10 Works

Data from: Environmental switching during biofilm development in a cold seep system and functional determinants of species sorting

Weipeng Zhang, Renmao Tian, Yang Bo, Huiluo Cao, Lin Cai, Lianguo Chen, Guowei Zhou, Jin Sun, Xixiang Zhang, Abdulaziz Al-Suwailem & Pei-Yuan Qian
The functional basis for species sorting theory remains elusive, especially for microbial community assembly in deep-sea environments. Using artificial surface-based biofilm models, our recent work revealed taxonomic succession during biofilm development in a newly defined cold seep system, the Thuwal cold seeps II, which comprises a brine pool and the adjacent normal bottom water (NBW) to form a metacommunity via the potential immigration of organisms from one patch to another. Here, we designed an experiment...

Data from: Ecomorphological convergence in planktivorous surgeonfishes

Sarah T. Friedman, Samantha A. Price, Andrew S. Hoey & Peter C. Wainwright
Morphological convergence plays a central role in the study of evolution. Often induced by shared ecological specialization, homoplasy hints at underlying selective pressures and adaptive constraints that deterministically shape the diversification of life. Though midwater zooplanktivory has arisen in adult surgeonfishes (family Acanthuridae) at least four independent times, it represents a clearly specialized state, requiring the capacity to swiftly swim in midwater locating and sucking small prey items. While this diet has commonly been associated...

Data from: Benchmarking DNA metabarcoding for biodiversity-based monitoring and assessment

Eva Aylagas, Angel Borja, Xabier Irigoien & Naiara Rodriguez-Ezpeleta
Characterization of biodiversity has been extensively used to confidently monitor and assess environmental status. Yet, visual morphology, traditionally and widely used for species identification in coastal and marine ecosystem communities, is tedious and entails limitations. Metabarcoding coupled with high-throughput sequencing represents an alternative to rapidly, accurately and cost-effectively analyze thousands of environmental samples simultaneously, and this method is increasingly used to characterize the metazoan taxonomic composition of a wide variety of environments. However, a comprehensive...

Data from: Introgression and selection shaped the evolutionary history of sympatric sister-species of coral reef fishes (genus: Haemulon)

Moises A. Bernal, Michelle R. Gaither, Warren Brian Simison & Luiz A. Rocha
Closely related marine species with large sympatric ranges provide opportunities to study the mechanisms of speciation, particularly when there is evidence of gene flow between the lineages. Here we focus on a case of hybridization between the sympatric sister-species Haemulon maculicauda and H. flaviguttatum, using Sanger sequencing of mitochondrial and nuclear loci, as well as 2422 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) obtained via Restriction-site Associated DNA Sequencing (RADSeq). Mitochondrial markers revealed a shared haplotype for COI...

Data from: Global ecological success of Thalassoma fishes in extreme coral reef habitats

Christopher J. Fulton, Peter C. Wainwright, Andrew S. Hoey & David R. Bellwood
Phenotypic adaptations can allow organisms to relax abiotic selection and facilitate their ecological success in challenging habitats, yet we have relatively little data for the prevalence of this phenomenon at macroecological scales. Using data on the relative abundance of coral reef wrasses and parrotfishes (f. Labridae) spread across three ocean basins and the Red Sea, we reveal the consistent global dominance of extreme wave-swept habitats by fishes in the genus Thalassoma, with abundances up to...

Data from: Salinity tolerance loci revealed in rice using high-throughput non-invasive phenotyping

Nadia Al-Tamimi, Chris Brien, Helena Oakey, Bettina Berger, Stephanie Saade, Yung Shwen Ho, Sandra M. Schmöckel, Mark Tester & Sónia Negrão
High-throughput phenotyping produces multiple measurements over time, which require new methods of analyses that are flexible in their quantification of plant growth and transpiration, yet are computationally economic. Here we develop such analyses and apply this to a rice population genotyped with a 700k SNP high-density array. Two rice diversity panels, indica and aus, containing a total of 553 genotypes, are phenotyped in waterlogged conditions. Using cubic smoothing splines to estimate plant growth and transpiration,...

Data from: Year-long monitoring of physico-chemical and biological variables provide a comparative baseline of coral reef functioning in the central Red Sea

Anna Roik, Till Röthig, Cornelia Roder, Maren Zielger, Stephan G. Kremb, Christian R. Voolstra & Maren Ziegler
Coral reefs in the central Red Sea are sparsely studied and in situ data on physico-chemical and key biotic variables are missing to provide an important comparative baseline. To fill this gap, we monitored three reefs along a cross-shelf gradient during a full year, simultaneously collecting data on currents, temperature, salinity, dissolved oxygen (DO), chlorophyll-a, turbidity, inorganic nutrients, sedimentation, bacterial communities of reef water, and bacterial and algal composition of epilithic biofilms. Some of these...

Data from: Large-scale, multi-directional larval connectivity among coral reef fish populations in the Great Barrier Reef Marine Park

David H. Williamson, Hugo B. Harrison, Glenn R. Almany, Michael L. Berumen, Michael Bode, Mary C. Bonin, Severine Choukroun, Peter J. Doherty, Ashley J. Frisch, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo & Geoffrey P. Jones
Larval dispersal is the key process by which populations of most marine fishes and invertebrates are connected and replenished. Advances in larval tagging and genetics have enhanced our capacity to track larval dispersal, assess scales of population connectivity, and quantify larval exchange among no-take marine reserves and fished areas. Recent studies have found that reserves can be a significant source of recruits for populations up to 40 km away, but the scale and direction of...

Data from: Restricted grouper reproductive migrations support community-based management

Peter A. Waldie, Glenn R. Almany, Tane H. Sinclair-Taylor, Richard J. Hamilton, Tapas Potuku, Mark A. Priest, Kevin L. Rhodes, Jan Robinson, Joshua E. Cinner & Michael L. Berumen
Conservation commonly requires trade-offs between social and ecological goals. For tropical small-scale fisheries, spatial scales of socially appropriate management are generally small—the median no-take locally managed marine area (LMMA) area throughout the Pacific is less than 1 km2. This is of particular concern for large coral reef fishes, such as many species of grouper, which migrate to aggregations to spawn. Current data suggest that the catchment areas (i.e. total area from which individuals are drawn)...

Data from: Seascape and life-history traits do not predict self-recruitment in a coral reef fish

Marcela Herrera, Gerrit B. Nanninga, Serge Planes, Geoffrey P. Jones, Simon R. Thorrold, Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Glenn R. Almany & Michael L. Berumen
The persistence and resilience of many coral reef species are dependent on rates of connectivity among sub-populations. However, despite increasing research efforts, the spatial scale of larval dispersal remains unpredictable for most marine metapopulations. Here, we assess patterns of larval dispersal in the angelfish Centropyge bicolor in Kimbe Bay, Papua New Guinea, using parentage and sibling reconstruction analyses based on 23 microsatellite DNA loci. We found that, contrary to previous findings in this system, self-recruitment...

Registration Year

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Affiliations

  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
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  • James Cook University
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  • University of Queensland
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  • Australian National University
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