8 Works

Data from: Optimal soil carbon sampling designs to achieve cost-effectiveness: a case study in blue carbon ecosystems

Mary A. Young, Peter I. Macreadie, Clare Duncan, Paul E. Carnell, Emily Nicholson, Oscar Serrano, Carlos M. Duarte, Glenn Shiell, Jeff Baldock & Daniel Ierodiaconou
Researchers are increasingly studying carbon (C) storage by natural ecosystems for climate mitigation, including coastal ‘blue carbon’ ecosystems. Unfortunately, little guidance on how to achieve robust, cost-effective estimates of blue C stocks to inform inventories exists. We use existing data (492 cores) to develop recommendations on the sampling effort required to achieve robust estimates of blue C. Using a broad-scale, spatially explicit dataset from Victoria, Australia, we applied multiple spatial methods to provide guidelines for...

Data from: The effects of aging on neuropil structure in mouse somatosensory cortex—A 3D electron microscopy analysis of layer 1

Corrado Cali, Marta Wawrzyniak, Carlos Becker, Bohumil Maco, Marco Cantoni, Anne Jorstad, Biagio Nigro, Federico Grillo, Vincenzo De Paola, Pascal Fua & Graham William Knott
This study has used dense reconstructions from serial EM images to compare the neuropil ultrastructure and connectivity of aged and adult mice. The analysis used models of axons, dendrites, and their synaptic connections, reconstructed from volumes of neuropil imaged in layer 1 of the somatosensory cortex. This shows the changes to neuropil structure that accompany a general loss of synapses in a well-defined brain region. The loss of excitatory synapses was balanced by an increase...

Data from: Give the machine a hand: a Boolean time-based decision-tree template for rapidly finding animal behaviours in multi-sensor data

Rory P. Wilson, Mark D. Holton, Agustina Di Virgilio, Hannah Williams, Emily L. C. Shepard, Sergio Lambertucci, Flavio Quintana, Juan E Sala, Bharathan Balaji, Eun Sun Lee, Mani Srivastava, D. Michael Scantlebury & Carlos M. Duarte
1. The development of multi-sensor animal-attached tags, recording data at high frequencies, has enormous potential in allowing us to define animal behaviour. 2. The high volumes of data, are pushing us towards machine-learning as a powerful option for distilling out behaviours. However, with increasing parallel lines of data, systems become more likely to become processor limited and thereby take appreciable amounts of time to resolve behaviours. 3. We suggest a Boolean approach whereby critical changes...

Data from: Systematic revision of Symbiodiniaceae highlights the antiquity and diversity of coral endosymbionts

Todd C. LaJeunesse, John Everett Parkinson, Paul W. Gabrielson, Hae Jin Jeong, James Davis Reimer, Christian R. Voolstra & Scott R. Santos
The advent of molecular data has transformed the science of organizing and studying life on Earth. Genetics-based evidence provides fundamental insights into the diversity, ecology, and origins of many biological systems, including the mutualisms between metazoan hosts and their micro-algal partners. A well-known example is the dinoflagellate endosymbionts (“zooxanthellae”) that power the growth of stony corals and coral reef ecosystems. Once assumed to encompass a single panmictic species, genetic evidence has revealed a divergent and...

Data from: Coral reef carbonate budgets and ecological drivers in the central Red Sea – a naturally high temperature and high total alkalinity environment

Anna Roik, Till Röthig, Claudia Pogoreutz, Vincent Saderne, Christian R. Voolstra & Till Roethig
The structural framework provided by corals is crucial for reef ecosystem function and services, but high seawater temperatures can be detrimental to the calcification capacity of reef-building organisms. The Red Sea is very warm, but total alkalinity (TA) is naturally high and beneficial for reef accretion. To date, we know little about how such detrimental and beneficial abiotic factors affect each other and the balance between calcification and erosion on Red Sea coral reefs, i.e.,...

Data from: Weak population structure of the Spot-tail shark Carcharhinus sorrah and the Blacktip shark C. limbatus along the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula, Pakistan and South Africa

Dareen Almojil, Geremy Cliff, Julia L.Y. Spaet & Julia L. Y. Spaet
The increase in demand for shark meat and fins has placed shark populations worldwide under high fishing pressure. In the Arabian region, the Spot-tail shark Carcharhinus sorrah and the Blacktip shark Carcharhinus limbatus are among the most exploited species. In this study we investigated the population genetic structure of C. sorrah (n= 327) along the coasts of the Arabian Peninsula and of C. limbatus (n= 525) along the Arabian coasts, Pakistan and KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa...

GLAM: Glycogen-derived Lactate Absorption Map for visual analysis of dense and sparse surface reconstructions of rodent brain structures on desktop systems and virtual environments

Marco Agus, Daniya Boges, Nicolas Gagnon, Pierre J. Magistretti, Markus Hadwiger & Corrado Cali
Human brain accounts for about one hundred billion neurons, but they cannot work properly without ultrastructural and metabolic support. For this reason, mammalian brains host another type of cells called “glial cells”, whose role is to maintain proper conditions for efficient neuronal function. One type of glial cell, astrocytes, are involved in particular in the metabolic support of neurons, by feeding them with lactate, one byproduct of glucose metabolism that they can take up from...

Data from: Timing of host feeding drives rhythms in parasite replication

Kimberley F. Prior, Daan R. Van Der Veen, Aidan J. O'Donnell, Katherine Cumnock, David Schneider, Arnab Pain, Amit Subudhi, Abhinay Ramaprasad, Samuel S. C. Rund, Nicholas J. Savill, Sarah E. Reece & Aidan J. O’Donnell
Circadian rhythms enable organisms to synchronise the processes underpinning survival and reproduction to anticipate daily changes in the external environment. Recent work shows that daily (circadian) rhythms also enable parasites to maximise fitness in the context of ecological interactions with their hosts. Because parasite rhythms matter for their fitness, understanding how they are regulated could lead to innovative ways to reduce the severity and spread of diseases. Here, we examine how host circadian rhythms influence...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    8

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    8

Affiliations

  • King Abdullah University of Science and Technology
    8
  • Stanford University
    1
  • Queen's University Belfast
    1
  • University of Surrey
    1
  • MRC Clinical Sciences Centre
    1
  • Oregon State University
    1
  • University of North Carolina
    1
  • University of Cambridge
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • King's College - North Carolina
    1