20 Works

Data from: Going with the flow: the role of ocean circulation in global marine ecosystems under a changing climate

Simon J. Van Gennip, Ekaterina E. Popova, Andrew Yool, Gretta T. Pecl, Alistair J. Hobday & Cascade J. B. Sorte
Ocean warming, acidification, deoxygenation and reduced productivity are widely considered to be the major stressors to ocean ecosystems induced by emissions of CO2. However, an overlooked stressor is the change in ocean circulation in response to climate change. Strong changes in the intensity and position of the western boundary currents have already been observed, and the consequences of such changes for ecosystems are beginning to emerge. In this study, we address climatically induced changes in...

Data from: Anthropogenic debris ingestion by avifauna in eastern Australia

Lauren Roman, Qamar A. Schuyler, Britta Denise Hardesty & Kathy A. Townsend
Anthropogenic debris in the world’s oceans and coastal environments is a pervasive global issue that has both direct and indirect impacts on avifauna. The number of bird species affected, the feeding ecologies associated with an increased risk of debris ingestion, and selectivity of ingested debris have yet to be investigated in most of Australia’s coastal and marine birds. With this study we aim to address the paucity of data regarding marine debris ingestion in Australian...

Data from: Rapid evolutionary response to a transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils

Brendan Epstein, Menna Jones, Rodrigo Hamede, Sarah Hendricks, Hamish McCallum, Elizabeth P. Murchison, Barbara Schönfeld, Cody Wiench, Paul Hohenlohe & Andrew Storfer
Although cancer rarely acts as an infectious disease, a recently emerged transmissible cancer in Tasmanian devils (Sarcophilus harrisii) is virtually 100% fatal. Devil facial tumour disease (DFTD) has swept across nearly the entire species’ range, resulting in localized declines exceeding 90% and an overall species decline of more than 80% in less than 20 years. Despite epidemiological models that predict extinction, populations in long-diseased sites persist. Here we report rare genomic evidence of a rapid,...

Data from: Inferring contemporary and historical genetic connectivity from juveniles

Pierre Feutry, Oliver Berry, Peter M. Kyne, Richard D. Pillans, Rich Hillary, Peter M. Grewe, James R. Marthick, Grant Johnson, Rasanthi M. Gunasekera, Nicholas J. Bax, Mark Bravington & Richard M. Hillary
Measuring population connectivity is a critical task in conservation biology. While genetic markers can provide reliable long-term historical estimates of population connectivity, scientists are still limited in their ability to determine contemporary patterns of gene flow, the most practical time frame for management. Here, we tackled this issue by developing a new approach that only requires juvenile sampling at a single time period. To demonstrate the usefulness of our method, we used the Speartooth shark...

Data from: Australian spiny mountain crayfish and their temnocephalan ectosymbionts: an ancient association on the edge of coextinction?

Jennifer F. Hoyal Cuthill, Kim B. Sewell, Lester R. G. Cannon, Michael A. Charleston, Susan Lawler, D. Timothy J. Littlewood, Peter D. Olson & David Blair
Australian spiny mountain crayfish (Euastacus, Parastacidae) and their ecotosymbiotic temnocephalan flatworms (Temnocephalida, Platyhelminthes) may have co-occurred and interacted through deep time, during a period of major environmental change. Therefore, reconstructing the history of their association is of evolutionary, ecological, and conservation significance. Here, time-calibrated Bayesian phylogenies of Euastacus species and their temnocephalans (Temnohaswellia and Temnosewellia) indicate near-synchronous diversifications from the Cretaceous. Statistically significant cophylogeny correlations between associated clades suggest linked evolutionary histories. However, there is...

Data from: Two-current choice flumes for testing avoidance and preference in aquatic animals

Fredrik Jutfelt, Josefin Sundin, Graham D. Raby, Anna-Sara Krång & Timothy D. Clark
Aquatic chemical ecology is an important and growing field of research that involves understanding how organisms perceive and respond to chemical cues in their environment. Research assessing the preference or avoidance of a water source containing specific chemical cues has increased in popularity in recent years, and a variety of methods have been described in the scientific literature. Two-current choice flumes have seen the greatest increase in popularity, perhaps because of their potential to address...

Data from: Selection and constraints on offspring size-number trade-offs in sand lizards (Lacerta agilis)

Gabriella Ljungström, Martin Stjernstedt, Erik Wapstra & Mats Olsson
The trade-off between offspring size and number is a central component of life-history theory, postulating that larger investment into offspring size inevitably decreases offspring number. This trade-off is generally discussed in terms of genetic, physiological or morphological constraints; however, as among-individual differences can mask individual trade-offs, the underlying mechanisms may be difficult to reveal. In this study, we use multivariate analyses to investigate whether there is a trade-off between offspring size and number in a...

