49 Works

Methane fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada

M.A. Cooper, C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset contains methane fluxes from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Methane fluxes were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus and thawing features of peatland plateaus.

Soil dates using 210Pb in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soils dated using 210Pb in profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil cores were sampled during early summer in 2013 and 2014 from peatland plateaus, thawing peatland plateaus, burnt and unburnt black spruce forests in Yukon and Northwest Territories. The upper part of the soil profile was dated using 210Pb to quantify recent carbon accumulation rates.

Aquatic carbon and greenhouse gas concentrations in the Auchencorth Moss catchment following drain blocking

K.J. Dinsmore, O. Murphey, F. Leith & J. Carfrae
This dataset contains concentrations of dissolved organic carbon, inorganic carbon, CO2, CH4 and N2O in the Black Burn stream which drains Auchencorth Moss peatland in South East Scotland. Concentrations and fluxes have been measured within the Black Burn on an approximately weekly to fortnightly basis from approximately 2006 to present (see https://doi.org/10.5285/3f0820a7-a8c8-4dd7-a058-8db79ba9c7fe). Concentrations in this dataset are from a series of new sites, upstream of the long-term sampling record, adjacent to an area of drains...

Data from: How reliably can we infer diversity-dependent diversification from phylogenies?

Rampal S. Etienne, Alex L. Pigot, Albert Phillimore & Albert B. Phillimore
Slowdowns in lineage accumulation in phylogenies suggest that speciation rates decline as diversity increases. Likelihood methods have been developed to detect such diversity dependence. However, a thorough test of whether such approaches correctly infer diversity dependence is lacking. Here, we simulate phylogenetic branching under linear negative diversity-dependent and diversity-independent models and estimate from the simulated phylogenies the maximum-likelihood parameters for three different conditionings – on survival of the birth–death process given the crown age, on...

Data from: Differential gene expression according to race and host plant in the pea aphid

Isobel Eyres, Julie Jaquiéry, Akiko Sugio, Ludovic Duvaux, Karim Gharbi, Jing-Jiang Zhou, Fabrice Legeai, Michaela Nelson, Jean-Christophe Simon, Carole M. Smadja, Roger Butlin & Julia Ferrari
Host-race formation in phytophagous insects is thought to provide the opportunity for local adaptation and subsequent ecological speciation. Studying gene expression differences amongst host races may help to identify phenotypes under (or resulting from) divergent selection and their genetic, molecular and physiological bases. The pea aphid (Acyrthosiphon pisum) comprises host races specializing on numerous plants in the Fabaceae and provides a unique system for examining the early stages of diversification along a gradient of genetic...

Data from: Recombination changes at the boundaries of fully and partially sex-linked regions between closely related Silene species pairs

Jose L. Campos, Suo Qiu, Sara Guirao-Rico, Roberta Bergero & Deborah Charlesworth
The establishment of a region of suppressed recombination is a critical change during sex chromosome evolution, leading to such properties as Y (and W) chromosome genetic degeneration, accumulation of repetitive sequences and heteromorphism. Although chromosome inversions can cause large regions to have suppressed recombination, and inversions are sometimes involved in sex chromosome evolution, gradual expansion of the non-recombining region could potentially sometimes occur. We here test whether closer linkage has recently evolved between the sex-determining...

Data from: Trait-demography relationships underlying small mammal population fluctuations

Koen J. Van Benthem, Hannah Froy, Tim Coulson, Lowell L. Getz, Madan K. Oli & Arpat Ozgul
Large-scale fluctuations in abundance are a common feature of small mammal populations and have been the subject of extensive research. These demographic fluctuations are often associated with concurrent changes in the average body mass of individuals, sometimes referred to as the ‘Chitty effect’. Despite the long-standing recognition of this phenomenon, an empirical investigation of the underlying coupled dynamics of body mass and population growth has been lacking. Using long-term life-history data combined with a trait-based...

