11 Works

Data from: Sharp genetic discontinuity across a unimodal Heliconius hybrid zone

Carlos F. Arias, Claudia Rosales, Camilo Salazar, Jully Castano, Eldredge Bermingham, Mauricio Linares & W. Owen McMillan
Hybrid zones are powerful natural systems to study evolutionary processes to gain an understanding of adaptation and speciation. In the Cauca Valley (Colombia), two butterfly races, Heliconius cydno cydnides and Heliconius cydno weymeri, meet and hybridize. We characterized this hybrid zone using a combination of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences, Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLPs), microsatellites, and sequences for nuclear loci within and outside of the genomic regions that cause differences in wing color pattern. The...

Data from: Life history change in response to fishing and an introduced predator in the East African cyprinid Rastrineobola argentea

Diana M. T. Sharpe, Silvester B. Wandera & Lauren J. Chapman
Fishing and introduced species are among the most important stressors affecting freshwaters, and can be important selective agents. We examined the combined effects of commercial fishing and an introduced predator (Nile perch, Lates niloticus) on life history traits in an African cyprinid fish (Rastrineobola argentea) native to the Lake Victoria basin in East Africa. To understand whether these two stressors have driven shifts in life history traits of R. argentea, we tested for associations between...

Data from: Low heritabilities, but genetic and maternal correlations between red squirrel behaviours.

Ryan W. Taylor, Adrienne K. Boon, Ben Dantzer, Denis Réale, Murray M. Humphries, Stan Boutin, Jamieson C. Gorrell, David W. Coltman & Andrew G. McAdam
Consistent individual differences in behaviour, and behavioural correlations within and across contexts, are referred to as animal personalities. These patterns of variation have been identified in many animal taxa and are likely to have important ecological and evolutionary consequences. Despite their importance, genetic and environmental sources of variation in personalities have rarely been characterized in wild populations. We used a Bayesian animal model approach to estimate genetic parameters for aggression, activity and docility in North...

Data from: Beyond shading: litter production by neighbours contributes to overyielding in tropical trees

Jurgis Sapijanskas, Catherine Potvin & Michel Loreau
The influence of biodiversity on ecosystem functioning is now well established. However, our ability to predict the ecological consequences of biodiversity changes remains limited by our poor understanding of the mechanisms underlying biodiversity effects. We disentangled the contributions of light competition and residual neighbourhood interactions in a ten-year-old biodiversity experiment with tropical trees that display overyielding, i.e., higher community-level yields in mixtures compared with monocultures. We developed models of individual tree growth that partition the...

Data from: Evolutionary rescue of sexual and asexual populations in a deteriorating environment

Josianne Lachapelle & Graham Bell
The environmental change experienced by many contemporary populations of organisms poses a serious risk to their survival. From the theory of evolutionary rescue we predict that the combination of sex and genetic diversity should increase the probability of survival by increasing variation and thereby the probability of generating a type that can tolerate the stressful environment. We tested this prediction by comparing experimental populations of Chlamydomonas reinhardtii that differ in sexuality and in the initial...

Data from: Phylogenetic conservatism in plant phenology

T. Jonathan Davies, Elizabeth M. Wolkovich, Nathan J. B. Kraft, Nicolas Salamin, Jenica M. Allen, Toby R. Ault, Julio L. Betancourt, Kjell Bolmgren, Elsa E. Cleland, Benjamin I. Cook, Theresa M. Crimmins, Susan J. Mazer, Gregory J. McCabe, Stephanie Pau, Jim Regetz, Mark D. Schwartz & Steven E. Travers
Phenological events – defined points in the life cycle of a plant or animal – have been regarded as highly plastic traits, reflecting flexible responses to various environmental cues. The ability of a species to track, via shifts in phenological events, the abiotic environment through time might dictate its vulnerability to future climate change. Understanding the predictors and drivers of phenological change is therefore critical. Here, we evaluated evidence for phylogenetic conservatism – the tendency...