Data from: Detecting selection on temporal and spatial scales: a genomic time-series assessment of selective responses to devil facial tumor disease

Anna Brüniche-Olsen, Jeremy J. Austin, Menna E. Jones, Barbara R. Holland & Christopher P. Burridge
Detecting loci under selection is an important task in evolutionary biology. In conservation genetics detecting selection is key to investigating adaptation to the spread of infectious disease. Loci under selection can be detected on a spatial scale, accounting for differences in demographic history among populations, or on a temporal scale, tracing changes in allele frequencies over time. Here we use these two approaches to investigate selective responses to the spread of an infectious cancer—devil facial...

Data from: Experimental contact zones reveal causes and targets of sexual selection in hybridizing lizards

Hannah E. A. MacGregor, Geoffrey M. While, Jade Barrett, Guillem Pérez I De Lanuza, Pau Carazo, Sozos Michaelides & Tobias Uller
Divergence in sexually selected traits in allopatry should affect the degree and direction of hybridization. However, few studies have established the causes and targets of sexual selection during secondary contact. Common wall lizards (Podarcis muralis) from north-central Italy have highly exaggerated male sexual traits compared to populations in Western Europe. Using experimental populations, we show that this creates asymmetries in male dominance, spatial habitat use and reproductive success upon secondary contact. Hybridization occurred almost exclusively...

Data from: Habitat saturation promotes delayed dispersal in a social reptile

Ben Halliwell, Tobias Uller, David G. Chapple, Michael G. Gardner, Erik Wapstra & Geoffrey M. While
When and where offspring disperse has important implications for the evolutionary emergence and maintenance of group living. In non-cooperative breeders, direct benefits of delayed dispersal are relatively limited, suggesting that decisions regarding whether or not to remain in the parental territory are largely driven by the availability of suitable habitat in which to settle. While there is ample evidence of correlations between habitat saturation and delayed dispersal, experimental tests are rare, particularly for species with...

Data from: Corticosterone: a costly mediator of signal honesty in sand lizards

Willow R. Lindsay, Erik Wapstra, Bengt Silverin & Mats Olsson
The mechanisms underlying honest signal expression remain elusive and may involve the integration of social and physiological costs. Corticosterone is a socially modulated metabolic hormone that mediates energy investment and behavior and may therefore function to deter dishonest signal expression. We examined the relationship between corticosterone and green badge coloration in male sand lizards (Lacerta agilis), hypothesizing that physiological and behavioral costs resulting from elevated baseline glucocorticoids function in maintenance of honest signal expression. We...

Data from: Effect of marker choice and thermal cycling protocol on zooplankton DNA metabarcoding studies

Laurence J. Clarke, Jason M. Beard, Kerrie M. Swadling & Bruce E. Deagle
DNA metabarcoding is a promising approach for rapidly surveying biodiversity and is likely to become an important tool for measuring ecosystem responses to environmental change. Metabarcoding markers need sufficient taxonomic coverage to detect groups of interest, sufficient sequence divergence to resolve species, and will ideally indicate relative abundance of taxa present. We characterized zooplankton assemblages with three different metabarcoding markers (nuclear 18S rDNA, mitochondrial COI, and mitochondrial 16S rDNA) to compare their performance in terms...

Data from: A cross-continental comparison of plant and beetle responses to retention of forest patches during timber harvest

Susan C. Baker, Charles B. Halpern, Timothy J. Wardlaw, Christel Kern, Graham J. Edgar, Russell J. Thomson, Richard E. Bigley, Jerry F. Franklin, Kamal J.K. Gandhi, Lena Gustafsson, Samuel Johnson, Brian J. Palik, Thomas A. Spies, E. Ashley Steel, Jan Weslien, Joachim Strengbom & Kamal J. K. Gandhi
Timber harvest can adversely affect forest biota. Recent research and application suggest that retention of mature forest elements (‘retention forestry’), including unharvested patches (or ‘aggregates’) within larger harvested units, can benefit biodiversity compared to clearcutting. However, it is unclear whether these benefits can be generalized among the diverse taxa and biomes in which retention forestry is practiced. Lack of comparability in methods for sampling and analysing responses to timber harvest and edge creation presents a...

Data from: Fine partitioning of epiphyte habitat within Johansson zones in tropical Australian rainforest trees

Jennifer C. Sanger & James B. Kirkpatrick
For over three decades, the Johansson zones have been widely used in epiphyte studies as a way of stratifying the host tree into habitat zones, however, the usefulness of this system has been questioned. We test the effectiveness of the Johansson zones by grouping epiphyte species by the substrate and microclimatic attributes of their individual occurrences and assessing the fidelity of these groups to the Johansson zones. Habitat characteristics were recorded for every individual epiphyte...

