55 Works

Data from: Measuring selection when parents and offspring interact

Caroline E. Thomson & Jarrod D. Hadfield
Non-social and social selection gradients are key evolutionary parameters in systems where individuals interact. They are most easily obtained by regressing an individual's fitness on the trait values of the individual and its social partner. In the context of parental care it is more common to regress the trait value of the parents (i.e. the social partner) on a ‘mixed’ fitness measure that is a function of the parent's and offspring's fitness (for example, the...

Data from: The effect of sex on the repeatability of evolution in different environments

Josianne Lachapelle & Nick Colegrave
The adaptive function of sex has been extensively studied, while less consideration has been given to the potential downstream consequences of sex on evolution. Here, we investigate one such potential consequence, the effect of sex on the repeatability of evolution. By affecting the repeatability of evolution, sex could have important implications for biodiversity, and for our ability to make predictions about the outcome of environmental change. We allowed asexual and sexual populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii...

Data from: Female Soay sheep do not adjust their maternal care behaviour to the quality of their home range

Charlotte E. Regan, Jill G. Pilkington & Per T. Smiseth
Resource availability, through its impact on the costs and benefits of parental care, is expected to influence parental care behaviour. There has, to our knowledge, been no attempt to understand how variation in the resource use of wild individuals influences individual parental care behaviour. To understand how natural resource variability affects maternal care in female St. Kilda Soay sheep, we selected 69 females whose home ranges varied in quality (measured as the mean percentage cover...

Data from: Evidence for selection-by-environment but not genotype-by-environment interactions for fitness-related traits in a wild mammal population

Adam Hayward, Josephine Pemberton, Camillo Berenos, Alastair J. Wilson, Jill G. Pilkington, Loeske E.B. Kruuk, Josephine M. Pemberton & Adam D. Hayward
How do environmental conditions influence selection and genetic variation in wild populations? There is widespread evidence for selection-by-environment interactions (S*E), but we reviewed studies of natural populations estimating the extent of genotype-by-environment interactions (G*E) in response to natural variation in environmental conditions, and found that evidence for G*E appears to be rare within single populations in the wild. Studies estimating the simultaneous impact of environmental variation on both selection and genetic variation are especially scarce....

Qualitative data on socio-economic characteristics from ten villages in Gurue, Mozambique

F. Lupera, M. Carvalho, S. Baumert & F. Vollmer
This dataset contains the transcripts of interviews and discussion groups from ten villages in the Gurue district, Zambezia province, Mozambique. The ten villages were selected from a land scarcity gradient running from villages with abundant land to those with intense land constraints, mainly driven by expanding agricultural activities and population density. The villages had similar infrastructure, soils, rainfall, and vegetation types. The dataset contains information on participatory mapping of the village characteristics, seasonality, how agricultural...

The seed set of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced into habitats comprising different floral cover

T.M. Evans, M.S. Heard, A.J. Vanbergen, S. Cavers & R. Ennos
This dataset contains seed counts of Eschscholzia californica plants introduced to form experimental arrays within habitats comprising different floral cover. Data was collected in June 2015 at the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire, UK. Experimental arrays comprised of three E.californica plants separated by 1m and arranged in a triangular formation. A total of sixteen arrays were introduced across four 100 hectare replicate blocks, each separated by >500m. At the centre of each block, four experimental arrays were...

Boreal forest floor greenhouse gas emissions across a wildfire-disturbed chronosequence

K.E. Mason, S. Oakley, L.E. Street, M. Arróniz-Crespo, D.L. Jones, T.H. DeLuca & N.J. Ostle
Data collected during field experiments to investigate the effect of wildfires on greenhouse gas emissions across forests of differing ages in Sweden. Data comprise greenhouse gas measurements, soil horizon depth, bulk density, loss on ignition, pH, soil phosphorus, carbon and nitrogen, plant species cover, air temperature, soil temperature, soil moisture and surface leaf moisture. Greenhouse gas measurements were taken in the field. Soil cores were collected, then processed and analysed in the laboratory. Plant species...

