27 Works

Data from: Habitat filtering not dispersal limitation shapes oceanic island floras: species assembly of the Galápagos archipelago

Sofía Carvajal-Endara, Andrew P. Hendry, Nancy C. Emery & T. Jonathan Davies
Remote locations, such as oceanic islands, typically harbour relatively few species, some of which go on to generate endemic radiations. Species colonising these locations tend to be a non-random subset from source communities, which is thought to reflect dispersal limitation. However, non-random colonisation could also result from habitat filtering, whereby only a few continental species can become established. We evaluate the imprints of these processes on the Galápagos flora by analysing a comprehensive regional phylogeny...

Data from: Upon accounting for the impact of isoenzyme loss, gene deletion costs anticorrelate with their evolutionary rates

Christopher Jacobs, Luke Lambourne, Yu Xia & Daniel Segre
System-level metabolic network models enable the computation of growth and metabolic phenotypes from an organism’s genome. In particular, flux balance approaches have been used to estimate the contribution of individual metabolic genes to organismal fitness, offering the opportunity to test whether such contributions carry information about the evolutionary pressure on the corresponding genes. Previous failure to identify the expected negative correlation between such computed gene-loss cost and sequence-derived evolutionary rates in Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been...

Data from: Distance-dependent pattern blending can camouflage salient aposematic signals

James B. Barnett, Innes C. Cuthill & Nicholas E. Scott-Samuel
The effect of viewing distance on the perception of visual texture is well known: spatial frequencies higher than the resolution limit of an observer's visual system will be summed and perceived as a single combined colour. In animal defensive colour patterns, distance-dependent pattern blending may allow aposematic patterns, salient at close range, to match the background to distant observers. Indeed, recent research has indicated that reducing the distance from which a salient signal can be...

Data from: Modelling the spread of innovation in wild birds

Thomas R. Shultz, Marcel Montrey & Lucy M. Aplin
We apply three plausible algorithms in agent-based computer simulations to recent experiments on social learning in wild birds. Although some of the phenomena are simulated by all three learning algorithms, several manifestations of social conformity bias are simulated by only the approximate majority (AM) algorithm, which has roots in chemistry, molecular biology and theoretical computer science. The simulations generate testable predictions and provide several explanatory insights into the diffusion of innovation through a population. The...

Data from: Elevated temperature and acclimation time affect metabolic performance in the heavily exploited Nile perch of Lake Victoria

Elizabeth A. Nyboer & Lauren J. Chapman
Increasing water temperatures due to anthropogenic climate change are predicted to negatively impact the aerobic metabolic performance of aquatic ectotherms. Specifically, it has been hypothesized that thermal increases result in reductions in aerobic scope (AS), which lead to decreases in energy available for essential fitness and performance functions. Consequences of warming are anticipated to be especially severe for warm-adapted tropical species as they are thought to have narrow thermal windows and limited plasticity for coping...

Data from: Multi-scale quantification of tissue behavior during amniote embryo axis elongation

Bertrand Benazeraf, Mathias Beaupeux, Martin Tcherknookov, Allison Wallingford, Tasha Salisbury, Amelia Shirtz, Andrew Shirtz, David Huss, Olivier Pourquie, Paul Francois & Rusty Lansford
Embryonic axis elongation is a complex multi-tissue morphogenetic process responsible for the formation of the posterior part of the amniote body. How movements and growth are coordinated between the different posterior tissues (e.g. neural tube, axial and paraxial mesoderm, lateral plate, ectoderm, endoderm) to drive axis morphogenesis remain largely unknown. Here, we use quail embryos to quantify cell behavior and tissue movements during elongation. We quantify the tissue-specific contribution to axis elongation by using 3D...

Data from: The ecological importance of intraspecific variation

Simone Des Roches, David M. Post, Nash E. Turley, Joseph K. Bailey, Andrew P. Hendry, Michael T. Kinnison, Jennifer A. Schweitzer & Eric P. Palkovacs
Human activity is causing wild populations to experience rapid trait change and local extirpation. The resulting effects on intraspecific variation could have substantial consequences for ecological processes and ecosystem services. Although researchers have long acknowledged that variation among species influences the surrounding environment, only recently has evidence accumulated for the ecological importance of variation within species. We conducted a meta-analysis comparing the ecological effects of variation within a species (intraspecific effects) with the effects of...