Data from: Disentangling invasion processes in a dynamic shipping - boating network

Anaïs Lacoursière-Roussel, Christopher W. McKindsey, Dan G. Bock, Melania E. Cristescu, Frédéric Guichard, Philippe Girard & Pierre Legendre
The relative importance of multiple vectors to the initial establishment, spread, and population dynamics of invasive species remains poorly understood. This study used molecular methods to clarify the roles of commercial shipping and recreational boating in the invasion by the cosmopolitan tunicate, Botryllus schlosseri. We evaluated i) single vs. multiple introduction scenarios, ii) the relative importance of shipping and boating to primary introductions, iii) the interaction between these vectors for spread (i.e., the presence of...

Data from: Ontogenetic and stratigraphic influence on observed phenotypic integration in the limb skeleton of a fossil tetrapod

Erin E. Maxwell & T. Alexander Dececchi
Understanding morphological integration is one of the central goals of evolutionary developmental biology. Despite its applicability to questions of paleontological interest, there are few studies on integration in fossil vertebrates. In this study, we examine limb integration in the Lower Jurassic ichthyosaur Stenopterygius quadriscissus, with the aim of examining the effect of ontogeny and anagenetic changes over short geological time spans on metrics of limb integration. Both ontogenetic and stratigraphic effects had a significant influence...

Data from: Episodic radiations in the fly tree of life

Brian M. Wiegmann, Michelle D. Trautwein, Isaac S. Winkler, Norman B. Barr, Jung-Wook Kim, Christine Lambkin, Matthew A. Bertone, Brian K. Cassel, Keith M. Bayless, Alysha M. Heimberg, Benjamin M. Wheeler, Kevin J. Peterson, Thomas Pape, Bradley J. Sinclair, Jeffrey H. Skevington, Vladimir Blagoderov, Jason Caravas, Sujatha Narayanan Kutty, Urs Schmidt-Ott, Gail E. Kampmeier, F. Christian Thompson, David A. Grimaldi, Andrew T. Beckenbach, Gregory W. Courtney, Markus Friedrich … & J.-W. Kim
Flies are one of four superradiations of insects (along with beetles, wasps, and moths) that account for the majority of animal life on Earth. Diptera includes species known for their ubiquity (Musca domestica house fly), their role as pests (Anopheles gambiae malaria mosquito), and their value as model organisms across the biological sciences (Drosophila melanogaster). A resolved phylogeny for flies provides a framework for genomic, developmental, and evolutionary studies by facilitating comparisons across model organisms,...

Data from: Oxidative damage increases with reproductive energy expenditure and is reduced by food-supplementation

Quinn E. Fletcher, Colin Selman, Stan Boutin, Andrew G. McAdam, Sarah B. Woods, Arnold Y. Seo, Christiaan Leeuwenburgh, John R. Speakman & Murray M. Humphries
A central principle in life-history theory is that reproductive effort negatively affects survival. Costs of reproduction are thought to be physiologically-based, but the underlying mechanisms remain poorly understood. Using female North American red squirrels (Tamiasciurus hudsonicus), we test the hypothesis that energetic investment in reproduction overwhelms investment in antioxidant protection, leading to oxidative damage. In support of this hypothesis we found that the highest levels of plasma protein oxidative damage in squirrels occurred during the...

Data from: Ecological correlates of the distribution limits of two poeciliid species across a salinity gradient

Julián Torres-Dowdall, Felipe Dargent, Corey A. Handelsman, Indar W. Ramnarine & Cameron K. Ghalambor
Identifying the environmental factors responsible for the formation of a species' distribution limit is challenging because organisms interact in complex ways with their environments. However, the use of statistical niche models in combination with the analysis of phenotypic variation along environmental gradients can help to reduce such complexity and identify a subset of candidate factors. In the present study, we used such approaches to describe and identify factors responsible for the parapatric distribution of two...

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