diversity among 32 USDA germplasm...

Assembly, annotation, and comparison of Macrophomina phaseolina isolates from strawberry and other hosts

Alyssa Burkhardt, Kevin Childs, Jie Wang, Marina Ramon & Frank Martin
Background: Macrophomina phaseolina is a fungal plant pathogen with a broad host range, but one genotype was shown to exhibit host preference/specificity on strawberry. This pathogen lacked a high-quality genome assembly and annotation, and little was known about genomic differences among isolates from different hosts. Results: We used PacBio sequencing and Hi-C scaffolding to provide nearly complete genome assemblies for M. phaseolina isolates representing the strawberry-specific genotype and another genotype recovered from alfalfa. The strawberry...

Data from: Microbial functional diversity: from concepts to applications

Arthur Escalas, Lauren Hale, James Voordeckers, Yunfeng Yang, Mary Firestone, Lisa Alvarez-Cohen & Jizhong Zhou
Functional diversity is increasingly recognized by microbial ecologists as the essential link between biodiversity patterns and ecosystem functioning, determining the trophic relationships and interactions between microorganisms, their participation in biogeochemical cycles and their responses to environmental changes. Consequently, its definition and quantification have practical and theoretical implications. In this opinion paper, we present a synthesis on the concept of microbial functional diversity from its definition to its application. Initially, we revisit to the original definition...

Data and analysis code for \"Forest recovery following extreme drought in California, USA: natural patterns and effects of pre-drought management\"

Derek Young, Marc Meyer, Becky Estes, Shana Gross, Amarina Wuenschel, Christina Restaino & Hugh Safford
This repository contains data and code for the paper "Forest recovery following extreme drought in California, USA: natural patterns and effects of pre-drought management" by Young et al., published in Ecological Applications. The abstract of the paper is as follows. Rising temperatures and more frequent and severe droughts are driving increases in tree mortality in forests around the globe. However, in many cases, the likely trajectories of forest recovery following drought-related mortality are poorly understood....

Recent evolutionary history predicts population but not ecosystem level patterns

Sarah Fitzpatrick, Madison Miller & John Kronenberger
In the face of rapid anthropogenic environmental change, it is increasingly important to understand how ecological and evolutionary interactions affect the persistence of natural populations. Augmented gene flow has emerged as a potentially effective management strategy to counteract negative consequences of genetic drift and inbreeding depression in small and isolated populations. However, questions remain about the long-term impacts of augmented gene flow and whether changes in individual and population fitness are reflected in ecosystem structure,...

Pleistocene glacial cycles drove lineage diversification and fusion in the Yosemite toad (Anaxyrus canorus)

Paul A Maier, Amy G Vandergast, Steve M Ostoja, Andres Aguilar & Andrew J Bohonak
Species endemic to alpine environments can evolve via steep ecological selection gradients between lowland and upland environments. Additionally, many alpine environments have faced repeated glacial episodes over the past two million years, fracturing these endemics into isolated populations. In this “glacial pulse” model of alpine diversification, cycles of allopatry and ecologically divergent glacial refugia play a role in generating biodiversity, including novel admixed (“fused”) lineages. We tested for patterns of glacial pulse lineage diversification in...

Data from: Range-wide population genomics of the Mexican fruit fly: towards development of pathway analysis tools

Julian R. Dupuis, Raul Ruiz-Arce, Norman B. Barr, Donald B. Thomas & Scott M. Geib
Recurrently invading pests provide unique challenges for pest management, but also present opportunities to utilize genomics to understand invasion dynamics and inform regulatory management through pathway analysis. In the southern United States, the Mexican fruit fly Anastrepha ludens is such a pest, and its incursions into Texas and California represent major threats to the agricultural systems of those regions. We developed a draft genome assembly for A. ludens, conducted range-wide population genomics using restriction-site associated...

A spatially explicit model to simulate the population dynamics of gypsy moth (Lymantria dispar)

Mandy C. Barron, Andrew M. Liebhold, John M. Kean, Brian Richardson & Eckehard G. Brockerhoff
Removal of host plants is a 'tool' that can be used for the eradication of invasive alien plant pests. We developed a spatially explicit agent-based population model to simulate the population dynamics of the European strain of gypsy moth, Lymantria dispar, based on Robinet et al. (2008 - Journal of Animal Ecology 77, 966–973. doi:10.1111/j.1365-2656.2008.01417.x). The model was coded in the R language (R Core Team, 2017) and is deposited in this Dryad record. A...

Extinct plants of North America north of Mexico

Wesley Knapp, Anne Frances, Reed Noss, Robert Naczi, Alan Weakley, George Gann, Bruce Baldwin, James Miller, Patrick McIntyre, Brent Mishler, Gerry Moore, Richard Olmstead, Anna Strong, Daniel Gluesenkamp & Kathryn Kennedy
The recent study by Humphreys et al., reporting extinction of almost 600 plant species globally, represents a groundbreaking effort at compiling direct data on seed plants. We applaud Humphreys et al. for quantifying plant extinctions because they formulate an important and testable hypothesis. However, their study missed many extinctions and rediscoveries of seed plants in the United States and Canada. Our team of experts has been compiling a list of extinct plants of North America...