Data from: Conserved genetic architecture underlying recombination rate variation in a wild population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries)

Susan E. Johnston, Camillo Bérénos, Jon Slate & Josephine M. Pemberton
Meiotic recombination breaks down linkage disequilibrium and forms new haplotypes, meaning that it is an important driver of diversity in eukaryotic genomes. Understanding the causes of variation in recombination rate is important in interpreting and predicting evolutionary phenomena and for understanding the potential of a population to respond to selection. However, despite attention in model systems, there remains little data on how recombination rate varies at the individual level in natural populations. Here, we used...

Bulk density, carbon and nitrogen content in soil profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of measurements of bulk density, carbon and nitrogen content in soil profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil cores were sampled during early summer in 2013 and 2014. Soil cores were sampled from a peatland plateau and thawing features of the peatland plateau, and from an unburnt and burnt black spruce forest, and additional sites in Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Soil respired radiocarbon as CO2 and CH4 from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset contains measures of soil respired radiocarbon as CO2 and CH4 from peatland plateaus and thawing peatland plateaus and from burnt and unburnt forests from permafrost in subarctic Canada. The radiocarbon content of soil respired CO2 and CH4 was measured during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, thawing features of peatland plateaus and unburnt and burnt black spruce forests.

Data from: Accounting for female space sharing in St. Kilda Soay sheep (Ovis aries) results in little change in heritability estimates

Charlotte E. Regan, Jill G. Pilkington, Camillo Bérénos, Josephine M. Pemberton, Per T. Smiseth & Alastair J. Wilson
When estimating heritability in free-living populations, it is common practice to account for common environment effects, because of their potential to generate phenotypic covariance among relatives thereby biasing heritability estimates. In quantitative genetic studies of natural populations, however, philopatry, which results in relatives being clustered in space, is rarely accounted for. The two studies to have done so suggest absolute declines in heritability estimates of up to 43% when accounting for space sharing by relatives....

Data from: Relative costs of offspring sex and offspring survival in a polygynous mammal

Hannah Froy, Craig A. Walling, Josephine M. Pemberton, Tim H. Clutton-Brock, Loeske E.B. Kruuk & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
Costs of reproduction are expected to be ubiquitous in wild animal populations and understanding the drivers of variation in these costs is an important aspect of life-history evolution theory. We use a 43 year dataset from a wild population of red deer to examine the relative importance of two factors that influence the costs of reproduction to mothers, and to test whether these costs vary with changing ecological conditions. Like previous studies, our analyses indicate...

Data from: The genome of the yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis reveals insights into the basis of parasitism and virulence

Sebastian Eves-Van Den Akker, Dominik Laetsch, Peter Thorpe, Catherine Lilley, Etienne Danchin, Martine Da Rocha, Corinne Rancurel, Nancy Holroyd, James Cotton, Amir Szitenberg, Eric Grenier, Josselin Montarry, Benjamin Mimee, Marc-Olivier Duceppe, Ian Boyes, Jessica Marvin, Laura Jones, Hazijah Yusup, Joël Lafond-Lapalme, Magali Esquibet, Michael Sabeh, Michael Rott, Hein Overmars, Anna Finkers-Tomczak, Geert Smant … & John Jones
Background: The yellow potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis is a devastating plant pathogen of global economic importance. This biotrophic parasite secretes effectors from pharyngeal glands, some of which were acquired by horizontal gene transfer, to manipulate host processes and promote parasitism. G. rostochiensis is classified into pathotypes with different plant resistance-breaking phenotypes. Results: We generate a high-quality genome assembly for G. rostochiensis pathotype Ro1, identify putative effectors and horizontal gene transfer events, map gene expression...