Data from: Subgenome dominance in an interspecific hybrid, synthetic allopolyploid, and a 140-year-old naturally established neo-allopolyploid monkeyflower

Patrick P. Edger, Ronald D. Smith, Michael R. McKain, Arielle M. Cooley, Mario Vallejo-Marin, Yao-Wu Yuan, Adam J. Bewick, Lexiang Ji, Adrian E. Platts, Megan J. Bowman, Kevin Childs, Jacob D. Washburn, Robert Schmitz, Gregory D. Smith, J. Chris Pires & Joshua R. Puzey
Recent studies have shown that one of the parental subgenomes in ancient polyploids is generally more dominant - having both retained more genes and being more highly expressed - a phenomenon termed subgenome dominance. The genomic features that determine how quickly and which subgenome dominates within a newly formed polyploid remain poorly understood. To investigate the rate of subgenome dominance emergence, we examined gene expression, gene methylation, and transposable element (TE) methylation in a natural,...

Data from: Courtship song preferences in female zebra finches are shaped by developmental auditory experience

Yining Chen, Oliver Clark & Sarah C. Woolley
The performance of courtship signals provides information about the behavioural state and quality of the signaller, and females can use such information for social decision-making (e.g. mate choice). However, relatively little is known about the degree to which the perception of and preference for differences in motor performance are shaped by developmental experiences. Furthermore, the neural substrates that development could act upon to influence the processing of performance features remains largely unknown. In songbirds, females...

Data from: Simultaneous evolution of multiple dispersal components and kernel

Sudipta Tung, Abhishek Mishra, P. M. Shreenidhi, Mohammed Aamir Sadiq, Sripad Joshi, V. R. Shree Sruti, Sutirth Dey & Mohammed Aamir Sadiq
Global climate is changing rapidly and is accompanied by large-scale fragmentation and destruction of habitats. Since dispersal is the first line of defense for mobile organisms to cope with such adversities in their environment, it is important to understand the causes and consequences of evolution of dispersal. Although dispersal is a complex phenomenon involving multiple dispersal-components like propensity (tendency to leave the natal patch) and ability (to travel long distances), the relationship between these traits...

Data from: Evolution of mammalian migrations for refuge, breeding, and food

Gitanjali E. Gnanadesikan, William D. Pearse & Allison K. Shaw
Many organisms migrate between distinct habitats, exploiting variable resources while profoundly affecting ecosystem services, disease spread, and human welfare. However, the very characteristics that make migration captivating and significant also make it difficult to study, and we lack a comprehensive understanding of which species migrate and why. Here we show that, among mammals, migration is concentrated within Cetacea and Artiodactyla but also diffusely spread throughout the class (found in 12 of 27 orders). We synthesize...

Data from: Exploring the effects of salinization on trophic diversity in freshwater ecosystems: a quantitative review

Luis Fernando De León, Cameron K. Ghalambor, Diana M. T. Sharpe & Anakena M. Castillo
Salinization of freshwater ecosystems represents a potential threat to biodiversity, but the distribution of salinity tolerance among freshwater organisms and its functional consequences are understudied. In this study, we reviewed global patterns of salinity tolerance across a broad range of freshwater organisms. Specifically, we compared published data on LC50 (a metric of salinity tolerance) across climatic regions, taxa, and functional feeding groups (FFGs). We found that microinvertebrates were more sensitive to salinity than vertebrates and...

Data from: Using simulations to evaluate Mantel-based methods for assessing landscape resistance to gene flow

Katherine A. Zeller, Tyler G. Creech, Katie L. Millette, Rachel S. Crowhurst, Robert A. Long, Helene H. Wagner, Niko Balkenhol & Erin L. Landguth
Mantel-based tests have been the primary analytical methods for understanding how landscape features influence observed spatial genetic structure. Simulation studies examining Mantel-based approaches have highlighted major challenges associated with the use of such tests and fueled debate on when the Mantel test is appropriate for landscape genetics studies. We aim to provide some clarity in this debate using spatially explicit, individual-based, genetic simulations to examine the effects of the following on the performance of Mantel-based...

