372 Works

Data from: Gene expression plasticity evolves in response to colonization of freshwater lakes in threespine stickleback

Matthew R. J. Morris, Romain Richard, Erica H. Leder, Rowan D. H. Barrett, Nadia Aubin-Horth & Sean M. Rogers
Phenotypic plasticity is predicted to facilitate individual survival and/or evolve in response to novel environments. Plasticity that facilitates survival should both permit colonization and act as a buffer against further evolution, with contemporary and derived forms predicted to be similarly plastic for a suite of traits. On the other hand, given the importance of plasticity in maintaining internal homeostasis, derived populations that encounter greater environmental heterogeneity should evolve greater plasticity. We tested the evolutionary significance...

Data from: Very low levels of direct additive genetic variance in fitness and fitness components in a red squirrel population

S. Eryn McFarlane, Stan Boutin, Murray M. Humphries, Andrew G. McAdam, Jamieson C. Gorrell & David W. Coltman
A trait must genetically correlate with fitness in order to evolve in response to natural selection, but theory suggests that strong directional selection should erode additive genetic variance in fitness and limit future evolutionary potential. Balancing selection has been proposed as a mechanism that could maintain genetic variance if fitness components trade off with one another and has been invoked to account for empirical observations of higher levels of additive genetic variance in fitness components...

Data from: Many-to-one form-to-function mapping weakens parallel morphological evolution

Cole J. Thompson, Newaz Ahmed, Thor Veen, Catherine Lynn Peichel, Andrew P. Hendry, Daniel I. Bolnick & Yoel E. Stuart
Evolutionary ecologists aim to explain and predict evolutionary change under different selective regimes. Theory suggests that such evolutionary prediction should be more difficult for biomechanical systems in which different trait combinations generate the same functional output: “many-to-one mapping”. Many-to-one mapping of phenotype to function enables multiple morphological solutions to meet the same adaptive challenges. Therefore, many-to-one mapping should undermine parallel morphological evolution, and hence evolutionary predictability, even when selection pressures are shared among populations. Studying...

Data from: Lichens: a limit to peat growth?

Lorna I. Harris, Tim R. Moore, Nigel T. Roulet & Andrew J. Pinsonneault
1. The fruticose lichens Cladina stellaris and Cladina rangiferina, form thick mats that can cover large areas of northern peatlands (above ~ 50° latitude), including the extensive peatlands of the Hudson Bay Lowland (HBL) in Canada, where lichens may cover up to 50 % of the landscape. Despite the abundance of lichens in northern peatlands, our understanding of their role within peatland ecosystems, and peat accumulation in particular, is limited. 2. We investigate the potential...

Data from: Beyond shading: litter production by neighbours contributes to overyielding in tropical trees

Jurgis Sapijanskas, Catherine Potvin & Michel Loreau
The influence of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning is now well established. However, our ability to predict the ecological consequences of biodiversity changes remains limited by our poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying biodiversity effects. We disentangled the contributions of light competition and residual neighbourhood interactions in a ten-year-old biodiversity experiment with tropical trees that display overyielding, i.e., higher community-level yields in mixtures compared with monocultures. We developed models of individual tree growth that partition the...

Data from: Community rescue in experimental metacommunities

Etienne Low-Décarie, Marcus Kolber, Paige Homme, Andrea Lofano, Alex J. Dumbrell, Andrew Gonzalez & Graham Bell
The conditions that allow biodiversity to recover following severe environmental degradation are poorly understood. We studied community rescue, the recovery of a viable community through the evolutionary rescue of many populations within an evolving community, in metacommunities of soil microbes adapting to a herbicide. The metacommunities occupied a landscape of crossed spatial gradients of the herbicide (Dalapon) and a resource (glucose), whereas their constituent communities were either isolated or connected by dispersal. The spread of...

Data from: Linking macro-trends and micro-rates: re-evaluating micro-evolutionary support for Cope’s rule

Kiyoko M. Gotanda, Cristián Correa, Martin M. Turcotte, Gregor Rolshausen & Andrew P. Hendry
Cope's rule, wherein a lineage increases in body size through time, was originally motivated by macro-evolutionary patterns observed in the fossil record. More recently, some authors have argued that evidence exists for generally positive selection on individual body size in contemporary populations, providing a micro-evolutionary mechanism for Cope's rule. If larger body size confers individual fitness advantages as the selection estimates suggest, thereby explaining Cope's rule, then body size should increase over micro-evolutionary time scales....

