77 Works

Data from: Population genomics of wild and laboratory zebrafish (Danio rerio)

Andrew R Whiteley, Anuradha Bhat, Emilia P Martins, Richard L Mayden, M Arunachalam, Silva Uusi-Heikkilä, A.T.A. Ahmed, Jiwan Shrestha, Matthew Clark, Derek Stemple & Louis Bernatchez
Understanding a wider range of genotype-phenotype associations can be achieved through ecological and evolutionary studies of traditional laboratory models. Here, we conducted the first large-scale geographic analysis of genetic variation within and among wild zebrafish (Danio rerio) populations occurring in Nepal, India, and Bangladesh and we genetically compared wild populations to several commonly used lab strains. We examined genetic variation at 1,832 polymorphic EST-based SNPs and the cytb mitochondrial gene in 13 wild populations and...

Data from: Adaptive genetic divergence along narrow environmental gradients in four stream insects

Kozo Watanabe, So Kazama, Tatsuo Omura & Michael T. Monaghan
A central question linking ecology with evolutionary biology is how environmental heterogeneity can drive adaptive genetic divergence among populations. We examined adaptive divergence of four stream insects from six adjacent catchments in Japan by combining field measures of habitat and resource components with genome scans of non-neutral Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphism (AFLP) loci. Neutral genetic variation was used to measure gene flow and non-neutral genetic variation was used to test for adaptive divergence. We identified...

Data from: Spatial and topical imbalances in biodiversity research

Laura Tydecks, Jonathan Jeschke, Max Wolf, Gabriel Singer, Klement Tockner & Jonathan M. Jeschke
The rapid erosion of biodiversity is among the biggest challenges human society is facing. Concurrently, major efforts are in place to quantify changes in biodiversity, to understand the consequences for ecosystem functioning and human wellbeing, and to develop sustainable management strategies. Based on comprehensive bibliometric analyses covering 134,321 publications, we report systematic spatial biases in biodiversity-related research. Research is dominated by wealthy countries, while major research deficits occur in regions with disproportionately high biodiversity as...

Data from: Variation in species light acquisition traits under fluctuating light regimes: implications for non‐equilibrium coexistence

Alexis Guislain, Beatrix E. Beisner & Jan Köhler
Resource distribution heterogeneity offers niche opportunities for species with different functional traits to develop and potentially coexist. Available light (photosynthetically active radiation or PAR) for suspended algae (phytoplankton) may fluctuate greatly over time and space. Species-specific light acquisition traits capture important aspects of the ecophysiology of phytoplankton and characterize species growth at either limiting or saturating daily PAR supply. Efforts have been made to explain phytoplankton coexistence using species-specific light acquisition traits under constant light...

Data from: Proto-cooperation: group hunting sailfish improve hunting success by alternating attacks on grouping prey

James E. Herbert-Read, Pawel Romanczuk, Stefan Krause, Daniel Strömbom, Pierre Couillaud, Paolo Domenici, Ralf H.J.M. Kurvers, Stefano Marras, John F. Steffensen, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Jens Krause, Alexander D. M. Wilson & Ralf H. J. M. Kurvers
We present evidence of a novel form of group hunting. Individual sailfish (Istiophorus platypterus) alternate attacks with other group members on their schooling prey (Sardinella aurita). While only 24% of attacks result in prey capture, multiple prey are injured in 95% of attacks, resulting in an increase of injured fish in the school with the number of attacks. How quickly prey are captured is positively correlated with the level of injury of the school, suggesting...

Fish abundance data in forest steppe and grassland river networks in Mongolia

Alain Maasri, Mark Pyron, Emily Arsenault, James Thorp, Bud Mendsaikhan, Flavia Tromboni, Mario Minder, Scott Kenner, John Costello, Sudeep Chandra, Amarbat Otgonganbat & Bazartseren Boldgiv
Fish abundance data (fish per m) collected during the MACRO project in Mongolia. We collected fish assemblages in river networks of two different ecoregions, the Forest Steppe (FS) and Grassland (G), in 2017 and 2019.

Data from: Population differentiation of zander (Sander lucioperca, Linnaeus, 1758) across native and newly colonized ranges suggests increasing admixture in the course of an invasion

Erik Eschbach, Arne W. Nolte, Klaus Kohlmann, Petra Kersten, Robert Arlinghaus & Jochem Kail
In addition to ecological factors, evolutionary processes can determine the invasion success of a species. In particular, genetic admixture has the potential to induce rapid evolutionary change, which can result from natural or human-assisted secondary contact between differentiated populations. We studied the recent range expansion of zander in Germany focusing on the interplay between invasion and genetic admixture. Historically, the rivers Elbe and Danube harboured the most north-western source populations from which a north-westward range...