Data from: Ants as ecological indicators of rainforest restoration: community convergence and the development of an Ant Forest Indicator Index in the Australian wet tropics

Michael J. Lawes, Anthony M. Moore, Alan N. Andersen, Noel D. Preece & Donald C. Franklin
Ecosystem restoration can help reverse biodiversity loss, but whether faunal communities of forests undergoing restoration converge with those of primary forest over time remains contentious. There is a need to develop faunal indicators of restoration success that more comprehensively reflect changes in biodiversity and ecosystem function. Ants are an ecologically dominant faunal group and are widely advocated as ecological indicators. We examine ant species and functional group responses on a chronosequence of rainforest restoration in...

Data from: Predicting the spread of all invasive forest pests in the United States

Emma J. Hudgins, Andrew M. Liebhold & Brian Leung
We tested whether a general spread model could capture macroecological patterns across all damaging invasive forest pests in the United States. We showed that a common constant dispersal kernel model, simulated from the discovery date, explained 67.94% of the variation in range size across all pests, and had 68.00% locational accuracy between predicted and observed locational distributions. Further, by making dispersal a function of forest area and human population density, variation explained increased to 75.60%,...

Data from: Defector clustering is linked to cooperation in a pathogenic bacterium

Edward W. Tekwa, Dao Nguyen, Michel Loreau & Andrew Gonzalez
Spatial clustering is thought to favour the evolution of cooperation because it puts cooperators in a position to help each other. However, clustering also increases competition. The fate of cooperation may depend on how much cooperators cluster relative to defectors, but these clustering differences have not been the focus of previous models and experiments. By competing siderophore-producing cooperator and defector strains of the opportunistic pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa in experimental microhabitats, we found that at the...

Data from: Predicting peatland carbon fluxes from non-destructive plant traits

Ellie M. Goud, Tim R. Moore & Nigel T. Roulet
1. Determining the plant traits that best predict carbon (C) storage is increasingly important as global change drivers will affect plant species composition and ecosystem C cycling. Despite the critical role of peatlands in the global C cycle, trait-flux relationships in peatlands are relatively unknown. 2. We assessed the ability of four non-destructive plant traits to predict carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) fluxes over two growing seasons in a temperate peatland in Ontario, Canada....

Data from: Vegetation response to control of invasive Tamarix in southwestern US rivers: a collaborative study including 416 sites

Eduardo González, Anna A. Sher, Robert M. Anderson, Robin F. Bay, Daniel W. Bean, Gabriel J. Bissonnete, Bérenger Bourgeois, David J. Cooper, Kara Dohrenwend, Kim D. Eichhorst, Hisham El Waer, Deborah K. Kennard, Rebecca Harms-Weissinger, Annie L. Henry, Lori J. Makarick, Steven M. Ostoja, Lindsay V. Reynolds, W. Wright Robinson & Patrick B. Shafroth
Most studies assessing vegetation response following control of invasive Tamarix trees along southwestern U.S. rivers have been small in scale (e.g., river reach), or at a regional scale but with poor spatial-temporal replication, and most have not included testing the effects of a now widely-used biological control. We monitored plant composition following Tamarix control along hydrologic, soil and climatic gradients in 244 treated and 172 reference sites across six U.S. States. This represents the largest...

Data from: Interaction between the oculomotor and postural systems during a dual-task: compensatory reductions in head sway following visually-induced postural perturbations promote the production of accurate double-step saccades in standing human adults

Mathieu Boulanger, Guillaume Giraudet & Jocelyn Faubert
Humans routinely scan their environment for useful information using saccadic eye movements and/or coordinated movements of the eyes and other body segments such the head and the torso. Most previous eye movement studies were conducted with seated subject and showed that single saccades and sequences of saccades (e.g. double-step saccades) made to briefly flashed stimuli were equally accurate and precise. As one can easily appreciate, most gaze shifts performed daily by a given person are...

