51 Works

Data from: Estimating selection on the act of inbreeding in a population with strong inbreeding depression

Eva Troianou, Jisca Huisman, Josephine M. Pemberton & Craig A. Walling
Inbreeding depression is widely regarded as a driving force in the evolution of dispersal, mate choice and sperm selection. However, due to likely costs of inbreeding avoidance, which are poorly understood, it is unclear to what extent selection to avoid inbreeding is expected in nature. Moreover, there are currently very few empirical estimates of the strength of selection against the act of inbreeding (mating with a relative), as opposed to the fitness costs of being...

Data from: Inbreeding, inbreeding depression and infidelity in a cooperatively-breeding bird

Gabriela Karolina Hajduk, Andrew Cockburn, Nicolas Margraf, Helen L. Osmond, Craig A. Walling, Loeske E.B. Kruuk & Loeske E. B. Kruuk
Inbreeding depression plays a major role in shaping mating systems: in particular, inbreeding avoidance is often proposed as a mechanism explaining extra-pair reproduction in socially-monogamous species. This suggestion relies on assumptions which are rarely comprehensively tested: that inbreeding depression is present, that higher kinship between social partners increases infidelity, and that infidelity reduces the frequency of inbreeding. Here, we test these assumptions using 26 years of data for a cooperatively-breeding, socially-monogamous bird with high female...

Data from: No evidence for parent-offspring competition in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Francesca E. Gray, Jon Richardson, Tom Ratz & Per T. Smiseth
In species where family members share a limited pool of resources, there may be competition between parents and their dependent offspring for access to these resources. Parent-offspring competition may impose a cost to family living that would constrain the evolution of parental care and family living. Yet, few studies have tested for evidence of parent-offspring competition. Here we test for parent-offspring competition in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. This species breeds on carcasses of small...

Data from: Tracking of host defenses and phylogeny during the radiation of Neotropical Inga-Feeding sawflies (Hymenoptera; Argidae)

María-José Endara, James A. Nicholls, Phyllis D. Coley, Dale L. Forrister, Gordon C. Younkin, Kyle G. Dexter, Catherine A. Kidner, R. Toby Pennington, Graham N. Stone & Thomas A. Kursar
Coevolutionary theory has long predicted that the arms race between plants and herbivores is a major driver of host selection and diversification. At a local scale, plant defenses contribute significantly to the structure of herbivore assemblages and the high alpha diversity of plants in tropical rain forests. However, the general importance of plant defenses in host associations and divergence at regional scales remains unclear. Here, we examine the role of plant defensive traits and phylogeny...

Data from: Molecular palaeontology illuminates the evolution of ecdysozoan vision

James F. Fleming, Reinhardt M. Kristensen, Martin V. Sørensen, Tae-Yoon S. Park, Kazuharu Arakawa, Mark Blaxter, Lorena Rebecchi, Roberto Guidetti, Tom A. Williams, Nicholas W. Roberts, Jakob Vinther & Davide Pisani
Colour vision is known to have arisen only twice – once in Vertebrata and once within the Ecdysozoa, in Arthropoda. However, the evolutionary history of ecdysozoan vision is unclear. At the molecular level, visual pigments, composed of a chromophore and a protein belonging to the opsin family, have different spectral sensitivities and these mediate colour vision. At the morphological level, ecdysozoan vision is conveyed by eyes of variable levels of complexity; from the simple ocelli...

Data from: Distinguishing the victim from the threat: SNP‐based methods reveal the extent of introgressive hybridization between wildcats and domestic cats in Scotland and inform future in situ and ex situ management options for species restoration

Helen V. Senn, Muhammad Ghazali, Jennifer Kaden, David Barcaly, Ben Harrower, Ruairidh D. Campbell, David W. MacDonald, Andrew C. Kitchener & David Barclay
The degree of introgressive hybridisation between the Scottish wildcat and domestic cat has long been suspected to be advanced. Here we use a 35-SNP-marker test, designed to assess hybridisation between wildcat and domestic cat populations in Scotland, to assess a database of 265 wild-living and captive cat samples, and test the assumptions of the test using 3097 SNP markers generated independently in a subset of the data using ddRAD. We discovered that despite increased genetic...

