2 Works

Data from: Seasonal polyphenism in wing coloration affects species recognition in rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina spp.)

Jonathan P. Drury, Christopher N. Anderson & Gregory F. Grether
Understanding how phenotypic plasticity evolves and in turn affects the course of evolution is a major challenge in modern biology. By definition, biological species are reproductively isolated, but many animals fail to distinguish between conspecifics and closely related heterospecifics. In some cases, phenotypic plasticity may interfere with species recognition. Here, we document a seasonal polyphenism in the degree of dark wing pigmentation in smoky rubyspot damselflies (Hetaerina titia) – a shift so pronounced that it...

Data from: Reproductive interference explains persistence of aggression between species

Jonathan P. Drury, Kenichi W. Okamoto, Christopher N. Anderson & Gregory F. Grether
Interspecific territoriality occurs when individuals of different species fight over space, and may arise spontaneously when populations of closely related territorial species first come into contact. But defence of space is costly, and unless the benefits of excluding heterospecifics exceed the costs, natural selection should favour divergence in competitor recognition until the species no longer interact aggressively. Ordinarily males of different species do not compete for mates, but when males cannot distinguish females of sympatric...

Registration Year

  • 2015
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • Dominican University
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  • University of California Los Angeles
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  • North Carolina State University
    1