Data from: Many-to-one form-to-function mapping weakens parallel morphological evolution

Cole J. Thompson, Newaz Ahmed, Thor Veen, Catherine Lynn Peichel, Andrew P. Hendry, Daniel I. Bolnick & Yoel E. Stuart
Evolutionary ecologists aim to explain and predict evolutionary change under different selective regimes. Theory suggests that such evolutionary prediction should be more difficult for biomechanical systems in which different trait combinations generate the same functional output: “many-to-one mapping”. Many-to-one mapping of phenotype to function enables multiple morphological solutions to meet the same adaptive challenges. Therefore, many-to-one mapping should undermine parallel morphological evolution, and hence evolutionary predictability, even when selection pressures are shared among populations. Studying...

Data from: A review of riverine ecosystem service quantification: research gaps and recommendations

Dalal E. L. Hanna, Stephanie A. Tomscha, Camille Ouellet Dallaire & Elena M. Bennett
1.Increasing demand for benefits provided by riverine ecosystems threatens their sustainable provision. The ecosystem service concept is a promising avenue to inform riverine ecosystem management, but several challenges have prevented the application of this concept. 2.We quantitatively assess the field of riverine ecosystem services’ progress in meeting these challenges. We highlight conceptual and methodological gaps, which have impeded integration of the ecosystem service concept into management. 3.Across 89 relevant studies, 33 unique riverine ecosystem services...

Data from: Carrion fly-derived DNA metabarcoding is an effective tool for mammal surveys: evidence from a known tropical mammal community

Torrey W. Rodgers, Charles C. Y. Xu, Jacalyn Giacalone, Karen M. Kapheim, Kristin Saltonstall, Marta Vargas, Douglas W. Yu, Panu Somervuo, W. Owen McMillan & Patrick A. Jansen
Metabarcoding of vertebrate DNA derived from carrion flies has been proposed as a promising tool for biodiversity monitoring. To evaluate its efficacy, we conducted metabarcoding surveys of carrion flies on Barro Colorado Island (BCI), Panama, which has a well-known mammal community, and compared our results against diurnal transect counts and camera-trapping. We collected 1084 flies in 29 sampling days, conducted metabarcoding with mammal-specific (16S) and vertebrate-specific (12S) primers, and sequenced amplicons on Illumina MiSeq. For...

Data from: Stimulus background influences phase invariant coding by correlated neural activity

Michael G. Metzen & Maurice J. Chacron
We recently reported that correlations between the activities of peripheral afferents mediate a phase invariant representation of natural communication stimuli that is refined across successive processing stages thereby leading to perception and behavior in the weakly electric fish Apteronotus leptorhynchus (Metzen et al., 2016). Here, we explore how phase invariant coding and perception of natural communication stimuli are affected by changes in the sinusoidal background over which they occur. We found that increasing background frequency...

Data from: The effect of selection history on extinction risk during severe environmental change

Josianne Lachapelle, Nick Colegrave & Graham Bell
Environments rarely remain the same over time, and populations are therefore frequently at risk of going extinct when changes are significant enough to reduce fitness. While many studies have investigated what attributes of the new environments and of the populations experiencing these changes will affect their probability of going extinct, limited work has been directed toward determining the role of population history on the probability of going extinct during severe environmental change. Here we compare...

Data from: Multilevel and sex-specific selection on competitive traits in North American red squirrels.

David N. Fisher, Stan Boutin, Ben Dantzer, Murray M. Humphries, Jeffrey E. Lane & Andrew G. McAdam
Individuals often interact more closely with some members of the population (e.g. offspring, siblings or group members) than they do with other individuals. This structuring of interactions can lead to multilevel natural selection, where traits expressed at the group-level influence fitness alongside individual-level traits. Such multilevel selection can alter evolutionary trajectories, yet is rarely quantified in the wild, especially for species that do not interact in clearly demarcated groups. We quantified multilevel natural selection on...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    27

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    27

Affiliations

  • McGill University
    27
  • Utah State University
    2
  • Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute
    2
  • University of Toronto
    2
  • Colorado State University
    2
  • Donald Danforth Plant Science Center
    1
  • Children's Hospital of Los Angeles
    1
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    1
  • University of Montana
    1
  • The University of Texas at Austin
    1