26 Works

Data from: Two pulses of morphological diversification in Pacific pelagic fishes following the Cretaceous–Palaeogene mass extinction

Elizabeth Sibert, Matthew Friedman, Pincelli Hull, Gene Hunt, Richard Norris & Matt Friedman
Molecular phylogenies suggest some major radiations of open-ocean fish clades occurred roughly coincident with the K/Pg boundary, however the timing and nature of this diversification is poorly constrained. Here we investigate evolutionary patterns in ray-finned fishes across the Cretaceous-Palaeogene (K/Pg) Mass Extinction 66 million years ago (Ma), using microfossils (isolated teeth) preserved in a South Pacific sediment core spanning 72-43 Ma. Our record does not show significant turnover of fish tooth morphotypes at the K/Pg...

Data from: Extinction risk in extant marine species integrating paleontological and biodistributional data

Katie S. Collins, Stewart M. Edie, Gene Hunt, Kaustuv Roy & David Jablonski
Extinction risk assessments of marine invertebrate species remain scarce, which hinders effective management of marine biodiversity in the face of anthropogenic impacts. In order to close this information gap, we developed a metric of relative extinction risk that combines paleontological data, in the form of extinction rates calculated from the fossil record, with two known correlates of risk in the modern day: geographic range size and realized thermal niche. We test the performance of this...

Data from: Paleotropical diversification dominates the evolution of the hyperdiverse ant tribe Crematogastrini (Hymenoptera: Formicidae)

Bonnie B. Blaimer, Philip S. Ward, Ted R. Schultz, Brian L. Fisher & Seán G. Brady
Levels of diversity vary strikingly among different phylogenetic lineages of ants. Rapid radiations in early ant evolution have often proven difficult to resolve with traditional Sanger-sequencing data sets of modest size. We provide a phylogenomic perspective on the evolution of the hyperdiverse ant tribe Crematogastrini by analyzing sequence data for nearly 1800 ultraconserved element (UCE) loci from 153 species comprising 56 genera. We reconstruct a next-to-complete genus-level phylogeny using concatenated maximum-likelihood and species-tree approaches, estimate...

Data from: Testing reticulate evolution of four Vitis species from East Asia using restriction‐site associated DNA sequencing

Zhi-Yao Ma, Jun Wen, Jing-Pu Tian, Abbas Jamal, Longqing Chen, Xiu-Qun Liu & Long-Qing Chen
Reticulate evolution is an important driving force of angiosperm evolution. It has been proposed as an important evolutionary process in Vitis subgenus Vitis. Events of natural hybridization and introgression of several taxa native to North America have been hypothesized and discussed. However, there is no convincing evidence of reticulate evolution reported for closely related Vitis taxa from East Asia. We aim to explore natural hybridization and introgression among four closely related Vitis taxa from East...

Data from: Ancient and contingent body shape diversification in a hyperdiverse fish radiation

Michael D. Burns & Brian L. Sidlauskas
Landmark DataTPS file containing landmark dataChapter 1_Disparity Data.TPSPhylogenetic TreeA nexus file containing the phylogenetic tree used in the phylogenetic comparative methods.Chapter 1_trees_final.nexusPrincipal Component scoresPrincipal Component scores used to construct the morphospace and also used in the mvMORPH analysis.Chapter 1_data_all PCs.csvPhylogeneticEM dataData used for PhylogeneticEM analysisChapter 1_PhylogeneticEM_data.csvConevol scriptScript used to run Conevol analysis in RChapter 1_Conevol.txtMVmorph scriptScript used to perform MVmorph analysis in RChapter 1_MVmorph.txtMVmorph_uncertainty scriptScript used to perform MVmorph analysis while accounting for uncertainty in...

Hawaiian forest bird foraging height

Erin Wilson Rankin, Jessie Knowlton, Daniel Gruner, David Flaspohler, Christian Giardina, Devin Leopold, Anna Buckhardt, William Pitt & Tadashi Fukami
Data relevant to study on the foraging height of Hawaiian forest birds collected in kipuka along the Saddle Road, Upper Waiakea Forest Reserve.

Data from: Pliocene-Pleistocene ecological niche evolution shapes the phylogeography of a Mediterranean plant group

Carmen Benítez Benítez, Marcial Escudero, Francisco Rodriguez-Sanchez, Santiago Martín-Bravo & Pedro Jiménez Mejías
Estimating species ability to adapt to environmental changes is crucial to understand their past and future response to climate change. The Mediterranean basin has experienced remarkable climatic changes since the Miocene, which have greatly influenced the evolution of the Mediterranean flora. Here we examine the evolutionary history and biogeographic patterns of two sedge sister species (Carex, Cyperaceae) restricted to the western Mediterranean basin, but with Pliocene fossil record in central Europe. In particular, we estimated...

