47 Works

Data from: Land use intensity indirectly affects ecosystem services mainly through plant functional identity in a temperate forest

Verónica Chillo, Diego P. Vázquez, Mariano M. Amoroso & Elena M. Bennett
1.Land-use change is known to affect biodiversity, and there is increasing concern regarding how these changes may impact the provision of ecosystem services. Although functional composition (diversity and identity) could influence ecosystem properties and services at the community level, there is little quantitative understanding of these relationships in the field. Here, we evaluate the direct and indirect effects (through ecosystem properties) of biodiversity on the provision of multiple ecosystem services in native mixed forest in...

Data from: Small- to large-scale patterns of ground-dwelling spider (Araneae) diversity across northern Canada

Sarah Loboda & Christopher M. Buddle
We examined how Arctic spider (Araneae) biodiversity is distributed at multiple spatial scales in Northern Canada using a standardized hierarchical sampling design. We investigated which drivers, environmental or spatial, influence the patterns observed. Spatial patterns of species richness and composition of Arctic spiders were assessed in 12 sites located in Arctic, Subarctic, and North-Boreal regions, across 30 degrees of latitude and 80 degrees of longitude. Variation of diversity was partitioned in relation to multiple environmental...

Data from: Revisiting protein aggregation as pathogenic in sporadic Parkinson’s and Alzheimer’s diseases

Alberto J. Espay, Joaquin A. Vizcarra, Luca Marsili, Anthony E. Lang, David K. Simon, Aristide Merola, Keith A. Josephs, Alfonso Fasano, Francesca Morgante, Rodolfo Savica, J. Timothy Greenamyre, Franca Cambi, Tritia R. Yamasaki, Caroline M. Tanner, Ziv Gan-Or, Irene Litvan, Ignacio F. Mata, Cyrus P. Zabetian, Patrik Brundin, Hubert H. Fernandez, David G. Standaert, Marcelo A. Kauffman, Michael A. Schwarzschild, S. Pablo Sardi, Todd Sherer … & James B. Leverenz
The gold standard for a definitive diagnosis of Parkinson’s disease (PD) is the pathologic finding of aggregated alpha-synuclein into Lewy bodies and for Alzheimer’s disease (AD) aggregated amyloid into plaques and hyperphosphorylated tau into tangles. Implicit in this clinico-pathologic-based nosology is the assumption that pathological protein aggregation at autopsy reflect pathogenesis at disease onset. While these aggregates may in exceptional cases be on a causal pathway in humans (e.g., aggregated alpha-synuclein in SNCA gene multiplication...

Data from: Adaptation in temporally variable environments: stickleback armor in periodically breaching bar-built estuaries

Antoine Paccard, Ben A. Wasserman, Dieta Hanson, Louis Astorg, Dan Durston, Sara Kurland, Travis M. Apgar, Rana W. El-Sabaawi, Eric P. Palkovacs, Andrew P. Hendry, Rowan D.H. Barrett & Rowan D. H. Barrett
The evolutionary consequences of temporal variation in selection remain hotly debated. We explored these consequences by studying threespine stickleback in a set of bar-built estuaries along the central California coast. In most years, heavy rains induce water flow strong enough to break through isolating sand bars, connecting streams to the ocean. New sand bars typically re-form within a few weeks or months, thereby re-isolating populations within the estuaries. These breaching events cause severe and often...

Data from: A comparison of techniques for classifying behaviour from accelerometers for two species of seabird

Allison Patterson, H. G. Gilchrist, Lorraine Chivers, Scott Hatch & Kyle Elliott
The behavior of many wild animals remains a mystery, as it is difficult to quantify behaviour of species that cannot be easily followed throughout their daily or seasonal movements. Accelerometers can solve some of these mysteries, as they collect activity data at a high temporal resolution (< 1 sec), can be relatively small (< 1 g) so they minimally disrupt behavior, and are increasingly capable of recording data for long periods. Nonetheless, there is a...

Data from: DNA metabarcoding reveals changes in the contents of carnivorous plants along an elevation gradient

Joanne E. Littlefair, Axel Zander, Clara De Sena Costa & Elizabeth L. Clare
Resource variation along abiotic gradients influences subsequent trophic interactions and these effects can be transmitted through entire food webs. Interactions along abiotic gradients can provide clues as to how organisms will face changing environmental conditions, such as future range shifts. However, it is challenging to find replicated systems to study these effects. Phytotelmata, such as those found in carnivorous plants, are isolated aquatic communities and thus form a good model for the study of replicated...

Data from: Metabarcoding using multiplexed markers increases species detection in complex zooplankton communities

Guang K. Zhang, Frédéric J.J. Chain, Cathryn L. Abbott & Melania E. Cristescu
Metabarcoding combines DNA barcoding with high-throughput sequencing, often using one genetic marker to understand complex and taxonomically diverse samples. However, species-level identification depends heavily on the choice of marker and the selected primer pair, often with a trade-off between successful species amplification and taxonomic resolution. We present a versatile metabarcoding protocol for biomonitoring that involves the use of two barcode markers (COI and 18S) and four primer pairs in a single high-throughput sequencing run, via...