The percentage of total agricultural area under maize, rice, wheat, vegetables, pulses and fruit production, by country, subject to water scarcity in 2050 as estimated from a multi-model ensemble

N. Fitton, P. Alexander, N. Arnell, B. Bajzelj, K. Calvin, J. Doelman, J.S. Gerber, P. Havlik, T. Hasegawa, M. Herrero, T. Krisztin, H. Van Meijl, T. Powell, R. Sands, E. Stehfest, P.C. West & P. Smith
Projections of global changes in water scarcity with the current extent of maize, rice, wheat, vegetables, pulses and fruit production commodities were combined to identify the potential country level vulnerabilities of cropland land to water scarcity in 2050. The data relate to an analysis of the impact changes in water availability will have on maize, rice, wheat, vegetables, pulses and fruit production commodities availability in 2050.

Data from: Modeling multi-species and multi-mode contact networks: implications for persistence of bovine tuberculosis at the wildlife-livestock interface

Mark Q. Wilber, Kim M. Pepin, , Scott E. Hygnstrom, Michael J. Lavelle, Tatiana Xifara, Kurt C. Vercauteren & Coleen T. Webb
1. Individual- and species-level heterogeneity in contact rates can alter the ability of a pathogen to invade a host community. Many pathogens have multiple modes of transmission -- by direct or indirect contact. It is important to identify the role of heterogeneity in different types of transmission when managing the risk of disease spillover at the interface among different host species. 2. We developed a network-based analysis to explore how individual- and species-level heterogeneity shape...

Data from: Interactions among morphotype, nutrition, and temperature impact fitness of an invasive fly.

Dalila Rendon, Vaughn Walton, Gabriella Tait, Jessica Buser, Ivana Lemos Souza, Anna Wallingford, Greg Loeb & Jana Lee
Invasive animals depend on finding a balanced nutritional intake to colonize, survive, and reproduce in new environments. This can be especially challenging during situations of fluctuating cold temperatures and food scarcity, but phenotypic plasticity may offer an adaptive advantage during these periods. We examined how lifespan, fecundity, pre-oviposition periods, and body nutrient contents were affected by dietary protein and carbohydrate (P:C) ratios at variable low temperatures in two morphs (winter morphs WM and summer morphs...

Data from: Molecular analyses identify hybridization-mediated nuclear evolution in newly discovered fungal hybrids

Fabiano Sillo, Paolo Gonthier, Blakey Lockman, Takao Kasuga & Matteo Garbelotto
Hybridization may be a major driver in the evolution of plant pathogens. In a high elevation Alpine larch stand in Montana, a novel hybrid fungal pathogen of trees originating from the mating of Heterobasidion irregulare with H. occidentale has been recently discovered. In this study, sequence analyses of one mitochondrial and four nuclear loci from 11 Heterobasidion genotypes collected in the same Alpine larch stand indicated that hybridization has increased allelic diversity by generating novel...

Data from: Strong patterns of intraspecific variation and local adaptation in Great Basin plants revealed through a review of 75 years of experiments

Owen W. Baughman, Alison C. Agneray, Matthew L. Forister, Francis F. Kilkenny, Erin K. Espeland, Rob Fiegener, Matthew E. Horning, Richard C. Johnson, Thomas N. Kaye, Jeffery Ott, John Bradley St. Clair & Elizabeth A. Leger
Variation in natural selection across heterogeneous landscapes often produces 1) among-population differences in phenotypic traits, 2) trait-by-environment associations, and 3) higher fitness of local populations. Using a broad literature review of common garden studies published between 1941 and 2017, we documented the commonness of these three signatures in plants native to North America’s Great Basin, an area of extensive restoration and revegetation efforts, and asked which traits and environmental variables were involved. We also asked,...

Data from: Predicting functional responses in agro-ecosystems from animal movement data to improve management of invasive pests

Mark Wilber, Sarah Chinn, James Beasley, Raoul Boughton, Ryan Brook, Stephen Ditchkoff, Justin Fischer, Steve Hartley, Lindsey Holstrom, John Kilgo, Jesse Lewis, Ryan Miller, Nathan Snow, Kurt VerCauteren, Samantha Wisely, Colleen Webb & Kim Pepin
Functional responses describe how changing resource availability affects consumer resource use, thus providing a mechanistic approach to prediction of the invasibility and potential damage of invasive alien species (IAS). However, functional responses can be context-dependent, varying with resource characteristics and availability, consumer attributes, and environmental variables. Identifying context-dependencies can allow invasion and damage risk to be predicted across different ecoregions. Understanding how ecological factors shape the functional response in agro-ecosystems can improve predictions of hotspots...

Relationships among wood-boring beetles, fungal endophytes and saprotrophs, and the decomposition of forest biomass.

