3 Works

Data from: Blind to morphology: genetics identifies several widespread ecologically common species and few endemics among Indo-Pacific cauliflower corals (Pocillopora, Scleractinia)

Jorge H. Pinzón, Eugenia Sampayo, Evelyn Cox, Leonard J. Chauka, Chaolun Allen Chen, Christian R. Voolstra & Todd C. LaJeunesse
AIM: Using high-resolution genetic markers on samples gathered from across their wide distributional range, we endeavoured to delimit species diversity in reef-building Pocillopora corals. They are common, ecologically important, and widespread throughout the Indo-Pacific, but their phenotypic plasticity in response to environmental conditions and their nearly featureless microskeletal structures confound taxonomic assignments and limit an understanding of their ecology and evolution. LOCATION: Indo-Pacific, Red Sea, Arabian/Persian Gulf. METHODS: Sequence analysis of nuclear ribosomal (internal transcribed...

Data from: Environmental gradients predict the genetic population structure of a coral reef fish in the Red Sea

Gerrit B. Nanninga, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Manica Andrea, Michael L. Berumen & Andrea Manica
The relatively recent fields of terrestrial landscape and marine seascape genetics seek to identify the influence of biophysical habitat features on the spatial genetic structure of populations or individuals. Over the last few years, there has been accumulating evidence for the effect of environmental heterogeneity on patterns of gene flow and connectivity in marine systems. Here we investigate the population genetic patterns of an anemonefish, Amphiprion bicinctus, along the Saudi Arabian coast of the Red...

Data from: Two decades of genetic profiling yields first evidence of natal philopatry and long-term fidelity to parturition sites in sharks

Kevin A. Feldheim, Samuel H. Gruber, Joseph D. DiBattista, Elizabeth A. Babcock, Steven A. Kessel, Andrew P. Hendry, Ellen K. Pikitch, Mary V. Ashley & Demian D. Chapman
Sharks are a globally threatened group of marine fishes that often breed in their natal region of origin. There has even been speculation that female sharks return to their exact birthplace to breed (“natal philopatry”), which would have important conservation implications. Genetic profiling of lemon sharks (Negaprion brevirostris) from 20 consecutive cohorts (1993-2012) at Bimini, Bahamas showed that certain females faithfully gave birth at this site for nearly two decades. At least six females born...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    3
  • Field Museum of Natural History
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • McGill University
    1
  • University of Hawaii at Manoa
    1
  • University of Illinois at Chicago
    1
  • Bimini Biological Field Station Foundation
    1
  • Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution
    1
  • University of Dar es Salaam
    1
  • Pennsylvania State University
    1