Data from: Interaction between the oculomotor and postural systems during a dual-task: compensatory reductions in head sway following visually-induced postural perturbations promote the production of accurate double-step saccades in standing human adults

Mathieu Boulanger, Guillaume Giraudet & Jocelyn Faubert
Humans routinely scan their environment for useful information using saccadic eye movements and/or coordinated movements of the eyes and other body segments such the head and the torso. Most previous eye movement studies were conducted with seated subject and showed that single saccades and sequences of saccades (e.g. double-step saccades) made to briefly flashed stimuli were equally accurate and precise. As one can easily appreciate, most gaze shifts performed daily by a given person are...

Data from: Neural correlations enable invariant coding and perception of natural stimuli in weakly electric fish

Michael G. Metzen, Volker Hofmann & Maurice J. Chacron
Neural representations of behaviorally relevant stimulus features displaying invariance with respect to different contexts are essential for perception. However, the mechanisms mediating their emergence and subsequent refinement remain poorly understood in general. Here, we demonstrate that correlated neural activity allows for the emergence of an invariant representation of natural communication stimuli that is further refined across successive stages of processing in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus. Importantly, different patterns of input resulting from the...

Data from: Using playback of territorial calls to investigate mechanisms of kin discrimination in red squirrels

Julia Shonfield, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman, Stan Boutin, Murray M. Humphries, David Wilson & Andrew G. McAdam
Kin recognition can facilitate kin selection and may have played a role in the evolution of sociality. Red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus) defend territories using vocalizations known as rattles. They use rattles to discriminate kin, though the mechanism underlying this ability is unknown. Our objective was to distinguish between the mechanisms of prior association, where animals learn the phenotypes of kin they associate with early in life, and phenotype matching/recognition alleles, where animals use a template...

Data from: Coevolution of cultural intelligence, extended life history, sociality, and brain size in primates

Sally E. Street, Ana F. Navarrete, Simon M. Reader & Kevin N. Laland
Explanations for primate brain expansion and the evolution of human cognition and culture remain contentious despite extensive research. While multiple comparative analyses have investigated variation in brain size across primate species, very few have addressed why primates vary in how much they use social learning. Here, we evaluate the hypothesis that the enhanced reliance on socially transmitted behavior observed in some primates has coevolved with enlarged brains, complex sociality, and extended lifespans. Using recently developed...

Data from: Unified pre- and postsynaptic long-term plasticity enables reliable and flexible learning

Rui Ponte Costa, Robert C. Froemke, Per Jesper Sjöström & Mark C. W. Van Rossum
Although it is well known that long-term synaptic plasticity can be expressed both pre- and postsynaptically, the functional consequences of this arrangement have remained elusive. We show that spike-timing-dependent plasticity with both pre- and postsynaptic expression develops receptive fields with reduced variability and improved discriminability compared to postsynaptic plasticity alone. These long-term modifications in receptive field statistics match recent sensory perception experiments. Moreover, learning with this form of plasticity leaves a hidden postsynaptic memory trace...

Data from: Cardiac plasticity influences aerobic performance and thermal tolerance in a tropical, freshwater fish at elevated temperatures

Elizabeth A. Nyboer & Lauren J. Chapman
Fishes faced with novel thermal conditions often modify physiological functioning to compensate for elevated temperatures. This physiological plasticity (thermal acclimation) has been shown to improve metabolic performance and extend thermal limits in many species. Adjustments in cardiorespiratory function are often invoked as mechanisms underlying thermal plasticity because limitations in oxygen supply have been predicted to define thermal optima in fishes, however few studies have explicitly linked cardiorespiratory plasticity to metabolic compensation. Here we quantify thermal...