Data from: Quantification and decomposition of environment-selection relationships

Darren Clarke Hunter, Josephine M. Pemberton, Jill G. Pilkington & Michael B. Morrissey
In nature, selection varies across time in most environments, but we lack an understanding of how specific ecological changes drive this variation. Ecological factors can alter phenotypic selection coefficients through changes in trait distributions or individual mean fitness, even when the trait-absolute fitness relationship remains constant. We apply and extend a regression-based approach in a population of Soay sheep (Ovis aries) and suggest metrics of environment-selection relationships that can be compared across studies. We then...

Data from: Personality links with lifespan in chimpanzees

Drew M Altschul, William D Hopkins, Elizabeth S Herrelko, Miho Inoue-Murayama, Tetsuro Matsuzawa, James E King, Stephen R Ross & Alexander Weiss
Life-history strategies for optimizing individual fitness fall on a spectrum between maximizing reproductive efforts and maintaining physical health over time. Strategies across this spectrum are viable and different suites of personality traits have evolved to support these strategies. Using personality and survival data from 538 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) we tested whether any of the dimensions of chimpanzee personality - agreeableness, conscientiousness, dominance, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness - were associated with longevity, an attribute of...

Data from: Adaptive periodicity in the infectivity of malaria gametocytes to mosquitoes

Petra Schneider, Samuel S.C. Rund, Natasha L. Smith, Kimberley F. Prior, Aidan J. O'Donnell, Sarah E. Reece & Samuel S. C. Rund
Daily rhythms in behaviour, physiology, and molecular processes are expected to enable organisms to appropriately schedule activities according to consequences of the daily rotation of the Earth. For parasites, this includes capitalizing on periodicity in transmission opportunities and for hosts/vectors, this may select for rhythms in immune defence. We examine rhythms in the density and infectivity of transmission forms (gametocytes) of rodent malaria parasites in the host’s blood, parasite development inside mosquito vectors, and potential...

Data from: Using molecular phylogenies in island biogeography: it’s about time

Luis Valente, Albert B. Phillimore & Rampal S. Etienne
Island biogeography aims at inferring the processes that govern the assembly of communities in space and time. Molecular phylogenies can tell us about the timings of island colonisations and diversification, but have rarely been used for the estimation of colonisation, speciation and extinction rates on islands. In this study we illustrate the effects of including phylogenetic information with the Galápagos avifauna. We find that by including colonisation times we obtain much more precise and accurate...

Data from: The evolution of colour polymorphism in British winter‐active Lepidoptera in response to search image use by avian predators

Jamie Conor Weir
Phenotypic polymorphism in cryptic species is widespread. This may evolve in response to search image use by predators exerting negative frequency‐dependent selection on intraspecific colour morphs, “apostatic selection”. Evidence exists to indicate search image formation by predators and apostatic selection operating on wild prey populations, though not to demonstrate search image use directly resulting in apostatic selection. The present study attempted to address this deficiency, using British Lepidoptera active in winter as a model system....

Data from: CHIIMP: an automated high-throughput microsatellite genotyping approach reveals greater allelic diversity in wild chimpanzees

Hannah J. Barbian, Andrew Jesse Connell, Alexa N. Avitto, Ronnie M. Russell, Andrew G. Smith, Madhurima S. Gundlapally, Alexander L. Shazad, Yingying Li, Frederic Bibollet-Ruche, Emily E. Wroblewski, Deus Mjungu, Elizabeth V. Lonsdorf, Fiona A. Stewart, Alexander K. Piel, Anne E. Pusey, Paul M. Sharp & Beatrice H. Hahn
Short tandem repeats (STRs), also known as microsatellites, are commonly used to non-invasively genotype wild-living endangered species, including African apes. Until recently, capillary electrophoresis has been the method of choice to determine the length of polymorphic STR loci. However, this technique is labor intensive, difficult to compare across platforms, and notoriously imprecise. Here we developed a MiSeq-based approach and tested its performance using previously genotyped fecal samples from long-term studied chimpanzees in Gombe National Park,...