Data from: Rodents: food or pests in Neolithic Orkney

Andrzej A. Romaniuk, Alexandra N. Shepherd, David V. Clarke, Alison J. Sheridan, Sheena Fraser, László Bartosiewicz & Jeremy S. Herman
Rodents have important effects on contemporary human societies, sometimes providing a source of food but more often as agricultural pests, or as vectors and reservoirs of disease. Skeletal remains of rodents are commonly found in archaeological assemblages from around the world, highlighting their potential importance to ancient human populations. However, there are few studies of the interactions between people and rodents at such sites and most of these are confined to locations where rodents have...

Data from: Distribution and abundance of glucocorticoid and mineralocorticoid receptors throughout the brain of the great tit Parus major

Rebecca A. Senft, Simone L. Meddle & Alexander T. Baugh
The glucocorticoid stress response, regulated by the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, enables individuals to cope with stressors through transcriptional effects in cells expressing the appropriate receptors. The two receptors that bind glucocorticoids—the mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) and glucocorticoid receptor (GR)—are present in a variety of vertebrate tissues, but their expression in the brain is especially important. Neural receptor patterns have the potential to integrate multiple behavioral and physiological traits simultaneously, including self-regulation of glucocorticoid secretion through negative...

Data from: Multihost Bartonella parasites display covert host specificity even when transmitted by generalist vectors

Susan M. Withenshaw, Godefroy Devevey, Amy B. Pedersen & Andy Fenton
Many parasites infect multiple sympatric host species, and there is a general assumption that parasite transmission between co-occurring host species is commonplace. Such between-species transmission could be key to parasite persistence within a disease reservoir and is consequently an emerging focus for disease control. However, while a growing body of theory indicates the potential importance of between-species transmission for parasite persistence, conclusive empirical evidence from natural communities is lacking, and the assumption that between-species transmission...

Data from: Marker-dependent associations among oxidative stress, growth and survival during early life in a wild mammal

Louise L. Christensen, Colin Selman, Jonathan D. Blount, Jill G. Pilkington, Kathryn A. Watt, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jane M. Reid & Daniel H. Nussey
Oxidative stress (OS) is hypothesized to be a key physiological mechanism mediating life-history trade-offs, but evidence from wild populations experiencing natural environmental variation is limited. We tested the hypotheses that increased early life growth rate increases OS, and that increased OS reduces first-winter survival, in wild Soay sheep (Ovis aries) lambs. We measured growth rate and first-winter survival for four consecutive cohorts, and measured two markers of oxidative damage (malondialdehyde (MDA), protein carbonyls (PC)) and...

Data from: Cellular and humoral immunity in a wild mammal: Variation with age & sex and association with overwinter survival

Rebecca L. Watson, Tom N. McNeilly, Kathryn A. Watt, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jill G. Pilkington, Martin Waterfall, Phoebe R. T. Hopper, Daniel Cooney, Rose Zamoyska, Daniel H. Nussey & Phoebe R.T. Hopper
Immune defenses are expected to be crucial for survival under the considerable parasite pressures experienced by wild animals. However, our understanding of the association between immunity and fitness in nature remains limited due to both the complexity of the vertebrate immune system and the often-limited availability of immune reagents in nonmodel organisms. Here, we use methods and reagents developed by veterinary researchers for domestic ungulates on blood samples collected from a wild Soay sheep population,...

Data from: Sibling competition does not exacerbate inbreeding depression in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Natalie Pilakouta, Daniel J. Sieber & Per T. Smiseth
Inbreeding results from matings between relatives and can cause a reduction in offspring fitness, known as inbreeding depression. Previous work has shown that a wide range of environmental stresses, such as extreme temperatures, starvation, and parasitism, can exacerbate inbreeding depression. It has recently been argued that stresses due to intraspecific competition should have a stronger effect on the severity of inbreeding depression than stresses due to harsh physical conditions. Here, we tested whether an increase...

Soil temperature profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This dataset consists of soil temperature profiles from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil temperature profiles were monitored during summer in 2013 and 2014 in Yukon and Northwest Territories. Monitored sites included peatland plateaus, thawing features of peatland plateaus, unburnt and burnt black spruce forests, and additional sites.

