17 Works

Data from: Atmospheric rivers and the mass mortality of wild oysters: insight into an extreme future?

Brian S. Cheng, Andrew L. Chang, Anna Deck & Matthew C. Ferner
Climate change is predicted to increase the frequency and severity of extreme events. However, the biological consequences of extremes remain poorly resolved owing to their unpredictable nature and difficulty in quantifying their mechanisms and impacts. One key feature delivering precipitation extremes is an atmospheric river (AR), a long and narrow filament of enhanced water vapour transport. Despite recent attention, the biological impacts of ARs remain undocumented. Here, we use biological data coupled with remotely sensed...

Data from: Repeated invasions into the twilight zone: evolutionary origins of a novel assemblage of fishes from deep Caribbean reefs

Luke Tornabene, James Van Tassell, D. Ross Robertson & Carole C. Baldwin
Mesophotic and deeper reefs of the tropics are poorly known and underexplored ecosystems worldwide. Collectively referred to as the ‘twilight zone’, depths below ~30–50 m are home to many species of reef fishes that are absent from shallower depths, including many undescribed and endemic species. We currently lack even a basic understanding of the diversity and evolutionary origins of fishes on tropical mesophotic reefs. Recent submersible collections in the Caribbean have provided new specimens that...

Data from: Spider phylogenomics: untangling the spider tree of life

Jason Bond, Nicole L. Garrison, Juanita Rodriguez, Ingi Agnarsson, Jonathan A. Coddington, Charles E. Griswold, Christopher A. Hamilton, Marshal Hedin, Kevin Kocot, Joel M. Ledford & Jason E. Bond
Spiders (Order Araneae) are massively abundant generalist arthropod predators that are found in nearly every ecosystem on the planet and have persisted for over 380 million years. Spiders have long served as evolutionary models for studying complex mating and web spinning behaviors, key innovation and adaptive radiation hypotheses, and have been inspiration for important theories like sexual selection by female choice. Unfortunately, past major attempts to reconstruct spider phylogeny typically employing the “usual suspect” genes...

Abu Dhabi Blue Carbon project

Lisa Schile, J. Boone Kauffman, J. Patrick Megonigal, James Fourqurean & Stephen Crooks
Coastal ecosystems produce and sequester significant amounts of carbon (‘blue carbon’), which has been well documented in humid and semi-humid regions of temperate and tropical climates but less so in arid regions where mangroves, marshes, and seagrasses exist near the limit of their tolerance for extreme temperature and salinity. To better understand these unique systems, we measured whole-ecosystem carbon stocks (above- and belowground biomass and soil) in 58 sites across the United Arab Emirates in...

Data from: Natural selection and genetic diversity in the butterfly Heliconius melpomene

Simon Henry Martin, Markus Möst, William J. Palmer, Camilo Salazar, W. Owen McMillan, Francis Michael Jiggins & Chris D. Jiggins
A combination of selective and neutral evolutionary forces shape patterns of genetic diversity in nature. Among the insects, most previous analyses of the roles of drift and selection in shaping variation across the genome have focused on the genus Drosophila. A more complete understanding of these forces will come from analysing other taxa that differ in population demography and other aspects of biology. We have analysed diversity and signatures of selection in the neotropical Heliconius...

Data from: Phylotranscriptomics resolves ancient divergences in the Lepidoptera

Adam L. Bazinet, Kim T. Mitter, Donald R. Davis, Erik J. Van Nieukerken, Michael P. Cummings & Charles Mitter
Classic morphological studies of the oldest, so-called nonditrysian lineages of Lepidoptera yielded a well-resolved phylogeny, supported by the stepwise origin of the traits characterizing the clade Ditrysia, which contains over 98% of extant lepidopterans. Subsequent polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based molecular studies have robustly supported many aspects of the morphological hypothesis and strongly contradicted others, while leaving some relationships unsettled. Here we bring the greatly expanded gene sampling of RNA-Seq to bear on nonditrysian phylogeny, especially...