Data from: Tuberculosis in people newly diagnosed with HIV at a large HIV care and treatment center in Northwest Cameroon: burden, comparative screening and diagnostic yields, and patient outcomes

Eyongetah T. Mbu, Florian Sauter, Alexander Zoufaly, Barend M. De C. Bronsvoort, Kenton L. Morgan, Jurgen Noeske, Jean-Louis F. Abena & Melissa S. Sander
Background Diagnosis of tuberculosis in people living with HIV is challenging due to non-specific clinical presentations and inadequately sensitive diagnostic tests. The WHO recommends screening using a clinical algorithm followed by rapid diagnosis using the Xpert MTB/RIF assay, and more information is needed to evaluate these recommendations in different settings. Methods From August 2012 to September 2013, consecutive adults newly diagnosed with HIV in Bamenda, Cameroon, were screened for TB regardless of symptoms by smear...

Data from: Reconciling nutritional geometry with classical dietary restriction: effects of nutrient intake, not calories, on survival and reproduction

Joshua P. Moatt, Murray A. Fyfe, Elizabeth Heap, Luke J.M. Mitchell, Fiona Moon & Craig A. Walling
Dietary restriction (DR) is one of the main experimental paradigms to investigate the mechanisms that determine lifespan and ageing. Yet, the exact nutritional parameters responsible for DR remain unclear. Recently, the advent of the geometric framework of nutrition (GF), has refocussed interest from calories to dietary macronutrients. However, GF experiments focus on invertebrates, with the importance of macronutrients in vertebrates still widely debated. This has led to the suggestion of a fundamental difference in the...

Data from: Interplay between age-based competitive asymmetries within the brood and direct competition between inbred and outbred offspring in a burying beetle

Mhairi Miller, Tom Ratz, Jon Richardson & Per T. Smiseth
Theory suggests that intraspecific competition associated with direct competition between inbred and outbred individuals should be an important determinant of the severity of inbreeding depression. The reason is that, if outbred individuals are stronger competitors than inbred ones, direct competition should have a disproportionate effect on the fitness of inbred individuals. However, an individual’s competitive ability is not only determined by its inbreeding status but also by competitive asymmetries that are independent of an individual’s...

Data from: Mutational load, inbreeding depression and heterosis in subdivided populations

Brian Charlesworth
This paper examines the extent to which empirical estimates of inbreeding depression and inter-population heterosis in subdivided populations, as well as the effects of local population size on mean fitness, can be explained in terms of current estimates of mutation rates, and the distribution of selection coefficients against deleterious mutations provided by population genomics data. Using population genetics models, numerical predictions of the genetic load, inbreeding depression and heterosis were obtained for a broad range...

Data from: Effects of variation in resource acquisition during different stages of the life cycle on life-history traits and trade-offs in a burying beetle

Jon Richardson & Per T. Smiseth
Individual variation in resource acquisition should have consequences for life-history traits and trade-offs between them because such variation determines how many resources can be allocated to different life-history functions, such as growth, survival and reproduction. Since resource acquisition can vary across an individual’s life cycle, the consequences for life-history traits and trade-offs may depend on when during the life cycle resources are limited. We tested for differential and/or interactive effects of variation in resource acquisition...

Data from: Genetic diversity, breed composition and admixture of Kenyan domestic pigs

Fidalis D. Mujibi, Edward Okoth, Evans K. Cheruiyot, Cynthia Onzere, Richard P. Bishop, Eric M. Fèvre, Lian Thomas, Charles Masembe, Graham Plastow & Max Rothschild
The genetic diversity of African pigs, whether domestic or wild has not been widely studied and there is very limited published information available. Available data suggests that African domestic pigs originate from different domestication centers as opposed to international commercial breeds. We evaluated two domestic pig populations in Western Kenya, in order to characterize the genetic diversity, breed composition and admixture of the pigs in an area known to be endemic for African swine fever...

Data from: Shock and stabilisation following long-term drought in tropical forest from 15 years of litterfall dynamics

Lucy Rowland, Antonio C. L. Da Costa, Alex A. R. Oliveira, Samuel S. Almeida, Leandro V. Ferreira, Yadvinder Malhi, Dan B. Metcalfe, Maurizio Mencuccini, John Grace & Patrick Meir
Litterfall dynamics in tropical forests are a good indicator of overall tropical forest function, indicative of carbon invested in both photosynthesising tissues and reproductive organs such as flowers and fruits. These dynamics are sensitive to changes in climate, such as drought, but little is known about the long-term responses of tropical forest litterfall dynamics to extended drought stress. We present a 15-year dataset of litterfall (leaf, flower and fruit, and twigs) from the world's only...