Data from: Response of bats to light with different spectra: light-shy and agile bat presence is affected by white and green, but not red light

Kamiel Spoelstra, Roy H. A. Van Grunsven, Jip J. C. Ramakers, Kim B. Ferguson, Thomas Raap, Maurice Donners, Elmar M. Veenendaal & Marcel E. Visser
Artificial light at night has shown a remarkable increase over the past decades. Effects are reported for many species groups, and include changes in presence, behaviour, physiology and life-history traits. Among these, bats are strongly affected, and how bat species react to light is likely to vary with light colour. Different spectra may therefore be applied to reduce negative impacts. We used a unique set-up of eight field sites to study the response of bats...

Data from: Population structure of a microparasite infecting Daphnia: spatio-temporal dynamics

, , , , &
Background: Detailed knowledge of spatial and temporal variation in the genetic population structure of hosts and parasites is required for understanding of hostparasite coevolution. As hot-spots of contemporary coevolution in natural systems are difficult to detect and long-term studies are restricted to few systems additional population genetic data from various hostparasite systems may provide important insights into the topic. This is particularly true for parasites as these players have been under-investigated so far due to...

Data from: Warming advances top-down control and reduces producer biomass in a freshwater plankton community

Mandy Velthuis, Lisette N. De Senerpont Domis, Thijs Frenken, Susanne Stephan, Garabet Kazanjian, Ralf Aben, Sabine Hilt, Sarian Kosten, Ellen Van Donk & Dedmer B. Van De Waal
Global warming has been shown to affect ecosystems worldwide. Warming may, for instance, disrupt plant herbivore synchrony and bird phenology in terrestrial systems, reduce primary production in oceans, and promote toxic cyanobacterial blooms in freshwater lakes. Responses of communities will not only depend on direct species-specific temperature effects, but also on indirect effects related to bottom-up and top-down processes. Here, we investigated the impact of warming on freshwater phytoplankton community dynamics, and assessed the relative...

Data from: The QRS (Quantification of Representative Sequences) pipeline for amplicon sequencing: case study on within-population ITS1 sequence variation in a microparasite infecting Daphnia

Enrique Gonzalez-Tortuero, Jakub Rusek, Adam Petrusek, Sabine Giessler, Dimitrios Lyras, Sonja Grath, Federico Castro-Monzon & Justyna Wolinska
Next generation sequencing (NGS) platforms are replacing traditional molecular biology protocols like cloning and Sanger sequencing. However, accuracy of NGS platforms has rarely been measured when quantifying relative frequencies of genotypes or taxa within populations. Here we developed a new bioinformatic pipeline (QRS) that pools similar sequence variants and estimates their frequencies in NGS data sets from populations or communities. We tested whether the estimated frequency of representative sequences, generated by 454 amplicon sequencing, differs...

Data from: Molecular phylogeny of the cyprinid tribe Labeonini (Teleostei: Cypriniformes)

Lei Yang, M. Arunachalam, Tetsuya Sado, Boris A. Levin, Alexander S. Golubtsov, Jörg Freyhof, John P. Friel, Wei-Jen Chen, M. Vincent Hirt, Raja Manickam, Mary K. Agnew, Andrew M. Simons, Kenji Saitoh, Masaki Miya, Richard L. Mayden & Shunping He
The cyprinid tribe Labeonini (sensu Rainboth, 1991) is a large group of freshwater fishes containing around 40 genera and 400 species. They are characterized by an amazing diversity of modifications to their lips and associated structures. In this study, a total of 34 genera and 142 species of putative members of this tribe, which represent most of the generic diversity and more than one third of the species diversity of the group, were sampled and...

Data from: Metabarcoding vs. morphological identification to assess diatom diversity in environmental studies

Jonas Zimmermann, Gernot Glöckner, Regine Jahn, Neela Enke & Birgit Gemeinholzer
Diatoms are frequently used for water quality assessments; however, identification to species level is difficult, time-consuming and needs in-depth knowledge of the organisms under investigation, as nonhomoplastic species-specific morphological characters are scarce. We here investigate how identification methods based on DNA (metabarcoding using NGS platforms) perform in comparison to morphological diatom identification and propose a workflow to optimize diatom fresh water quality assessments. Diatom diversity at seven different sites along the course of the river...