Data from: Flexible decision-making in grooming partner choice in sooty mangabeys and chimpanzees

Alexander Mielke, Anna Preis, Liran Samuni, Jan F. Gogarten, Roman M. Wittig & Catherine Crockford
Living in permanent social groups forces animals to make decisions about when, how and with whom to interact, requiring decisions to be made that integrate multiple sources of information. Changing social environments can influence this decision-making process by constraining choice or altering the likelihood of a positive outcome. Here, we conceptualised grooming as a choice situation where an individual chooses one of a number of potential partners. Studying two wild populations of sympatric primate species,...

Data from: The mechanics of predator-prey interactions: first principles of physics predict predator-prey size ratios

Sebastien Portalier, Gregor Fussmann, Michel Loreau & Mehdi Cherif
1. Robust predictions of predator-prey interactions are fundamental for the understanding of food webs, their structure, dynamics, resistance to species loss, response to invasions and ecosystem function. Most current food web models measure parameters at the food web level to predict patterns at the same level. Thus, they are sensitive to the quality of the data, and may be ineffective in predicting non-observed interactions and disturbed food webs. There is a need for mechanistic models...

Data from: Sexual dimorphism modifies habitat‐associated divergence: evidence from beach and creek breeding sockeye salmon

Krista B. Oke, Elena Motivans, Thomas P. Quinn & Andrew P. Hendry
Studies of parallel or convergent evolution (the repeated, independent evolution of similar traits in similar habitats) rarely explicitly quantify the extent of parallelism (i.e., variation in the direction and/or magnitude of divergence) between the sexes; instead they often investigate both sexes together or exclude one sex. However, differences in male and female patterns of divergence could contribute to overall variation in the extent of parallelism among ecotype pairs, especially in sexually dimorphic traits. Failing to...

Data from: Ability to modulate birdsong across social contexts develops without imitative social learning

Logan S. James, Jennifer B. Dai & Jon T. Sakata
Many important behaviours are socially learned. For example, the acoustic structure of courtship songs in songbirds is learned by listening to and interacting with conspecifics during a sensitive period in development. Signalers modify the spectral and temporal structures of their vocalizations depending on the social context, but the degree to which this modulation requires imitative social learning remains unknown. We found that zebra finches that were not exposed to context-dependent song modulations throughout development significantly...

Data from: Female preference for novel males constrains contemporary evolution of assortative mating in guppies

Felipe Dargent, Lisa Chen, Gregor F. Fussmann, Cameron K. Ghalambor & Andrew P. Hendry
Progress toward local adaptation is expected to be enhanced when divergent selection is multi-dimensional, because many simultaneous sources of selection can increase the total strength of selection and enhance the number of independent traits under selection. Yet, whether local adaptation ensues from multi-dimensional selection also depends on its potential to cause the build-up of reproductive barriers such as sexual signals and preference for these signals. We used replicate experimental introductions of guppies (Poecilia reticulata) in...

Data from: The unrealized potential of herbaria in global change biology

Emily K. Meineke, Charles C. Davis & T. Jonathan Davies
Plant and fungal specimens in herbaria are becoming primary resources for investigating how plant phenology and geographic distributions shift with climate change, greatly expanding inferences across spatial, temporal, and phylogenetic dimensions. However, these specimens contain a wealth of additional data—including nutrients, defensive compounds, herbivore damage, disease lesions, and signatures of physiological processes—that capture ecological and evolutionary responses to the Anthropocene but which are less frequently utilized. Here, we outline the diversity of herbarium data, global...

Data from: Impacts of deforestation-induced warming on the metabolism, growth, and trophic interactions of an afrotropical stream fish

Vincent Fugère, Thomas Mehner & Lauren J. Chapman
1. In ectotherms, anthropogenic warming often increases energy requirements for metabolism, which can either impair growth (when resources are limiting) or lead to higher predator feeding rates and possibly stronger top-down trophic interactions. However, the relative importance of these effects in nature remains unclear because: 1) thermal adaptation or acclimation could lower metabolic costs; 2) greater prey production at warmer temperatures could compensate for higher predator feeding rates; and/or 3) temperature effects on trophic interactions...

Data from: Exploring an alternative explanation for the second phase of viral decay: infection of short-lived cells in a drug-limited compartment during HAART

Steven Sanche, Thibault Mesplède, Nancy Sheehan, Jun Li, Fahima Nekka & Nancy L. Sheehan
Most HIV-infected patients who initiate combination antiretroviral therapy experience a viral load decline in several phases. These phases are characterized by different rates of viral load decay that decrease when transitioning from one phase to the next. There is no consensus as to the origin of these phases. One hypothesis put forward is that short- and long-lived infected cells are responsible for the first and second phases of decay, respectively. However, significant differences in drug...