Data from: Divergence maintained by climatic selection despite recurrent gene flow: a case study of Castanopsis carlesii (Fagaceae)

Ye Sun, Yann Surget-Groba & Shaoxiong Gao
Local adaptation to different environments has the potential to maintain divergence between populations despite recurrent gene flow and is an important driver for generating biological diversity. In this study, we investigate the role of adaptation in the maintenance of two parapatric varieties of a forest tree. We used sequence variation of chloroplastic DNA and restriction site-associated DNA to investigate the genetic structure of two varieties of Castanopsis carlesii in subtropical China and relate it to...

Data from: Do stressful conditions make adaptation difficult? Guppies in the oil-polluted environments of southern Trinidad

Gregor Rolshausen, Dawn A. T. Phillip, Denise M. Beckles, Ali Akbari, Subhasis Ghoshal, Patrick B. Hamilton, Charles R. Tyler, Alan G. Scarlett, Indar Ramnarine, Paul Bentzen & Andrew P. Hendry
The ability of populations to rapidly adapt to new environments will determine their future in an increasingly human-modified world. Although meta-analyses do frequently uncover signatures of local adaptation, they also reveal many exceptions. We suggest that particular constraints on local adaptation might arise when organisms are exposed to novel stressors, such as anthropogenic pollution. To inform this possibility, we studied the extent to which guppies (Poecilia reticulata) show local adaptation to oil pollution in southern...

Data from: Melanin-based colouration and host-parasite interactions under global change

Jessica Côte, Amandine Boniface, Simon Blanchet, Andrew Hendry, Julien Gasparini & Lisa Jacquin
The role of parasites in shaping melanin-based colour polymorphism, and the consequences of colour polymorphism for disease resistance, remain debated. Here we review recent evidence of the links between melanin-based colouration and the behavioural and immunological defences of vertebrates against their parasites. First we propose that (1) differences between colour morphs can result in variable exposure to parasites, either directly (certain colours might be more or less attractive to parasites) or indirectly (variations in behaviour...

Data from: The rarity of size-assortative mating in animals: assessing the evidence with anuran amphibians

David M. Green
Assortative mating in animals can have substantial evolutionary impact. Numerous reports also make it appear to be pervasive in occurrence. In assortative mating, defined here in behavioral terms, animals select their mates according to a particular shared trait such that mated individuals resemble each other phenotypically more than expected by chance. Body size is a widely studied assortment trait. This is especially relevant for anuran amphibians (frogs and toads), among whom reproductive advantages may accrue...

Data from: CO2 alters community composition and response to nutrient enrichment of freshwater phytoplankton

Etienne Low-Décarie, Gregor F. Fussmann & Graham Bell
Nutrients can limit the productivity of ecosystems and control the composition of the communities of organisms that inhabit them. Humans are causing atmospheric CO2 concentrations to reach levels higher than those of the past millions of years while at the same time propagating eutrophication through the addition of nutrients to lakes and rivers. We studied the effect of elevated CO2 concentrations, nutrient addition and their interaction in a series of freshwater mesocosm experiments using a...

Data from: A review of riverine ecosystem service quantification: research gaps and recommendations

Dalal E. L. Hanna, Stephanie A. Tomscha, Camille Ouellet Dallaire & Elena M. Bennett
1.Increasing demand for benefits provided by riverine ecosystems threatens their sustainable provision. The ecosystem service concept is a promising avenue to inform riverine ecosystem management, but several challenges have prevented the application of this concept. 2.We quantitatively assess the field of riverine ecosystem services’ progress in meeting these challenges. We highlight conceptual and methodological gaps, which have impeded integration of the ecosystem service concept into management. 3.Across 89 relevant studies, 33 unique riverine ecosystem services...

Data from: Evolutionary rescue of sexual and asexual populations in a deteriorating environment

Josianne Lachapelle & Graham Bell
The environmental change experienced by many contemporary populations of organisms poses a serious risk to their survival. From the theory of evolutionary rescue we predict that the combination of sex and genetic diversity should increase the probability of survival by increasing variation and thereby the probability of generating a type that can tolerate the stressful environment. We tested this prediction by comparing experimental populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that differ in sexuality and in the initial...