James Skelton, Michelle Jusino, Paige Carlson, Katherine Smith, Mark Banik, Daniel Linder, Jonathan Palmer & Jiri Hulcr
A prevailing paradigm in forest ecology is that wood-boring beetles facilitate wood decay and carbon cycling, but empirical tests have yielded mixed results. We experimentally determined the effects of wood borers on fungal community assembly and wood decay within pine trunks in the southeastern United States. Pine trunks were made either beetle-accessible or inaccessible. Fungal communities were compared using culturing and high-throughput meta-barcode sequencing of DNA and RNA. Prior to beetle infestation, living pines had...

Not a melting pot: plant species aggregate in their non-native range

Gisela C. Stotz, James F. Cahill, Jonathan A. Bennett, Cameron N. Carlyle, Edward W. Bork, Diana Askarizadeh, Sandor Bartha, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Bazartseren Boldgiv, Leslie Brown, Marcelo Cabido, Giandiego Campetella, Stefano Chelli, Ofer Cohen, Sandra Díaz, Lucas Enrico, David Ensing, Batdelger Erdenetsetseg, Alessandra Fidelis, Heath W. Garris, Hugh A.L. Henry, Anke Jentsch, Mohammad Hassan Jouri, Kadri Koorem, Peter Manning … & Lauchlan H. Fraser
Aim: Plant species continue to be moved outside of their native range by human activities. Here, we aim at determining whether, once introduced, plants assimilate into native communities, or whether they aggregate, thus forming mosaics of native- and alien-rich communities. Alien species may aggregate in their non-native range due to shared habitat preferences, such as their tendency to establish in high-biomass, species-poor areas. Location: 22 herbaceous grasslands in 14 countries, mainly in the temperate zone....

Data from: Attract or defend? Pollen and vegetative secondary chemistry of three pollen-rewarding lupines

Jacob M. Heiling, Daniel Cook, Stephen T. Lee & Rebecca E. Irwin
PREMISE OF THE STUDY: Optimal Defense Theory predicts that selection should drive plants to differentially allocate resources for herbivore defense to tissues with high fitness values. As pollen’s primary role is the transport of gametes, plants may be expected to defend it from herbivory. However, for many animal-pollinated plants, pollen serves a secondary role as a pollinator reward. This may present a conflict between selection to defend pollen from herbivores and selection to reward pollinators....

Data from: The tomato pan-genome uncovers new genes and a rare allele regulating fruit flavor

Lei Gao, Itay Gonda, Honghe Sun, Qiyue Ma, Kan Bao, Denise M. Tieman, Elizabeth A. Burzynski-Chang, Tara L. Fish, Kaitlin A. Stromberg, Gavin L. Sacks, Theodore W. Thannhauser, Majid R. Foolad, Maria Jose Diez, Joaquin Canizares, Yimin Xu, Esther Van Der Knaap, Sanwen Huang, Harry J. Klee, James J. Giovannoni & Zhangjun Fei
Modern tomatoes have narrow genetic diversity limiting their improvement potential. We present a tomato pan-genome constructed using genome sequences of 725 phylogenetically and geographically representative accessions, revealing 4,873 genes absent from the reference genome. Presence/absence variation analyses reveal substantial gene loss and intense negative selection of genes and promoters during tomato domestication and improvement. Lost or negatively selected genes are enriched for important traits, especially disease resistance. We identify a rare allele in TomLoxC promoter...

Data from: Extreme site fidelity as an optimal strategy in an unpredictable and homogeneous environment

Brian D. Gerber, Mevin B. Hooten, Christopher P. Peck, Mindy B. Rice, James H. Gammonley, Anthony D. Apa & Amy J. Davis
1. Animal site fidelity structures space-use, population demography, and ultimately gene flow. Understanding the adaptive selection for site fidelity patterns provides a mechanistic understanding to both spatial and population processes. This can be achieved by linking space-use with environmental variability (spatial and temporal) and demographic parameters. However, rarely is the environmental context that drives the selection for site fidelity behavior fully considered. 2. We use ecological theory to understand whether the spatial and temporal variability...

Accuracy of genomic selection and long-term genetic gain for resistance to Verticillium wilt in a genetically diverse strawberry population

Steven Knapp, Dominique Pincot, Michael Hardigan, Glenn Cole, Peter Henry, Thomas Gordon & Randi Famula
Verticillium wilt, a soil-borne disease caused by the fungal pathogen Verticillium dahliae, threatens strawberry (Fragaria × ananassa) production worldwide. The development of resistant cultivars has been a challenge since the disease was first reported on strawberry in the early 1900s. The empirical evidence suggests that genetic gains have not been negligible and that the genetics of resistance to this pathogen is quantitative. While resistant cultivars have been developed, a comparatively small percentage are highly resistant,...

Registration Year

  • 2019
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • United States Department of Agriculture
    23
  • University of Georgia
    3
  • Agricultural Research Service
    3
  • University of Florida
    3
  • University of California, Berkeley
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Michigan State University
    2
  • University of Camerino
    1
  • Agricultural Genomics Institute at Shenzhen
    1
  • Islamic Azad University
    1