Social data on human wildlife conflict in ten rural communities of Marrupa, Northern Mozambique

M. Carvalho, F. Lupera, R. Nhamussua, S.N. Lisboa, C. Ryan & N. Ribeiro
This dataset includes the transcript of discussion group activities on Human Wildlife conflict, conducted with ten rural communities in Marrupa District, Niassa (Northern Mozambique). It also comprises the results of semi-structured interviews conducted individually in three of the ten selected communities. The ten villages were selected from a forest cover gradient running from villages with a higher forest cover to those within degraded forest areas and consequently low cover. The villages had similar infrastructure, soils,...

Pollinator data from pan traps located in habitats comprising different floral cover in Buckinghamshire, UK

T.M. Evans, M.S. Heard, A.J. Vanbergen, S. Cavers & R. Ennos
This dataset contains a list of pollinator species caught within pan traps from habitats comprising different floral cover. Data were collected from the Hillesden estate, Buckinghamshire in June 2015. Surveys were conducted alongside four experimental arrays of the Californian poppy, Eschscholzia californica, located with two habitats; a sown wildflower mix and bare, fallow ground. This set-up was repeated over four 100ha blocks separated at a distance greater than 500m. Pan traps comprised three water-filled circular...

Data from: The dentary of Wareolestes rex (Megazostrodontidae): a new specimen from Scotland and implications for morganucodontan tooth replacement

Elsa Panciroli, Roger B. J. Benson & Stig Walsh
The Middle Jurassic morganucodontan, Wareolestes rex, was previously known from only four isolated molars from Kirtlington, England. There has been debate over the position of the holotype tooth as an upper or lower molar. We describe a new Wareolestes specimen from the Kilmaluag Formation of Scotland: a partial left dentary with two erupted molars, one unerupted molar and three unerupted premolars. Empty alveoli for a canine, p1 and p3 are also present. Through detailed comparison...

Data from: Contrasting drivers of reproductive ageing in albatrosses

Hannah Froy, Sue Lewis, Daniel H. Nussey, Andrew G. Wood & Richard A. Phillips
1.Age-related variation in reproductive performance is ubiquitous in wild vertebrate populations and has important consequences for population and evolutionary dynamics. 2.The ageing trajectory is shaped by both within-individual processes, such as improvement and senescence, and by the among-individual effects of selective appearance and disappearance. To date, few studies have compared the role of these different drivers among species or populations. 3.In this study, we use nearly 40 years of longitudinal monitoring data to contrast the...

Data from: The route of infection determines Wolbachia antibacterial protection in Drosophila

Vanika Gupta, Radhakrishnan B. Vasanthakrishnan, Jonathon Siva-Jothy, Katy M. Monteith, Sam P. Brown & Pedro F. Vale
Bacterial symbionts are widespread among metazoans and provide a range of beneficial functions. Wolbachia-mediated protection against viral infection has been extensively demonstrated in Drosophila. In mosquitoes that are artificially transinfected with Drosophila melanogaster Wolbachia (wMel), protection from both viral and bacterial infections has been demonstrated. However, no evidence for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection has been demonstrated in Drosophila to date. Here, we show that the route of infection is key for Wolbachia-mediated antibacterial protection. Drosophila melanogaster...

Data from: What controls variation in carbon use efficiency among Amazonian tropical forests?

Christopher E. Doughty, Gregory R. Goldsmith, Nicolas Raab, Cecile A. J. Girardin, Filio Farfan-Amezquita, Walter Huaraca Huasco, Javier E. Silva-Espejo, Alejandro Araujo-Murakami, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Wanderley Rocha, David Galbraith, Patrick Meir, Dan B. Metcalfe, Yadvinder Malhi & Walter Huaraca-Huasco
Why do some forests produce biomass more efficiently than others? Variations in Carbon Use Efficiency (CUE: total Net Primary Production (NPP)/ Gross Primary Production (GPP)) may be due to changes in wood residence time (Biomass/NPPwood), temperature, or soil nutrient status. We tested these hypotheses in 14, one ha plots across Amazonian and Andean forests where we measured most key components of net primary production (NPP: wood, fine roots, and leaves) and autotrophic respiration (Ra; wood,...