Data from: Hyper-longirostry and kinematic disparity in extinct toothed whales

Matthew R. McCurry & Nicholas D. Pyenson
Toothed cetacean (Odontoceti) lineages in the Miocene and Pliocene evolved rostra that are proportionally more elongate than any other aquatic mammal or reptile, living or extinct. Their similarities in cranial proportions to billfish may suggest a convergent feeding style, where the rostrum is swept through the water to hit and stun prey. Here we calculated second moment of area from rostral cross-sections of these fossil odontocete taxa, as well as from extant ecological analogues, to...

Data from: Genome sequence and population declines in the critically endangered greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) and implications for conservation

Melissa T. R. Hawkins, Ryan R. Culligan, Cynthia L. Frasier, Rebecca B. Dikow, Ryan Hagenson, Runhua Lei &
Background: The greater bamboo lemur (Prolemur simus) is a member of the Family Lemuridae that is unique in their dependency on bamboo as a primary food source. This Critically Endangered species lives in small forest patches in eastern Madagascar, occupying a fraction of its historical range. Here we sequence the genome of the greater bamboo lemur for the first time, and provide genome resources for future studies of this species that can be applied across...

Data from: Quantifying the dark data in museum fossil collections as palaeontology undergoes a second digital revolution

Charles R. Marshall, Seth Finnegan, Erica C. Clites, Patricia A. Holroyd, Nicole Bonuso, Crystal Cortez, Edward Davis, Gregory P. Dietl, Patrick S. Druckenmiller, Ron C. Eng, Christine Garcia, Kathryn Estes-Smargiassi, Austin Hendy, Kathy A. Hollis, Holly Little, Elizabeth A. Nesbitt, Peter Roopnarine, Leslie Skibinski, Jann Vendetti & Lisa D. White
Large-scale analysis of the fossil record requires aggregation of palaeontological data from individual fossil localities. Prior to computers these synoptic datasets were compiled by hand, a laborious undertaking that took years of effort and forced palaeontologists to make difficult choices about what types of data to tabulate. The advent of desktop computers ushered in palaeontology’s first digital revolution – online literature-based databases, such as the Paleobiology Database (PBDB). However, the published literature represents only a...

Data from: Taxon cycle predictions supported by model-based inference in Indo-Pacific trap-jaw ants (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Odontomachus)

Pável Matos-Maraví, Nicholas J. Matzke, Fredrick J. Larabee, Ronald M. Clouse, Ward C. Wheeler, Daniela Magdalena Sorger, Andrew V. Suarez & Milan Janda
Non-equilibrium dynamics and non-neutral processes, such as trait-dependent dispersal, are often missing from quantitative island biogeography models despite their potential explanatory value. One of the most influential non-equilibrium models is the taxon cycle, but it has been difficult to test its validity as a general biogeographical framework. Here, we test predictions of the taxon-cycle model using six expected phylogenetic patterns and a time-calibrated phylogeny of Indo-Pacific Odontomachus (Hymenoptera: Formicidae: Ponerinae), one of the ant genera...

Data from: Comprehensive phylogeny of ray-finned fishes (Actinopterygii) based on transcriptomic and genomic data

Lily C. Hughes, Guillermo Ortí, Yu Huang, Ying Sun, Carole C. Baldwin, Andrew W. Thompson, Dahiana Arcila, Ricardo Betancur-R, Chenhong Li, Leandro Becker, Nicolás Bellora, Xiaomeng Zhao, Xiaofeng Li, Min Wang, Chao Fang, Bing Xie, Zhuocheng Zhou, Hai Huang, Songlin Chen, Byrappa Venkatesh & Qiong Shi
Our understanding of phylogenetic relationships among bony fishes has been transformed by analysis of a small number of genes, but uncertainty remains around critical nodes. Genome-scale inferences so far have sampled a limited number of taxa and genes. Here we leveraged 144 genomes and 159 transcriptomes to investigate fish evolution with an unparalleled scale of data: >0.5 Mb from 1,105 orthologous exon sequences from 303 species, representing 66 out of 72 ray-finned fish orders. We...

Data from: Trait independence primes convergent trait loss

Molly C. Womack, Tyler S. Fiero & Kim L. Hoke
The repeated, independent evolution of traits (convergent evolution) is often attributed to shared environmental selection pressures. However, developmental dependencies among traits can limit the phenotypic variation available to selection and bias evolutionary outcomes. Here we determine how changes in developmentally correlated traits may impact convergent loss of the tympanic middle ear, a highly labile trait within toads that currently lack adaptive explanation. The middle ear’s lability could reflect evolutionary trade-offs with other skull features under...

