17 Works

Pierce's disease vector transmission-preference experiment on PdR1 resistant grapevines

Adam Zeilinger, Dylan Beal, Anne Sicard, Christopher Wallis, M. Andrew Walker & Rodrigo Almeida
Host defense against vector-borne plant pathogens is a critical component of integrated disease management. However, theory predicts that traits that confer tolerance or partial resistance can, under certain ecological conditions, enhance the spread of pathogens and spillover to more susceptible populations or cultivars. A key component driving such epidemic risk appears to be variation in host selection behavior of vectors based on infection status of the host. While recent theory has further emphasized the importance...

Conspecific leaf litter induces negative feedbacks in Asteraceae seedlings

Max Zaret & Briana Whitaker
The plant soil feedback (PSF) framework has been instrumental in quantifying soil microbial impacts on plant fitness and mechanisms for species coexistence. The recent extension of the PSF framework to microbes associated with aboveground tissues of plants, termed here as plant phyllosphere feedbacks (PPFs), can also help determine the role of aboveground microbes as drivers of plant-plant interactions. However, experimental tests of PPFs in wild hosts is nascent and their prevalence across diverse hosts remains...

Data from: Collapse, reorganization, and regime identity: breaking down past management paradigms in a forest-grassland ecotone

Victoria Donovan, Caleb Roberts, Carissa Wonkka, Daniel Uden, David Angeler, Craig Allen, David Wedin, Rhae Drijber & Dirac Twidwell
The identity of an ecological regime is central to modern resilience theory and our understanding of how systems collapse and reorganize following disturbance. However, resilience-based models used in ecosystem management have been criticized for their failure to integrate disturbance outcomes into regime identity. Assessments are needed to understand how well these classifications represent ecosystem responses that occur over management relevant time scales. We tracked post-wildfire forest and grassland dynamics 27 years after wildfire in eastern...

Disentangling the influence of water limitation and simultaneous above and belowground herbivory on plant tolerance and resistance to stress

Fabiane Mundim, Ernane Vieira-Neto, Hans Alborn & Emilio Bruna
1. Plants face multiple biotic and abiotic stressors simultaneously. Many species can tolerate and resist stress, but countermeasures differ between roots and leaves. Since herbivores and environmental conditions modulate costs and benefits of plant defense traits, stress responses are context-dependent. We examined whole-plant tolerance and resistance responses to individual and combined effects of above and belowground herbivory under variable water conditions. 2. We manipulated water availability and access by two common herbivores (Spodoptera exigua caterpillars...

Species mixture effects and climate influence growth, recruitment and mortality in Interior West U.S.A. Populus tremuloides - conifer communities

Christopher Looney, Wilfred Previant, John Bradford & Linda Nagel
Tree-species mixture effects (e.g., complementarity and facilitation) have been found to increase individual-tree productivity, lessen mortality, and improve recruitment in forests worldwide. By promoting more efficient and complete resource use, mixture effects may also lessen individual-tree-level water stress, thus improving drought-resistance. We investigated the influence of mixture effects on tree productivity, mortality, and recruitment across broad compositional and moisture gradients in high-elevation Interior West US mixed-conifer communities, where Populus tremuloides (trembling aspen) is the major...

Data from: Nutrient enrichment increases invertebrate herbivory and pathogen damage in grasslands

Anne Ebeling & Dana M. Blumenthal
This dataset contains data on leaf damage by invertebrates and pathogens derived in a globally-distributed experiment manipulating nutrient addition (Nutrient Network). In total we estimated leaf damage on 153 plant taxa from twenty-seven grasslands worldwide, under ambient conditions and with experimentally elevated nitrogen and phosphorus. Additionally, we give MAT and MAP from WorldClim 1 for each site and percent cover for each plant species in the respective plot.