Data from: Behavioural individuality in clonal fish arises despite near-identical rearing conditions

David Bierbach, Kate L. Laskowski & Max Wolf
Behavioural individuality is thought to be caused by differences in genes and/or environmental conditions. Therefore, if these sources of variation are removed, individuals are predicted to develop similar phenotypes lacking repeatable individual variation. Moreover, even among genetically identical individuals, direct social interactions are predicted to be a powerful factor shaping the development of individuality. We use tightly controlled ontogenetic experiments with clonal fish, the Amazon molly (Poecilia formosa), to test whether near-identical rearing conditions and...

Data from: Behavioural and fitness effects of translocation to a novel environment: whole-lake experiments in two aquatic top predators

Christopher Monk, Bernard Chéret, Philipp Czapla, Daniel Hühn, Thomas Klefoth, Erik Eschbach, Robert Hagemann & Robert Arlinghaus
Translocation into a novel environment through common fisheries-management practices, such as fish stocking, provides opportunities to study behavioural and fitness impacts of translocations at realistic ecological scales. The process of stocking, as well as the unfamiliarity with novel ecological conditions and the interactions with resident fish may affect translocated individuals, leading to alterations of behaviours and causing fitness impacts. Our objectives were to investigate how aquatic top-predators behaviourally establish themselves and compete with resident individuals...

An unbiased molecular approach using 3’UTRs resolves the avian family-level tree of life

Heiner Kuhl, Carolina Frankl-Vilches, Antje Bakker, Gerald Mayr, Gerhard Nikolaus, Stefan Boerno, Sven Klages, Bernd Timmermann & Manfred Gahr
Presumably, due to a rapid early diversification, major parts of the higher-level phylogeny of birds are still resolved controversially in different analyses or are considered unresolvable. To address this problem, we produced an avian tree of life, which includes molecular sequences of one or several species of ∼ 90% of the currently recognized family-level taxa (429 species, 379 genera) including all 106 for the non-passerines and 115 for the passerines (Passeriformes). The unconstrained analyses of...

Data from: Daphnia galeata and D. dentifera are geographically and ecologically separated whereas their hybrids occur in intermediate habitats: a survey of 44 Chinese lakes

Xiaolin Ma, Wei Hu, Petr Smilauer, Mingbo Yin & Justyna Wolinska
The idea that hybridization promotes range expansion has received recent attention, but support from field studies is limited. We hypothesized that in the cladoceran waterflea Daphnia, parental species are geographically and ecologically separated, whereas hybrids occupy intermediate or occasionally extreme environments, potentially facilitating range expansion of parental species. We assessed the distribution of Daphnia dentifera, D. galeata and their interspecific hybrids across 44 lakes in China (using mitochondrial and microsatellite markers), and related it to...

Data from: Importance of latrine communication in European rabbits shifts along a rural–to–urban gradient

Madlen Ziege, David Bierbach, Svenja Bischoff, Anna-Lena Brandt, Mareike Brix, Bastian Greshake, Stefan Merker, Sandra Wenninger, Torsten Wronski & Martin Plath
BACKGROUND: Information transfer in mammalian communication networks is often based on the deposition of excreta in latrines. Depending on the intended receiver(s), latrines are either formed at territorial boundaries (between-group communication) or in core areas of home ranges (within-group communication). The relative importance of both types of marking behavior should depend, amongst other factors, on population densities and social group sizes, which tend to differ between urban and rural wildlife populations. Our study is the...

Data from: Empirical evidence for species-specific export of fish naïveté from a no-take marine protected area in a coastal recreational hook and line fishery

Josep Alós, Antoni Puiggrós, Carlos Díaz-Gil, Miquel Palmer, Rosario Rosselló & Robert Arlinghaus
No-take marine protected areas (MPAs) are assumed to enhance fisheries catch via the “spillover” effect, where biomass is exported to adjacent exploited areas. Recent studies in spearfishing fisheries suggest that the spillover of gear-naïve individuals from protected to unprotected sites increases catch rates outside the boundaries of MPAs. Whether this is a widespread phenomenon that also holds for other gear types and species is unknown. In this study, we tested if the distance to a...

Data from: Empirical evidence for large X-effects in animals with undifferentiated sex chromosomes

Christophe Dufresnes, Tomasz Majtyka, Stuart J. E. Baird, Jörn F. Gerchen, Amaël Borzée, Romain Savary, Maria Ogielska, Nicolas Perrin & Matthias Stöck
Reproductive isolation is crucial for the process of speciation to progress. Sex chromosomes have been assigned a key role in driving reproductive isolation but empirical evidence from natural population processes has been restricted to organisms with degenerated sex chromosomes such as mammals and birds. Here we report restricted introgression at sex-linked compared to autosomal markers in a hybrid zone between two incipient species of European tree frog, Hyla arborea and H. orientalis, whose homologous X...