Data from: A molecular phylogeny and revised higher-level classification for the leaf-mining moth family Gracillariidae and its implications for larval host-use evolution

Akito Y. Kawahara, David Plotkin, Issei Ohshima, Carlos Lopez-Vaamonde, Peter R. Houlihan, Jesse W. Breinholt, Atsushi Kawakita, Lei Xiao, Jerome C. Regier, Donald R. Davis, Tosio Kumata, Jay-Cheon Sohn, Jurate De Prins, Charles Mitter & JAE-CHEON SOHN
Gracillariidae are one of the most diverse families of internally feeding insects, and many species are economically important. Study of this family has been hampered by lack of a robust and comprehensive phylogeny. In the present paper, we sequenced up to 22 genes in 96 gracillariid species, representing all previously recognized subfamilies and genus groups, plus 20 outgroups representing other families and superfamilies. Following objective identification and removal of two rogue taxa, two datasets were...

Data from: How do cuticular hydrocarbons evolve? Physiological constraints and climatic and biotic selection pressures act on a complex functional trait

Florian Menzel, Bonnie B. Blaimer & Thomas Schmitt
Cuticular hydrocarbons (CHCs) cover the cuticles of virtually all insects, serving as a waterproofing agent and as a communication signal. The causes for the high CHC variation between species, and the factors influencing CHC profiles, are scarcely understood. Here, we compare CHC profiles of ant species from seven biogeographic regions, searching for physiological constraints and for climatic and biotic selection pressures. Molecule length constrained CHC composition: long-chain profiles contained fewer linear alkanes, but more hydrocarbons...

Data from: Intraspecific variation in body size does not alter the effects of mesopredators on prey

Austin J. Gallagher, Simon J. Brandl & Adrian C. Stier
As humans continue to alter the species composition and size structure of marine food webs, it is critical to understand size-dependent effects of predators on prey. Yet, how shifts in predator body size mediate the effect of predators is understudied in tropical marine ecosystems, where anthropogenic harvest has indirectly increased the density and size of small-bodied predators. Here, we combine field surveys and a laboratory feeding experiment in coral reef fish communities to show that...

Data from: Cenozoic dynamics of shallow-marine biodiversity in the Western Pacific

Moriaki Yasuhara, Hokuto Iwatani, Gene Hunt, Hisayo Okahashi, Tomoki Kase, Hiroki Hayashi, Toshiaki Irizuki, Yolanda M. Aguilar, Allan Gil S. Fernando & Willem Renema
Aim: Cenozoic dynamics of large-scale species diversity patterns remain poorly understood, especially for the Western Pacific, in part, because of the paucity of well-dated fossil records from the tropics. This article aims to reveal the spatiotemporal dynamics of species diversity in the Western Pacific through the Cenozoic, focusing on the tropical Indo-Australian Archipelago (IAA) biodiversity hotspot. Location: Tropical and north-western Pacific Ocean. Methods: We analysed well-preserved fossil ostracodes from the tropical Western Pacific and combined...

Data from: High-throughput SNP genotyping of historical and modern samples of five bird species via sequence capture of ultraconserved elements

Haw Chuan Lim & Michael J. Braun
Sample availability limits population genetics research on many species, especially taxa from regions with high diversity. However, many such species are well represented in museum collections assembled before the molecular era. Development of techniques to recover genetic data from these invaluable specimens will benefit biodiversity science. Using a mixture of freshly preserved and historical tissue samples, and a sequence capture probe set targeting >5000 loci, we produced high-confidence genotype calls on thousands of single nucleotide...

Data from: Adaptive divergence despite strong genetic drift: genomic analysis of the evolutionary mechanisms causing genetic differentiation in the island fox (Urocyon littoralis)

W. Chris Funk, Robert E. Lovich, Paul A. Hohenlohe, Courtney A. Hofman, Scott A. Morrison, T. Scott Sillett, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Jesús E. Maldonado, Torben C. Rick, Mitch D. Day, Nicholas R. Polato, Sarah W. Fizpatrick, Timothy J. Coonan, Kevin R. Crooks, Adam Dillon, David K. Garcelon, Julie L. King, Christina L. Boser, Nicholas Gould, William F. Andelt & Sarah W. Fitzpatrick
The evolutionary mechanisms generating the tremendous biodiversity of islands have long fascinated evolutionary biologists. Genetic drift and divergent selection are predicted to be strong on islands and both could drive population divergence and speciation. Alternatively, strong genetic drift may preclude adaptation. We conducted a genomic analysis to test the roles of genetic drift and divergent selection in causing genetic differentiation among populations of the island fox (Urocyon littoralis). This species consists of six subspecies, each...