Data from: Thermal history of alfalfa leafcutting bees affects nesting and diapause incidence

Kayla Earls, Kendra Greenlee, Monique Porter & Joseph Rinehart
Variable spring temperatures may expose developing insects to sublethal conditions, resulting in long-term consequences. The alfalfa leafcutting bee, Megachile rotundata, overwinters as a prepupa inside a brood cell, resuming development in spring. During these immobile stages of development, bees must tolerate unfavourable temperatures. In this study, we test how exposure to low temperature stress during development affects subsequent reproduction and characteristics of the F1 generation. Developing male and female M. rotundata were exposed to either...

Correlation and co-localization of QTLs for stomatal density, canopy temperature, and productivity with and without drought stress in Setaria

Parthiban Thathapalli Prakash, Darshi Banan, Rachel Paul, Maximilian Feldman, Dan Xie, Luke Freyfogle, Ivan Baxter & Andrew Leakey
Mechanistic modeling indicates that stomatal conductance could be reduced to improve water use efficiency (WUE) in C4 crops. Genetic variation in stomatal density and canopy temperature was evaluated in the model C4 genus, Setaria. Recombinant inbred lines (RILs) derived from a Setaria italica × Setaria viridis cross were grown with ample or limiting water supply under field conditions in Illinois. An optical profilometer was used to rapidly assess stomatal patterning, and canopy temperature was measured...

Tree species of wet tropical forests differ in their tissue biochemistry and effects on soil carbon dynamics

Ann Russell, Rachel Marek & Daniel Olk
Given the hypothesized effects on soil organic matter (SOM) of polyphenols in plant tissues, differences among tree species in their biochemical composition could influence the turnover and accrual of SOM in various ways. The extent to which the biochemical composition of leaf and fine-root tissues differ among tropical tree species, and the effects on soil dynamics, are largely undocumented, however. We used cupric oxide analyses of plant tissues and soil in long-term, replicated, mono-dominant 15-yr-old...

Omnivory in predatory ladybird beetles is widespread and driven by an appetite for sterols

Todd Ugine, Stuart Krasnoff & Spencer Behmer
1. Animals maintain physiological and behavioral systems that allow them to detect and consume specific macro- and micronutrients to maximize their fitness. One common physiological system is the nutrient-state-dependent or demand-driven appetite. These systems are well described for macronutrient regulation, but not for micronutrients. 2. Sterols are essential micronutrients that all animals need to survive. They are the backbone of many hormones, important in cell signaling, and an integral component of cell membranes. 3. Lady...

Assessing intrastate cattle shipments from interstate data and expert opinion

Peter Brommesson, Stefan Sellman, Lindsay Beck-Johnson, Clayton N Hallman, Deedra Murieta, Colleen Webb, Ryan Miller, Katie Portacci & Tom Lindström
Live animal shipments are a potential route for transmitting animal diseases between holdings and are crucial when modeling spread of infectious diseases. Yet, complete contact networks are not available in all countries, including the United States. Here, we considered a 10% sample of Interstate Certificate of Veterinary Inspections from one year (2009). We focused on distance dependence in contacts and investigated how different functional forms affect estimates of unobserved intrastate shipments. To further enhance our...

Testing the potential contribution of Wolbachia to speciation when cytoplasmic incompatibility becomes associated with host‐related reproductive isolation

Daniel Bruzzese, Hannes Schuler, Thomas Wolfe, Mary Glover, Joseph Mastroni, Meredith Doellman, Cheyenne Tait, Wee Yee, Juan Rull, Martin Aluja, Glen Hood, Robert Goughnour, Christian Stauffer, Patrik Nosil, Jeffery Feder, Daniel J. Bruzzese, Thomas M. Wolfe, Mary M. Glover, Meredith M. Doellman, Wee L. Yee, Glen R. Hood & Jeffery L. Feder
Endosymbiont induced cytoplasmic incompatibility (CI) may play an important role in arthropod speciation. However, whether CI consistently becomes associated or coupled with other host-related forms of reproductive isolation (RI) to impede the transfer of endosymbionts between hybridizing populations and further the divergence process remains an open question. Here, we show varying degrees of pre- and post-mating RI exist among allopatric populations of two interbreeding cherry-infesting tephritid fruit flies (Rhagoletis cingulata and R. indifferens) across North...