Data from: Guppies occupy consistent positions in social networks: mechanisms and consequences

Stefan Krause, Alexander D.M. Wilson, Indar W. Ramnarine, James E. Herbert-Read, Romain J.G. Clément & Jens Krause
The social network approach has focused increasing attention on the complex web of relationships found in animal groups and populations. As such, network analysis has been used frequently to identify the role that particular individuals play in their social interactions and this approach has led to the question of whether, and in what context, individuals consistently occupy certain positions within their network. Here we investigated the social networks of guppies, Poecilia reticulata, in the wild...

Data from: Warming enhances sedimentation and decomposition of organic carbon in shallow macrophyte-dominated systems with zero net effect on carbon burial

Mandy Velthuis, Sarian Kosten, Ralf Aben, Garabet Kazanjian, Sabine Hilt, Edwin T. H. M. Peeters, Ellen Van Donk & Elisabeth S. Bakker
Temperatures have been rising throughout recent decades and are predicted to rise further in the coming century. Global warming affects carbon cycling in freshwater ecosystems, which both emit and bury substantial amounts of carbon on a global scale. Currently, most studies focus on the effect of warming on overall carbon emissions from freshwater ecosystems, while net effects on carbon budgets may strongly depend on burial in sediments. Here, we tested whether year‐round warming increases the...

Data from: Widespread increases in iron concentration in European and North American freshwaters

Caroline Björnerås, Gesa A. Weyhenmeyer, Chris D. Evans, Mark O. Gessner, Hans-Peter Grossart, Külli Kangur, Ilga Kokorite, Pirkko Kortelainen, Hjalmar Laudon, Jouni Lehoranta, Noah Lottig, Don T. Monteith, Peter Nõges, Tiina Nõges, Filip Oulehle, Gunnhild Riise, James A. Rusak, Antti Räike, Janis Sire, Shannon Sterling & Emma Kritzberg
Recent reports of increasing iron (Fe) concentrations in freshwaters are of concern, given the fundamental role of Fe in biogeochemical processes. Still, little is known about the frequency and geographical distribution of Fe trends, or about the underlying drivers. We analyzed temporal trends of Fe concentrations across 340 water bodies distributed over 10 countries in northern Europe and North America in order to gain a clearer understanding of where, to what extent, and why Fe...

Data from: Woodstoich III: integrating tools of nutritional geometry and ecological stoichiometry to advance nutrient budgeting and the prediction of consumer-driven nutrient recycling

Erik Sperfeld, Halvor M. Halvorson, Matthew Malishev, Fiona J. Clissold & Nicole D. Wagner
Within the last two decades, ecological stoichiometry (ES) and nutritional geometry (NG, also known as geometric framework for nutrition) have delivered novel insights into core questions of nutritional ecology. These two nutritionally explicit frameworks differ in the ‘nutrient currency’ used and the focus of their past research; behavioural feeding strategies in NG, mainly investigating terrestrial organisms, and trophic ecology in ES, mainly in aquatic settings. However, both NG and ES have developed in explaining patterns...

Data from: Assessing patterns in introduction pathways of alien species by linking major invasion databases

Wolf-Christian Saul, Helen E. Roy, Olaf Booy, Lucilla Carnevali, Hsuan-Ju Chen, Piero Genovesi, Colin A. Harrower, Philip E. Hulme, Shyama Pagad, Jan Pergl & Jonathan M. Jeschke
1. Preventing the arrival of invasive alien species (IAS) is a major priority in managing biological invasions. However, information on introduction pathways is currently scattered across many databases that often use different categorisations to describe similar pathways. This hampers the identification and prioritisation of pathways in order to meet the main targets of recent environmental policies. 2. Therefore, we integrate pathway information from two major IAS databases, IUCN's Global Invasive Species Database (GISD) and the...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    1
  • 2020
    7
  • 2019
    3
  • 2018
    10
  • 2017
    16
  • 2016
    19
  • 2015
    10
  • 2014
    7
  • 2013
    2
  • 2012
    1

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    77

Affiliations

  • Leibniz Institute of Freshwater Ecology and Inland Fisheries
    77
  • Freie Universität Berlin
    12
  • Humboldt University of Berlin
    8
  • University of Lausanne
    7
  • Fudan University
    5
  • Ludwig Maximilian University of Munich
    5
  • Swiss Federal Institute of Aquatic Science and Technology
    4
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    3
  • Nederlands Instituut voor Ecologie
    3
  • Charles University
    3