Data from: Estimating the parameters of background selection and selective sweeps in Drosophila in the presence of gene conversion

José Luis Campos, Lei Zhao & Brian Charlesworth
We used whole-genome resequencing data from a population of Drosophila melanogaster to investigate the causes of the negative correlation between the within-population synonymous nucleotide site diversity (πS) of a gene and its degree of divergence from related species at nonsynonymous nucleotide sites (KA). By using the estimated distributions of mutational effects on fitness at nonsynonymous and UTR sites, we predicted the effects of background selection at sites within a gene on πS and found that...

Data from: Body macronutrient composition is predicted by lipid and not protein content of the diet

Joshua P. Moatt, Catherine Hambly, Elizabeth Heap, Anna Kramer, Fiona Moon, John R. Speakman & Craig A. Walling
1. Diet is an important determinant of fitness related traits including growth, reproduction and survival. Recent work suggests that variation in protein : lipid ratio, particularly the amount of protein, in the diet is a key nutritional parameter. However, the traits that mediate the link between dietary macronutrient ratio and fitness related traits are less well understood. An obvious candidate is body composition, given its well-known link to health. 2. Here we investigate the relationship...

Local tree names, uses and species identification in Mozambique

E. Woollen, I Grundy, A. Bechel, C.M. Ryan, O. Nhaduco, I.A. Daude, A.A. Manguiao, A.A. Da Costa, S.N. Lisboa, J.F. Junior, L. Mutemba, A. Pais, M. Zavale, S. Cumbula, H. Xerinda, H. Buque, D. Meneses, C. Rodrigues, A.M. Mário, N. Ribeiro, L.P. Domingos, A. Mbandze, F. Armando & P. Jennings
The dataset includes lists of local tree names, tree species identification and local uses of trees in seventeen different villages across three Districts in Mozambique, Africa. We collated species lists from seven villages in Mabalane District, Gaza Province, ten villages in Marrupa District, Niassa Province, and ten villages in Gurue District Zambezia Province. Data were collected in Mabalane between May-Sep 2014, Marrupa between May-Aug 2015, and Gurue between Sep-Dec 2015. Lists of local tree names...

Data from: Does fuel type influence the amount of charcoal produced in wildfires? Implications for the fossil record

Victoria A. Hudspith, Rory M. Hadden, Alastair I. Bartlett & Claire M. Belcher
Charcoal occurrence is extensively used as a tool for understanding wildfires over geological timescales. Yet, the fossil charcoal literature to date rarely considers that fire alone is capable of creating a bias in the abundance and nature of charcoal it creates, before it even becomes incorporated into the fossil record. In this study we have used state-of-the-art calorimetry to experimentally produce charcoal from twenty species that represent a range of surface fuels and growth habits,...

Data from: Related herbivore species show similar temporal dynamics

F. Guillaume Blanchet, Tomas Roslin, Masahito T. Kimura, Tea Huotari, Riikka Kaartinen, Sofia Gripenberg & Ayco J. M. Tack
1.Within natural communities, different taxa display different dynamics in time. Why this is the case we do not fully know. This thwarts our ability to predict changes in community structure, which is important for both the conservation of rare species in natural communities and for the prediction of pest outbreaks in agriculture. 2.Species sharing phylogeny, natural enemies and/or life history traits have been hypothesized to share similar temporal dynamics. We operationalized these concepts into testing...

Data from: Chimpanzee intellect: personality, performance and motivation with touchscreen tasks

Drew M. Altschul, Emma K. Wallace, Ruth Sonnweber, Masaki Tomonaga, Alex Weiss & Alexander Weiss
Human intellect is characterized by intercorrelated psychological domains, including intelligence, academic performance and personality. Higher openness is associated with higher intelligence and better academic performance, yet high performance among individuals is itself attributable to intelligence, not openness. High conscientiousness individuals, although not necessarily more intelligent, are better performers. Work with other species is not as extensive, yet animals display similar relationships between exploration- and persistence-related personality traits and performance on cognitive tasks. However, previous studies...

Data from: Genetic characterization of dog personality traits

Joanna Ilska, Marie J. Haskell, Sarah C. Blott, Enrique Sanchez-Molano, Zita Polgar, Sarah E. Lofgren, Dylan N. Clements & Pamela Wiener
The genetic architecture of behavioural traits in dogs is of great interest to owners, breeders and professionals involved in animal welfare, as well as to scientists studying the genetics of animal (including human) behaviour. The genetic component of dog behaviour is supported by between-breed differences and some evidence of within-breed variation. However, it is a challenge to gather sufficiently large datasets to dissect the genetic basis of complex traits such as behaviour, which are both...