Soil thaw depth from permafrost in subarctic Canada

C. Estop-Aragones, J.P. Fisher, M.A. Cooper, A. Thierry, R. Treharne, J.B. Murton, G.K. Phoenix, D.J. Charman, M. Williams & I.P. Hartley
This datasets contains measures of soil thaw depth from permafrost in subarctic Canada. Soil thaw depth was measured in 2013 and 2014 in sites from Yukon and Northwest Territories.

Data from: Spatially coordinated dynamic gene transcription in living pituitary tissue

Karen Featherstone, Kirsty Hey, Hiroshi Momiji, Anne V. McNamara, Amanda L. Patist, Joanna Woodburn, David G. Spiller, Helen C. Christian, Alan S. McNeilly, John J. Mullins, Barbel F. Finkenstadt, David A. Rand, Michael R. H. White & Julian R. E. Davis
Transcription at individual genes in single cells is often pulsatile and stochastic. A key question emerges regarding how this behaviour contributes to tissue phenotype, but it has been a challenge to quantitatively analyse this in living cells over time, as opposed to studying snap-shots of gene expression state. We have used imaging of reporter gene expression to track transcription in living pituitary tissue. We integrated live-cell imaging data with statistical modelling for quantitative real-time estimation...

Data from: Cohort variation in individual body mass dissipates with age in large herbivores

Sandra Hamel, Jean-Michel Gaillard, Nigel G. Yoccoz, Steve Albon, Steeve D. Côté, Joseph M. Craine, Marco Festa-Bianchet, Mathieu Garel, Phyllis Lee, Cynthia Moss, Daniel H. Nussey, Fanie Pelletier, Audun Stien & Torkild Tveraa
Environmental conditions experienced during early growth and development markedly shape phenotypic traits. Consequently, individuals of the same cohort may show similar life-history tactics throughout life. Conditions experienced later in life, however, could fine-tune these initial differences, either increasing (cumulative effect) or decreasing (compensatory effect) the magnitude of cohort variation with increasing age. Our novel comparative analysis that quantifies cohort variation in individual body size trajectories shows that initial cohort variation dissipates throughout life, and that...

Data from: Comparative analysis of Begonia plastid genomes and their utility for species-level phylogenetics

Catherine Kidner, Nicola Harrison, Richard Harrison, Richard J. Harrison & Catherine A. Kidner
Recent, rapid radiations make species-level phylogenetics difficult to resolve. We used a multiplexed, high-throughput sequencing approach to identify informative genomic regions to resolve phylogenetic relationships at low taxonomic levels in Begonia from a survey of sixteen species. A long-range PCR method was used to generate draft plastid genomes to provide a strong phylogenetic backbone, identify fast evolving regions and provide informative molecular markers for species-level phylogenetic studies in Begonia.

Data from: Origins of the 2009 H1N1 influenza pandemic in swine in Mexico

Ignacio Mena, Martha I. Nelson, Francisco Quezada-Monroy, Jayeeta Dutta, Refugio Cortes-Fernández, J. Horacio Lara-Puente, Felipa Castro-Peralta, Luis F. Cunha, Nídia Sequeira-Trovão, Bernardo Lozano-Dubernard, Andrew Rambaut, Harm Van Bakel & Adolfo García-Sastre
Asia is considered an important source of influenza A virus (IAV) pandemics, owing to large, diverse viral reservoirs in poultry and swine. However, the zoonotic origins of the 2009 A/H1N1 influenza pandemic virus (pdmH1N1) remain unclear, due to conflicting evidence from swine and humans. There is strong evidence that the first human outbreak of pdmH1N1 occurred in Mexico in early 2009. However, no related swine viruses have been detected in Mexico or any part of...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    49

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    49

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    49
  • University of Exeter
    13
  • University of Sheffield
    12
  • University of Sussex
    10
  • University of Cambridge
    4
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • Ghent University
    2
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    2
  • University of Glasgow
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2