Data from: Assessment of plasma proteomics biomarker’s ability to distinguish benign from malignant lung nodules

Gerard A. Silvestri, Nichole T. Tanner, Paul Kearney, Anil Vachani, Pierre P. Massion, Alexander Porter, Steven C. Springmeyer, Kenneth C. Fang, David Midthun, Peter J. Mazzone, D. Madtes, J. Landis, A. Levesque, K. Rothe, M. Balaan, B. Dimitt, B. Fortin, N. Ettinger, A. Pierre, L. Yarmus, K. Oakjones-Burgess, N. Desai, Z. Hammoud, A. Sorenson, R. Murali … & F. Allison
Background: Lung nodules are a diagnostic challenge, with an estimated yearly incidence of 1.6 million in the United States. This study evaluated the accuracy of an integrated proteomic classifier in identifying benign nodules in patients with a pretest probability of cancer (pCA) ≤ 50%. Methods: A prospective, multicenter observational trial of 685 patients with 8- to 30-mm lung nodules was conducted. Multiple reaction monitoring mass spectrometry was used to measure the relative abundance of two...

Data from: Spatial modeling improves understanding patterns of invasive species defoliation by a biocontrol herbivore

Annie L. Henry, Eduardo González, W. Wright Robinson, Bérenger Bourgeois & Anna A. Sher
Spatial modeling has proven to be useful in understanding the drivers of plant populations in the field of ecology, but has yet to be applied to understanding variation in biocontrol impact. In this study, we employ multi-scale analysis (Moran’s Eigenvector Maps) to better understand the variation in tree canopy exposed to defoliation by a biocontrol beetle (Diorhabda spp.). The control of the exotic tree Tamarix in riparian areas has long been a priority for land...

Data from: Integration and modularity of teleostean pectoral fin shape and its role in the diversification of acanthomorph fishes

Trina Y. Du, Sylvie C. Tissandier & Hans C. E. Larsson
Phenotypic integration and modularity describe the strength and pattern of interdependencies between traits. Integration and modularity have been proposed to influence the trajectory of evolution, either acting as constraints or facilitators. Here, we examine trends in the integration and modularity of pectoral fin morphology in teleost fishes using geometric morphometrics. We compare the fin shapes of the highly diverse radiation of acanthomorph fishes to lower teleosts. Integration and modularity are measured using two-block partial least...

Data from: Wild and laboratory exposure to cues of predation risk increases relative brain mass in male guppies

Adam R. Reddon, Laura Chouinard-Thuly, Ioannis Leris & Simon M. Reader
There is considerable diversity in brain size within and among species, and substantial dispute over the causes, consequences and importance of this variation. Comparative and developmental studies are essential in addressing this controversy. Predation pressure has been proposed as a major force shaping brain, behaviour and life history. The Trinidadian guppy, Poecilia reticulata, shows dramatic variation in predation pressure across populations. We compared the brain mass of guppies from high and low predation populations collected...

Data from: Dissolved organic carbon in streams within a subarctic catchment analysed using a GIS/remote sensing approach

Pearl Mzobe, Martin Berggren, Petter Pilesjö, Erik Lundin, David Olefeldt, Nigel T. Roulet & Andreas Persson
Climate change projections show that temperature and precipitation increases can alter the exchange of greenhouse gases between the atmosphere and high latitude landscapes, including their freshwaters. Dissolved organic carbon (DOC) plays an important role in greenhouse gas emissions, but the impact of catchment productivity on DOC release to subarctic waters remains poorly known, especially at regional scales. We test the hypothesis that increased terrestrial productivity, as indicated by the normalized difference vegetation index (NDVI), generates...

Data from: Intrinsically regulated learning is modulated by synaptic dopamine signaling

Pablo Ripollés, Laura Ferreri, Ernest Mas-Herrero, Helena Alicart, Alba Gómez-Andrés, Josep Marco-Pallares, Rosa Maria Antonijoan, Toemme Noesselt, Marta Valle, Jordi Riba & Antoni Rodriguez-Fornells
We recently provided evidence that an intrinsic reward-related signal-triggered by successful learning in absence of any external feedback-modulated the entrance of new information into long-term memory via the activation of the dopaminergic midbrain, hippocampus, and ventral striatum (the SN/VTA-Hippocampal loop; Ripollés et al., 2016). Here, we used a double-blind, within-subject randomized pharmacological intervention to test whether this learning process is indeed dopamine-dependent. A group of healthy individuals completed three behavioral sessions of a language-learning task...

Data from: Local adaptation primes cold-edge populations for range expansion but not warming-induced range shifts

Anna L. Hargreaves, Chris G. Eckert & Christopher G. Eckert
According to theory, edge populations may be poised to expand species’ ranges if they are locally adapted to extreme conditions, or ill-suited to colonize beyond-range habitat if their offspring are genetically and competitively inferior. We tested these contrasting predictions by transplanting low, mid, and high-elevation (edge) populations of an annual plant throughout and above its elevational distribution. Seed from poor-quality edge habitat had inferior emergence, but edge seeds were also locally adapted. High-elevation plants flowered...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    47

Resource Types

  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • McGill University
    47
  • Harvard University
    4
  • University of Washington
    3
  • University of Alberta
    3
  • Concordia University
    3
  • University of Saskatchewan
    2
  • New York University
    2
  • University of Alaska Fairbanks
    2
  • University of Guelph
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2