Data from: Environmental modification via a quorum sensing molecule influences the social landscape of siderophore production

Roman Popat, Freya Harrison, Ana C. Da Silva, Scott A.S. Easton, Luke McNally, Paul Williams, Stephen P. Diggle & Scott A. S. Easton
Bacteria produce a wide variety of exoproducts that favourably modify their environment and increase their fitness. These are often termed ‘public goods’ because they are costly for individuals to produce and can be exploited by non-producers (cheats). The outcome of conflict over public goods is dependent upon the prevailing environment and the phenotype of the individuals in competition. Many bacterial species use quorum sensing (QS) signalling molecules to regulate the production of public goods. QS,...

Data from: Canine brachycephaly is associated with a retrotransposon-mediated missplicing of SMOC2

Thomas W. Marchant, Edward J. Johnson, Lynn McTeir, Craig I. Johnson, Adam Gow, Tiziana Liuti, Dana Kuehn, Karen Svenson, Mairead L. Bermingham, Michaela Drögemüller, Marc Nussbaumer, Megan G. Davey, David J. Argyle, Roger M. Powell, Sérgio Guilherme, Johann Lang, Gert Ter Haar, Tosso Leeb, Tobias Schwarz, Richard J. Mellanby, Dylan N. Clements & Jeffrey J. Schoenebeck
In morphological terms, “form” is used to describe an object’s shape and size. In dogs, facial form is stunningly diverse. Facial retrusion, the proximodistal shortening of the snout and widening of the hard palate is common to brachycephalic dogs and is a welfare concern, as the incidence of respiratory distress and ocular trauma observed in this class of dogs is highly correlated with their skull form. Progress to identify the molecular underpinnings of facial retrusion...

Data from: A new subfamily classification of the Leguminosae based on a taxonomically comprehensive phylogeny

, Anne Bruneau, Nasim Azani, Marielle Babineau, Edeline Gagnon, Carole Sinou, Royce Steeves, Erin Zimmerman, C. Donovan Bailey, Lynsey Kovar, Madhugiri Nageswara-Rao, Hannah Banks, RuthP. Clark, Manuel De La Estrella, Peter Gasson, GeoffreyC. Kite, BenteB. Klitgaard, GwilymP. Lewis, Danilo Neves, Gerhard Prenner, María De Lourdes Rico-Arce, ArianeR. Barbosa, Maria Cristina López-Roberts, Luciano Paganucci De Queiroz, PétalaG. Ribeiro … & Tingshuang Yi
The classification of the legume family proposed here addresses the long-known non-monophyly of the traditionally recognised subfamily Caesalpinioideae, by recognising six robustly supported monophyletic subfamilies. This new classification uses as its framework the most comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of legumes to date, based on plastid matK gene sequences, and including near-complete sampling of genera (698 of the currently recognised 765 genera) and ca. 20% (3696) of known species. The matK gene region has been the most...

Data from: Females manipulate behavior of caring males via prenatal maternal effects

Matthieu Paquet & Per T. Smiseth
In species with biparental care, there is sexual conflict as each parent is under selection to minimize its personal effort by shifting as much as possible of the workload over to the other parent. Most theoretical and empirical work on the resolution of this conflict has focused on strategies used by both parents, such as negotiation. However, because females produce the eggs, this might afford females with an ability to manipulate male behavior via maternal...

Data from: Virus resistance is not costly in a marine alga evolving under multiple environmental stressors

Sarah Heath, Kirsten Knox, Pedro Vale & Sinead Collins
Viruses are important evolutionary drivers of host ecology and evolution. The marine picoplankton Ostreococcus tauri has three known resistance types that arise in response to infection with the Phycodnavirus OtV5: susceptible cells (S) that lyse following viral entry and replication; resistant cells (R) that are refractory to viral entry; and resistant producers (RP) that do not all lyse but maintain some viruses within the population. To test for evolutionary costs of maintaining antiviral resistance, we...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    55

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    55

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    55
  • University of Oxford
    8
  • Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    7
  • University of Nottingham
    3
  • University of Toronto
    3
  • Universidade Lurio
    3
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    2
  • Australian National University
    2