Large herbivores suppress liana infestation in an African savanna

Tyler C. Coverdale, Ryan D. O'Connell, Matthew C. Hutchinson, Amanda Savagian, Tyler R. Kartzinel, Todd M. Palmer, Jacob R. Goheen, David J. Augustine, Mahesh Sankaran, Corina E. Tarnita & Robert M. Pringle
African savannas are the last stronghold of diverse large-mammal communities, and a major focus of savanna ecology is to understand how these animals affect the relative abundance of trees and grasses. However, savannas support diverse plant life-forms, and human-induced changes in large-herbivore assemblages—declining wildlife populations and their displacement by livestock—may cause unexpected shifts in plant community composition. We investigated how herbivory affects the prevalence of lianas (woody vines) and their impact on trees in an...

Eight generations of native seed cultivation reduces plant fitness relative to the wild progenitor population

Riley Pizza, Erin Espeland & Julie Etterson
Native seed for restoration is in high demand, but widespread habitat degradation will likely prevent enough seed from being sustainably harvested from wild populations to meet this need. While propagation of native species has emerged in recent decades to address this resource gap, few studies have tested whether the processes of sampling from wild populations, followed by generations of farm cultivation, reduces plant fitness tolerance to stress over time. To test this, we grew the...

Bee species differ in pollen deposition curves with consequences for gene flow

Johanne Brunet
Premise of the study Pollinator foraging behavior can influence pollen dispersal and gene flow. In many plant species a pollinator trips a flower by applying pressure to release its sexual organs. We propose that differences in tripping rate among grooming pollinators could generate distinct pollen deposition curves, the pattern of pollen deposition over successive flowers visited. This study compares the pollen deposition curves of two grooming pollinators, a social bumble bee and a solitary leafcutting...

Towards a stable global Noctuidae (Lepidoptera) taxonomy

Kevin Keegan, Jadranka Rota, Reza Zahiri, Alberto Zilli, Niklas Wahlberg, B. Christian Schmidt, J. Donald Lafontaine, Paul Goldstein & David Wagner
The family Noctuidae is one of the world’s most diverse, ecologically successful, and economically important animal lineages; with over 12,000 species in ~1150 genera. We inferred a phylogeny based on eight protein-coding genes (>6,400 base pairs) for the global fauna, greatly expanding upon previous attempts to stabilize the higher classification of Noctuidae by sampling 70 of the 76 widely recognized family-group taxa: 20 of the 21 subfamilies, 32 of the 35 tribes, and 18 of...

Predicted distribution of a rare and understudied forest carnivore: Humboldt martens (Martes caurina humboldtensis)

Katie Moriarty, Joel Thompson, Matthew Delheimer, Brent Barry, Mark Linnell, Taal Levi, Keith Hamm, Desiree Early, Holly Gamblin, Micaela Szykman-Gunther, Jordan Ellison, Janet Prevey, Jennifer Hartman & Raymond Davis
Many mammalian species have experienced range contractions. Following a reduction in distribution that has resulted in apparently small and disjunct populations, the Humboldt marten (Martes caurina humboldtensis) was recently designated as federally Threatened and state Endangered. This subspecies of Pacific marten occurring in coastal Oregon and northern California, also known as coastal martens, appear unlike martens that occur in snow-associated regions in that vegetation associations appear to differ widely between Humboldt marten populations. We expected...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • United States Department of Agriculture
    17
  • University of Florida
    2
  • United States Geological Survey
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • Centre national de la recherche scientifique
    1
  • Notre Dame of Dadiangas University
    1
  • University of Hamburg
    1
  • Princeton University
    1