29 Works

Data from: Counting with DNA in metabarcoding studies: how should we convert sequence reads to dietary data?

Bruce E. Deagle, Austen C. Thomas, Julie C. McInnes, Laurence J. Clarke, Eero J. Vesterinen, Elizabeth L. Clare, Tyler R. Kartzinel & J. Paige Eveson
Advances in DNA sequencing technology have revolutionised the field of molecular analysis of trophic interactions and it is now possible to recover counts of food DNA sequences from a wide range of dietary samples. But what do these counts mean? To obtain an accurate estimate of a consumer’s diet should we work strictly with datasets summarising frequency of occurrence of different food taxa, or is it possible to use relative number of sequences? Both approaches...

Data from: New determination of prey and parasite species for Northern Indian Ocean blue whales

Asha De Vos, Cassandra E. Faux, James Marthick, Joanne Dickinson, Simon Jarman & Simon N. Jarman
Blue whales are little studied, face significant anthropogenic threats and within the Northern Indian Ocean, have a restricted range, making them an archetype for conservation needs of megafauna around the world. We studied feeding behaviour of blue whales using dietary DNA metabarcoding of faecal samples. While globally blue whale populations feed predominantly on Euphausiidae, 87 % of prey DNA amplicons extracted from faecal samples from this population were sergestid shrimp, demonstrating that blue whales can...

Data from: Seascape habitat patchiness and hydrodynamics explain genetic structuring of kelp populations

Christopher Burridge, Melinda A Coleman, Graham Edgar, Neville S Barrett, Halley M S Durrant, HMS Durrant, NS Barrett, GJ Edgar, CP Burridge & MA Coleman
Macroalgae underpin most temperate inshore ecosystems, but increasing macroalgal loss, fragmentation and range contractions are eroding connectivity among populations. Understanding loss, and predicting the likelihood of recovery, is dependent on knowledge of population connectivity and how it is mediated by variability in local seascapes. Although many studies of marine connectivity have focussed on influences of geographic distance on genetic structure, the contribution of intervening habitat is rarely considered. We tested the extent to which geographic...

Data from: Age estimation in a long-lived seabird (Ardenna tenuirostris) using DNA methylation-based biomarkers

Ricardo De Paoli-Iseppi, Bruce E. Deagle, Andrea M. Polanowski, Clive R. McMahon, Joanne L. Dickinson, Mark A. Hindell & Simon N. Jarman
Age structure is a fundamental aspect of animal population biology. Age is strongly related to individual physiological condition, reproductive potential and mortality rate. Currently, there are no robust molecular methods for age estimation in birds. Instead, individuals must be ringed as chicks to establish known-age populations, which is a labour intensive and expensive process. The estimation of chronological age using DNA methylation is emerging as a robust approach in mammals including humans, mice and some...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • University of Tasmania
    29
  • La Trobe University
    4
  • Colorado State University
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    2
  • Duke University
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    2
  • Curtin University
    2