Data from: Inbred burying beetles suffer fitness costs from making poor decisions

Jon Richardson, Pauline Comin & Per T. Smiseth
There is a growing interest in how environmental conditions, such as resource availability, can modify the severity of inbreeding depression. However, little is known about whether inbreeding depression is associated with differences in individual decision-making. For example, decisions about how many offspring to produce are also often based upon the prevailing environmental conditions, such as resource availability, and getting these decisions wrong may have important fitness consequences for both parents and offspring. We tested for...

Data from: Inter- and intra-specific genomic divergence in Drosophila montana shows evidence for cold adaptation

Darren J. Parker, R. Axel W. Wiberg, Urmi Trivedi, Venera I. Tyukmaeva, Karim Gharbi, Roger K. Butlin, Anneli Hoikkala, Maaria Kankare & Michael G. Ritchie
D. montana gff fileGenome annotation file for D. montana genome (Accession number: LUVX00000000)D.mont_freeze_v1.4.gff.txt

Data from: Developing reduced SNP assays from whole-genome sequence data to estimate introgression in an organism with complex genetic patterns, the Iberian honeybee (Apis mellifera iberiensis)

Dora Henriques, Melanie Parejo, Alain Vignal, David Wragg, Andreas Wallberg, Matthew Webster, M. Alice Pinto & Matthew T. Webster
The most important managed pollinator, the honeybee (Apis mellifera L.), has been subject to a growing number of threats. In Western Europe one such threat is large-scale introductions of commercial strains (C-lineage ancestry), which is leading to introgressive hybridization and even the local extinction of native honeybee populations (M-lineage ancestry). Here, we developed reduced assays of highly informative SNPs from 176 whole genomes to estimate C-lineage introgression in the most diverse and evolutionarily complex subspecies...

Data from: Differential effects of offspring and maternal inbreeding on egg laying and offspring performance in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides

Lucy E. Ford, Kirsten J. Henderson & Per T. Smiseth
We investigate the effect of offspring and maternal inbreeding on maternal and offspring traits associated with early offspring fitness in the burying beetle Nicrophorus vespilloides. We conducted two experiments. In the first experiment, we manipulated maternal inbreeding only (keeping offspring outbred) by generating mothers that were outbred, moderately inbred or highly inbred. Meanwhile, in the second experiment, we manipulated offspring inbreeding only (keeping females outbred) by generating offspring that were outbred, moderately inbred or highly...

Static chamber measurements of nitrous oxide flux from Sourhope field experiment site, Scotland, 2000-2001 [NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme]

C.A. Davies & U. Skiba
The dataset comprises nitrous oxide (N2O) flux data, collected from static chambers as part of a study to determine how land management affected nitrogen cycling by nitrifiers and denitrifiers in an upland agricultural grassland soil and to determine the effects of changing environmental conditions on nitric and nitrous oxide production and emission as a result of land management. Data were collected during a project funded under the NERC Soil Biodiversity Programme, established in 1999 and...

Data from: Genetics and genomics of an unusual selfish sex ratio distortion in an insect

Phineas T. Hamilton, Christina N. Hodson, Caitlin I. Curtis & Steve J. Perlman
Diverse selfish genetic elements have evolved the ability to manipulate reproduction to increase their transmission, and this can result in highly distorted sex ratios. Indeed, one of the major explanations for why sex determination systems are so dynamic is because they are shaped by ongoing coevolutionary arms races between sex ratio distorting elements and the rest of the genome. Here, we use genetic crosses and genome analysis to describe an unusual sex ratio distortion with...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    51

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    51

Affiliations

  • University of Edinburgh
    50
  • University of Cambridge
    3
  • Australian National University
    3
  • University of St Andrews
    3
  • University of Oxford
    3
  • National Museum
    2
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Royal Zoological Society of Antwerp
    2
  • National Museums Scotland
    2
  • Duke University
    2