Data from: Isotopic niches support the resource breadth hypothesis

Jonathan A. Rader, Seth D. Newsome, Pablo Sabat, R. Terry Chesser, Michael E. Dillon & Carlos Martínez Del Rio
Because a broad spectrum of resource use allows species to persist in a wide range of habitat types, and thus permits them to occupy large geographical areas, and because broadly distributed species have access to more diverse resource bases, the resource breadth hypothesis posits that the diversity of resources used by organisms should be positively related with the extent of their geographic ranges. We investigated isotopic niche width in a small radiation of South American...

Data from: Tropical ancient DNA from bulk archaeological fish bone reveals the subsistence practices of a historic coastal community in southwest Madagascar

Alicia Grealy, Kristina Douglass, James Haile, Chriselle Bruwer, Charlotte Gough & Michael Bunce
Taxonomic identification of archaeological fish bones provides important insights into the subsistence practices of ancient coastal peoples. However, it can be difficult to execute robust morphological identification of fish bones from species-rich fossil assemblages, especially from post-cranial material with few distinguishing features. Fragmentation, weathering and burning further impede taxonomic identification, resulting in large numbers of unidentifiable bones from archaeological sites. This limitation can be somewhat mitigated by taking an ancient DNA (aDNA) bulk-bone metabarcoding (BBM)...

Data from: Deep COI sequencing of standardized benthic samples unveils overlooked diversity of Jordanian coral reefs in the Northern Red Sea

Mamoon M. D. Al-Rshaidat, Allison Snider, Sydney Rosebraugh, Amanda M. Devine, Thomas D. Devine, Laetitia Plaisance, Nancy Knowlton, Matthieu Leray & Mamoon M.D. Al-Rshaidat
High-Throughput Sequencing (HTS) of DNA barcodes (metabarcoding), particularly when combined with standardized sampling protocols, is one of the most promising approaches for censusing overlooked cryptic invertebrate communities. We present biodiversity estimates based on sequencing of the cytochrome c oxidase subunit 1 (COI) gene for coral reefs of the Gulf of Aqaba, a semi-enclosed system in the Northern Red Sea. Samples were obtained from standardized sampling devices [Autonomous Reef Monitoring Structures (ARMS)] deployed for 18 months....

Data from: Rising atmospheric CO2 is reducing the protein concentration of a floral pollen source essential for North American bees

Lewis H. Ziska, Jeffery S. Pettis, Joan Edwards, Jillian E. Hancock, Martha B. Tomecek, Andrew Clark, Jeffrey S. Dukes, Irakli Loladze & H. Wayne Polley
At present, there is substantive evidence that the nutritional content of agriculturally important food crops will decrease in response to rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide, Ca. However, whether Ca-induced declines in nutritional quality are also occurring for pollinator food sources is unknown. Flowering late in the season, goldenrod (Solidago spp.) pollen is a widely available autumnal food source commonly acknowledged by apiarists to be essential to native bee (e.g. Bombus spp.) and honeybee (Apis...

Data from: Transcriptome sequencing reveals genome-wide variation in molecular evolutionary rate among ferns

Amanda L. Grusz, Carl J. Rothfels & Eric Schuettpelz
Background: Transcriptomics in non-model plant systems has recently reached a point where the examination of nuclear genome-wide patterns in understudied groups is an achievable reality. This progress is especially notable in evolutionary studies of ferns, for which molecular resources to date have been derived primarily from the plastid genome. Here, we utilize transcriptome data in the first genome-wide comparative study of molecular evolutionary rate in ferns. We focus on the ecologically diverse family Pteridaceae, which...

Registration Year

  • 2016
    17

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    17

Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Institution
    17
  • University of Maryland, College Park
    3
  • National Museum of Natural History
    2
  • Naturalis Biodiversity Center
    2
  • National Museum
    1
  • University of Würzburg
    1
  • Kyoto Prefectural University
    1
  • Mokpo National University
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • Del Rosario University
    1