Presentation Panel on Metadata Standards

Andrea d'Andrea, Christina Harlow, Julie Hardesty & Jon Blundell
Examples of topics of interest- Why do we need metadata standards development? How are standards developed? Given the lack of agreed upon standards for 3D data, what solutions are institutions currently using? What are users’ needs regarding metadata? Who are the targeted users? What constitutes the minimal metadata for inclusion in a repository? How can linked metadata be developed for improved workflows. What would be required for data clean up or migration for previously unstandardized...

Data from: Before platelets: the production of platelet activating factor during growth and stress in a basal marine organism

Ines Galtier D’Auriac, Robert A. Quinn, Heather Maughan, Louis-Felix Nothias, Mark Little, Clifford A. Kapono, Ana Cobian Guemes, Brandon T. Reyes, Kevin Green, Steven D. Quistad, Matthieu Leray, Jennifer E. Smith, Pieter C. Dorrestein, Forest Rohwer, Dimitri D. Deheyn, Aaron C. Hartmann, Ana Cobian & Ines Galtier D'Auriac
Corals and humans represent two extremely disparate metazoan lineages and are therefore useful for comparative evolutionary studies. Two lipid-based molecules that are central to human immunity, platelet activating factor (PAF) and Lyso-PAF were recently identified in scleractinian corals. To identify processes in corals that involve these molecules, PAF and Lyso-PAF biosynthesis was quantified in conditions known to stimulate PAF production in mammals (tissue growth and exposure to elevated levels of ultraviolet light) and in conditions...

Data from: Archaeogenomic evidence from the southwestern US points to a pre-Hispanic scarlet macaw breeding colony

Richard J. George, Stephen Plof, Adam S. Watson, Kari L. Schmidt, Brandon J. Culleton, Thomas K. Harper, Patricia A. Gilman, Steven A. LeBlanc, George Amato, Peter Whiteley, Logan Kistler & Douglas J. Kennett
Hundreds of scarlet macaw (Ara macao cyanoptera) skeletons have been recovered from archaeological contexts in the southwestern United States and northwestern Mexico (SW/NW). The location of these skeletons, >1,000 km outside their Neotropical endemic range, has suggested a far-reaching pre-Hispanic acquisition network. Clear evidence for scarlet macaw breeding within this network is only known from the settlement of Paquimé in NW dating between 1250 and 1450 CE. Although some scholars have speculated on the probable...

Data from: Golden orbweavers ignore biological rules: phylogenomic and comparative analyses unravel a complex evolution of sexual size dimorphism

Matjaz Kuntner, Chris Hamilton, Ren-Chung Cheng, Matjaz Gregoric, Nik Lupse, Tjasa Lokovsek, Emily Moriarty Lemmon, Alan R. Lemmon, Ingi Agnarsson, Jonathan A. Coddington, Jason Bond, Chris A Hamilton & Jason E Bond
Instances of sexual size dimorphism (SSD) provide the context for rigorous tests of biological rules of size evolution, such as Cope’s Rule (phyletic size increase), Rensch’s Rule (allometric patterns of male and female size), as well as male and female body size optima. In certain spider groups, such as the golden orbweavers (Nephilidae), extreme female-biased SSD (eSSD, female:male body length ≥ 2) is the norm. Nephilid genera construct webs of exaggerated proportions, which can be...

Data from: Post-Cretaceous bursts of evolution along the benthic-pelagic axis in marine fishes

Emanuell Duarte Ribeiro, Aaron M. Davis, Rafael A. Rivero-Vega, Guillermo Ortí, Ricardo Betancur-R & Emanuell Ribeiro
Ecological opportunity arising in the aftermath of mass extinction events is thought to be a powerful driver of evolutionary radiations. Here, we assessed how the wake of the Cretaceous-Paleogene (K-Pg) mass extinction shaped diversification dynamics in a clade of mostly marine fishes (Carangaria), which comprises a disparate array of benthic and pelagic dwellers including some of the most astonishing fish forms (e.g., flatfishes, billfishes, remoras, archerfishes). Analyses of lineage diversification show time-heterogeneous rates of lineage...