Data from: Evolutionary radiations of Proteaceae are triggered by the interaction between traits and climates in open habitats

Renske E. Onstein, Gregory J. Jordan, Hervé Sauquet, Peter H. Weston, Yanis Bouchenak-Khelladi, Ian J. Wright, Raymond J. Carpenter & H. Peter Linder
Aim: Ecologically driven diversification can create spectacular diversity in both species numbers and form. However, the prediction that the match between intrinsic (e.g. functional trait) and extrinsic (e.g. climatic niche) variables may lead to evolutionary radiation has not been critically tested. Here, we test this hypothesis in the Southern Hemisphere plant family Proteaceae, which shows a spectacular diversity in open mediterranean shrublands in the Southwest Australian Floristic Region (SWAFR) and the Cape Floristic Region (CFR)....

Data from: Habitat structure influences parent-offspring association in a social lizard

Thomas Botterill-James, Ben Halliwell, Emily Cooper-Scott, Tobias Uller, Erik Wapstra & Geoffrey M. While
Parental care emerges as a result of an increase in the extent of interaction between parents and their offspring. These interactions can provide the foundation for the evolution of a range of complex parental behaviors. Therefore, fundamental to understanding the evolution of parental care is an understanding of the factors that promote this initial increase in parent-offspring association. Here, we used large outdoor enclosures to test how the spatial structure of high-quality habitat affects the...

Data from: Outlier SNPs enable food traceability of the southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii

Cecilia Villacorta-Rath, Irina Ilyushkina, Jan M. Strugnell, Bridget S. Green, Nicholas P. Murphy, Stephen R. Doyle, Nathan E. Hall, Andrew J. Robinson & James J. Bell
Recent advances in next-generation sequencing have enhanced the resolution of population genetic studies of non-model organisms through increased marker generation and sample throughput. Using double digest restriction site-associated DNA sequencing (ddRADseq), we investigated the population structure of the commercially important southern rock lobster, Jasus edwardsii, in Australia and New Zealand with the aim of identifying a panel of SNP markers that could be used to trace country of origin. Four ddRADseq libraries comprising a total...

Data from: Socioecological predictors of immune defenses in wild spotted hyenas

Andrew S. Flies, Linda S. Mansfield, Emily J. Flies, Chris K. Grant & Kay E. Holekamp
Social rank can profoundly affect many aspects of mammalian reproduction and stress physiology, but little is known about how immune function is affected by rank and other socioecological factors in free-living animals. In this study, we examine the effects of sex, social rank and reproductive status on immune function in long-lived carnivores that are routinely exposed to a plethora of pathogens, yet rarely show signs of disease. Here, we show that two types of immune...

Data from: Biotic and abiotic variables influencing plant litter breakdown in streams: a global study

Luz Boyero, Richard Pearson, Cang Hui, Mark Gessner, Javier Perez, Markos Alexandrou, Manuel Graça, Bradley Cardinale, Ricardo Albariño, M. Arunachalam, Leon Barmuta, Andrew Boulton, Andreas Bruder, Marcos Callisto, Eric Chauvet, Russell Death, David Dudgeon, Andrea Encalada, Veronica Ferreira, Ricardo Figueroa, Alex Flecker, , Julie Helson, Tomoya Iwata, Tajang Jinggut … & Catherine Yule
Plant litter breakdown is a key ecological process in terrestrial and freshwater ecosystems. Streams and rivers, in particular, have high rates of carbon dioxide evasion and they contribute substantially to global carbon fluxes. However, there is little information available on the relative roles of different drivers of plant litter breakdown in fresh waters, particularly at large scales. We present a global-scale study of litter breakdown in streams to compare the roles of biotic, climatic and...

Data from: Loss of genetic diversity and increased embryonic mortality in non-native lizard populations

Sozos N. Michaelides, Geoffrey M. While, Natalia Zajac, Fabien Aubret, Brittny Calsbeek, Roberto Sacchi, Marco A. L. Zuffi & Tobias Uller
Many populations are small and isolated with limited genetic variation and high risk of mating with close relatives. Inbreeding depression is suspected to contribute to extinction of wild populations, but the historical and demographic factors that contribute to reduced population viability are often difficult to tease apart. Replicated introduction events in non-native species can offer insights into this problem because they allow us to study how genetic variation and inbreeding depression are affected by demographic...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    20

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    20

Affiliations

  • University of Tasmania
    20
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    4
  • University of Oxford
    4
  • Lund University
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • University of Queensland
    2
  • University of Georgia
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • La Trobe University
    2
  • University of Gothenburg
    2