3 Works

Raw allelic matrix and supplementary materials: Origin and dispersion pathways of guava in the Galapagos Islands inferred through genetics and historical records

Diego Urquia, Bernardo Gutierrez, Gabriela Pozo, Maria Jose Pozo & Maria De Lourdes Torres
Guava (Psidium guajava) is an aggressive invasive plant in the Galapagos Islands. Determining its provenance and genetic diversity could explain its adaptability and spread, and how this relates to past human activities. With this purpose, we analyzed 11 SSR markers in guava individuals from Isabela, Santa Cruz, San Cristobal and Floreana islands in the Galapagos, as well as from mainland Ecuador. The mainland guava population appeared genetically differentiated from the Galapagos populations, with higher genetic...

Phylogenomic discordance in the Eared Seals is best explained by incomplete lineage sorting following explosive radiation in the Southern Hemisphere

Fernando Lopes, Larissa Oliveira, Amanda Kessler, Yago Beux, Enrique Crespo, Susana Cárdenas-Alayza, Patricia Majluf, Maritza Sepulveda, , Valentina Franco-Trecu, Diego Paez-Rosas, Jaime Chaves, Carolina Loch, Bruce Robertson, Karina Acevedo-Whitehouse, Fernando Elorriaga-Verplancken, Stephen Kirkman, Claire Peart, Jochen Wolf & Sandro Bonatto
The phylogeny and systematics of fur seals and sea lions (Otariidae) have long been studied with diverse data types, including an increasing amount of molecular data. However, only a few phylogenetic relationships have reached acceptance pointing at strong gene-tree species tree discordance. Divergence times in the group also vary largely between studies. These uncertainties impeded the understanding of the biogeographical history of the group, such as when and how trans-equatorial dispersal and subsequent speciation events...

Urbanization alters interactions between Darwin’s finches and Tribulus cistoides on the Galápagos Islands

Ruth Rivkin, Reagan Johnson, Jaime Chaves & Marc Johnson
Emerging evidence suggests that humans shape the ecology and evolution of species interactions. Islands are particularly susceptible to anthropogenic disturbance due to the fragility of their ecosystems; however, we know little about the susceptibility of species interactions to urbanization on islands. To address this gap, we studied how the earliest stages of urban development affect interactions between Darwin’s finches and its key food resource, Tribulus cistoides, in three towns on the Galápagos Islands. We measured...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Universidad San Francisco de Quito
    3
  • University of Valparaíso
    1
  • Autonomous University of Queretaro
    1
  • University of Otago
    1
  • Department of Environmental Affairs
    1
  • Pontifical Catholic University of Rio Grande do Sul
    1
  • National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration
    1
  • University of the Republic
    1
  • University of Toronto
    1
  • Cayetano Heredia University
    1