Data from: Dispersal is associated with morphological innovation, but not increased diversification, in Cyphostemma (Vitaceae)

David J. Hearn, Margaret Evans, Ben Wolf, Michael McGinty & Jun Wen
Multiple processes - including dispersal, morphological innovation, and habitat change - are frequently cited as catalysts for increased diversification. We investigate these processes and the causal linkages among them in the genus Cyphostemma (Vitaceae), a clade comprising ~200 species that is unique in the Vitaceae for its diversity of growth habits. We reconstruct time-calibrated evolutionary relationships among 64 species in the genus using five nuclear and chloroplast markers, and infer the group’s morphological and biogeographic...

Data from: Multiple origins of sexual dichromatism and aposematism within large carpenter bees

Bonnie B. Blaimer, Jonathan R. Mawdsley & Seán G. Brady
The evolution of reversed sexual dichromatism and aposematic coloration have long been of interest to both theoreticians and empiricists. Yet despite the potential connections between these phenomena, they have seldom been jointly studied. Large carpenter bees (genus Xylocopa) are a promising group for such comparative investigations as they are a diverse clade in which both aposematism and reversed sexual dichromatism can occur either together or separately. We investigated the evolutionary history of dichromatism and aposematism...

Data from: Contributions toward understanding the biodiversity of Passiflora in North America: updates and a new combination from the Baja California Peninsula, Mexico and vicinity

Harlan T. Svoboda & AJ Harris
The Baja California Peninsula and surrounding landmasses harbor an abundant flora in an otherwise harsh and arid environment. Of the many plant groups native to this peninsular and insular region, passionflowers (Passiflora, Passifloraceae) are represented by a handful of taxa that all belong to a single lineage within the genus (section Dysosmia). Despite centuries of exploration and floristic research in the area, basic questions remain regarding this group—particularly the taxonomic status among the Passiflora arida...

Data from: Seascapes as drivers of herbivore assemblages in coral reef ecosystems

George Roff, Sonia Bejarano, Mark Priest, Alyssa Marshell, Iliana Chollett, Robert S. Steneck, Christopher Doropoulos, Yimnang Golbuu & Peter J. Mumby
Herbivorous fish maintain a critical ecosystem function on coral reefs by grazing algae and maintaining highly productive algal turf assemblages. Current paradigms implicate habitat complexity, predation and primary productivity as major drivers of the distribution and abundance of herbivorous fish, yet little is known about the relative contribution of these factors. Here, we compare bottom-up and top-down drivers of notional herbivore assemblages across an environmental gradient of wave exposure in the Palau archipelago. We surveyed...

Data from: Phylogeny and evolutionary history of diplobathrid crinoids (Echinodermata)

Selina R. Cole
Order Diplobathrida is a major clade of camerate crinoids spanning the Ordovician–Mississippian, yet phylogenetic relationships have only been inferred for Ordovician taxa. This has hampered efforts to construct a comprehensive tree of life for crinoids and develop a classification scheme that adequately reflects diplobathrid evolutionary history. Here, I apply maximum parsimony and Bayesian phylogenetic approaches to the fossil record of diplobathrids to infer the largest tree of fossil crinoids to date, with over 100 genera...

Data from: Personality links with lifespan in chimpanzees

Drew M Altschul, William D Hopkins, Elizabeth S Herrelko, Miho Inoue-Murayama, Tetsuro Matsuzawa, James E King, Stephen R Ross & Alexander Weiss
Life-history strategies for optimizing individual fitness fall on a spectrum between maximizing reproductive efforts and maintaining physical health over time. Strategies across this spectrum are viable and different suites of personality traits have evolved to support these strategies. Using personality and survival data from 538 captive chimpanzees (Pan troglodytes) we tested whether any of the dimensions of chimpanzee personality - agreeableness, conscientiousness, dominance, extraversion, neuroticism, and openness - were associated with longevity, an attribute of...

Data from: A new large-flowered species of Andeimalva (Malvaceae: Malvoideae) from Peru

Laurence J. Dorr, Carolina Romero-Hernandez & Kenneth J. Wurdack
Andeimalva peruviana Dorr & Romero-Hernández, sp. nov., the third Peruvian endemic in a small genus of five species, is described and illustrated from a single collection made at high elevation on the eastern slopes of the Andes. Molecular phylogenetic analyses of nuclear ribosomal ITS sequence data resolve a group of northern species of Andeimalva found in Bolivia and Peru from the morphologically very different southern A. chilensis. The new species bears the largest flowers of...

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Affiliations

  • Smithsonian Institution
    26
  • University of California, San Diego
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  • American Museum of Natural History
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  • North Carolina State University
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  • Stanford University
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  • George Washington University
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  • University of Oklahoma
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  • California Academy of Sciences
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  • University of Arizona
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  • Harvard University
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