Data from: Evolutionary inferences from the analysis of exchangeability

Andrew P. Hendry, Renaud Kaeuffer, Erika Crispo, Catherine Lynn Peichel & Daniel I. Bolnick
Evolutionary inferences are usually based on statistical models that compare mean genotypes and phenotypes (or their frequencies) among populations. An alternative is to use the actual distribution of genotypes and phenotypes to infer the “exchangeability” of individuals among populations. We illustrate this approach by using discriminant functions on principal components to classify individuals among paired lake and stream populations of threespine stickleback in each of six independent watersheds. Classification based on neutral and non-neutral microsatellite...

Data from: INTREPAD: a randomized trial of naproxen to slow progress of presymptomatic Alzheimer disease

Pierre-Francois Meyer, Jennifer Tremblay-Mercier, Jeannie Leoutsakos, Cecile Madjar, Marie-Elyse Lafaille-Magnan, Melissa Savard, Pedro Rosa-Neto, Judes Poirier, Pierre Etienne & John Breitner
Objective: Evaluate the safety and efficacy of low-dose naproxen for prevention of progression in pre-symptomatic AD among cognitively intact persons at-risk. Methods: INTREPAD, a two-year double-masked pharmaco-prevention trial, enrolled 195 AD family history-positive elderly (mean age 63 years) screened carefully to exclude cognitive disorder. These were randomized 1:1 to naproxen sodium 220mg twice-daily or placebo. Multimodal imaging, neurosensory, cognitive and (in ~50%) CSF biomarker evaluations were performed at Baseline, 3, 12, and 24 months. A...

Data from: Quantifying climate sensitivity and climate-driven change in North American amphibian communities

David A. W. Miller, Evan H. Campbell Grant, Erin Muths, Staci M. Amburgey, Michael J. Adams, Maxwell B. Joseph, J. Hardin Waddle, Pieter T. J. Johnson, Maureen E. Ryan, Benedikt R. Schmidt, Daniel L. Calhoun, Courtney L. Davis, Robert N. Fisher, David M. Green, Blake R. Hossack, Tracy A. G. Rittenhouse, Susan C. Walls, Larissa L. Bailey, Sam S. Cruickshank, Gary M. Fellers, Thomas A. Gorman, Carola A. Haas, Ward Hughson, David S. Pilliod, Steven J. Price … & Brent H. Sigafus
Changing climate will impact species’ ranges only when environmental variability directly impacts the demography of local populations. However, measurement of demographic responses to climate change has largely been limited to single species and locations. Here we show that amphibian communities are responsive to climatic variability, using >500,000 time-series observations for 81 species across 86 North American study areas. The effect of climate on local colonization and persistence probabilities varies among eco-regions and depends on local...

Data from: Projected polar bear sea ice habitat in the Canadian Arctic Archipelago

Stephen G. Hamilton, Laura Castro De La Guardia, Andrew E. Derocher, Vicki Sahanatien, Bruno Tremblay & David Huard
Background: Sea ice across the Arctic is declining and altering physical characteristics of marine ecosystems. Polar bears (Ursus maritimus) have been identified as vulnerable to changes in sea ice conditions. We use sea ice projections for the Canadian Arctic Archipelago from 2006 – 2100 to gain insight into the conservation challenges for polar bears with respect to habitat loss using metrics developed from polar bear energetics modeling. Principal Findings: Shifts away from multiyear ice to...

Data from: Vegetation response to control of invasive Tamarix in southwestern US rivers: a collaborative study including 416 sites

Eduardo González, Anna A. Sher, Robert M. Anderson, Robin F. Bay, Daniel W. Bean, Gabriel J. Bissonnete, Bérenger Bourgeois, David J. Cooper, Kara Dohrenwend, Kim D. Eichhorst, Hisham El Waer, Deborah K. Kennard, Rebecca Harms-Weissinger, Annie L. Henry, Lori J. Makarick, Steven M. Ostoja, Lindsay V. Reynolds, W. Wright Robinson & Patrick B. Shafroth
Most studies assessing vegetation response following control of invasive Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers have been small in scale (e.g., river reach), or at a regional scale but with poor spatial-temporal replication, and most have not included testing the effects of a now widely-used biological control. We monitored plant composition following Tamarix control along hydrologic, soil and climatic gradients in 244 treated and 172 reference sites across six U.S. States. This represents the largest...

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