66 Works

Timing uncertainty in collective risk dilemmas encourages group reciprocation and polarization

Elias Fernandez Domingos, Jelena Grujić, Francisco C. Santos, Juan C. Burguillo Rial, Georg Kirchsteiger, Francisco C. Santos & Tom Lenaerts
Social dilemmas are often shaped by actions involving uncertain returns only achievable in the future, such as climate action or voluntary vaccination. In this context, uncertainty may produce non-trivial effects. Here, we assess experimentally — through a collective risk dilemma — the effect of timing uncertainty, i.e. how uncertainty about when a target needs to be reached affects the participants’ behaviours. We show that timing uncertainty prompts not only early generosity but also polarised outcomes,...

Data from: Asexual queen succession in the higher termite Embiratermes neotenicus

Romain Fougeyrollas, Klára Dolejšová, David Sillam-Dussès, Virginie Roy, Chantal Poteaux, Robert Hanus & Yves Roisin
Asexual queen succession (AQS), in which workers, soldiers and dispersing reproductives are produced sexually while numerous non-dispersing queens arise through thelytokous parthenogenesis, has recently been described in three species of lower termites of the genus Reticulitermes. Here, we show that AQS is not an oddity restricted to a single genus of lower termites, but a more widespread strategy occurring also in the most advanced termite group, the higher termites (Termitidae). We analysed the genetic structure...

Data from: Evolution of self-organized task specialization in robot swarms

Eliseo Ferrante, Ali Emre Turgut, Edgar Duéñez Guzmán, Marco Dorigo, Tom Wenseleers & Edgar Duéñez-Guzmán
Division of labor is ubiquitous in biological systems, as evidenced by various forms of complex task specialization observed in both animal societies and multicellular organisms. Although clearly adaptive, the way in which division of labor first evolved remains enigmatic, as it requires the simultaneous co-occurrence of several complex traits to achieve the required degree of coordination. Recently, evolutionary swarm robotics has emerged as an excellent test bed to study the evolution of coordinated group-level behavior....

Data from: Parental separation and behaviours that influence the health of infants aged 7 to 11 months: a cross-sectional study

Nadine Kacenelenbogen
Objective: Analyse the parental behaviours that are recognized as influencing the health of very young children based on family structure (parents separated or not). Design: Cross-sectional study, examining 79,701 infants aged 7 to 11 months as part of a free preventive medicine consultation. The data came from an assessment conducted 7 to 11 months after birth during which information was collected, namely about the parents' use of tobacco, the infant's type of nutrition, and adherence...

Data from: Group choices seemingly at odds with individual preferences

Michel-Olivier Laurent Salazar, Stamatios C. Nicolis, Mariano Calvo Martín, Grégory Sempo, Jean-Louis Deneubourg & Isaac Planas-Sitjà
Numerous studies have focused on the influence of the social environment and the interactions between individuals on the collective decision-making of groups. They showed, for example, that attraction between individuals is at the origin of an amplification of individual preferences. These preferences may concern various environmental cues such as biomolecules that convey information about the environment such as vanillin, which, for some insects, is an attractant. In this study, we analysed how the social context...

Data from: Distinct mesoderm migration phenotypes in extra-embryonic and embryonic regions of the early mouse embryo

Bechara Saykali, Navrita Mathiah, Wallis Nahaboo, Marie-Lucie Racu, Latifa Hammou, Matthieu Defrance & Isabelle Migeotte
In the gastrulation mouse embryo, epiblast cells delaminate at the primitive streak to form mesoderm and definitive endoderm, through an epithelial-mesenchymal transition. Mosaic expression of a membrane reporter in nascent mesoderm enabled recording cell shape and trajectory through live imaging. Upon leaving the streak, cells changed shape and extended protrusions of distinct size and abundance depending on the neighboring germ layer, as well as the region of the embryo. Embryonic trajectories were meandrous but directional,...

Data from: Sex-biased dispersal creates spatial genetic structure in a parthenogenetic ant with a dependent-lineage reproductive system

Alexandre Kuhn, David Bauman, Hugo Darras & Serge Aron
Reproduction and dispersal are key aspects of species life history that influence spatial genetic structure in populations. Several ant species in the genus Cataglyphis have evolved a unique breeding system in which new reproductives (that is, queens and males) are produced asexually by parthenogenesis; in contrast, non-reproductives (that is, workers) are produced via sexual reproduction by mates from distinct genetic lineages. We investigated how these two coexisting reproductive methods affect population-level spatial genetic structure using...

Data from: Congruent phylogeographic patterns of eight tree species in Atlantic Central Africa provide insights on the past dynamics of forest cover

Gilles Dauby, Jérôme Duminil, Myriam Heuertz, K. Guillaume Koffi, Tariq Stévart & Olivier J. Hardy
Cycles of Quaternary climate change are assumed to be major drivers of African rainforest dynamics and evolution. However, most hypotheses on past vegetation dynamics relied on palaeobotanical records, an approach lacking spatial resolution, and on current patterns of species diversity and endemism, an approach confounding history and environmental determinism. In this context, a comparative phylogeographic study of rainforest species represents a complementary approach because Pleistocene climate fluctuations may have left interpretable signatures in the patterns...

Data from: Resource use and food preferences in understorey ant communities along a complete elevational gradient in Papua New Guinea

Jerome Orivel, Petr Klimes, Vojtech Novotny & Maurice Leponce
Elevational gradients provide an interesting opportunity for studying the effect of climatic drivers over short distances on the various facets of biodiversity. It is globally assumed that the decrease in species richness with increasing elevation follows mainly the decrease in ecosystem productivity, but studies on functional diversity still remain limited. Here, we investigated how resource use and food preferences by both individual ant species and communities foraging in the understorey vary with elevation along a...

Data from: Colonization of weakened trees by mass-attacking bark beetles: no penalty for pioneers, scattered initial distributions and final regular patterns

Etienne Toffin, Edith Gabriel, Marceau Louis, Jean-Louis Deneubourg & Jean-Claude Grégoire
Bark beetles use aggregation pheromones to promote group foraging, thus increasing the chances of an individual to find a host and, when relevant, to overwhelm the defences of healthy trees. When a male beetle finds a suitable host, it releases pheromones that attract potential mates as well as other "spying" males, which results in aggregations on the new host. To date, most studies have been concerned with the use of aggregation pheromones by bark beetles...

Data from: Effects of dispersal‐ and niche‐based factors on tree recruitment in tropical wet forest restoration

Leland K. Werden, Karen D. Holl, Juan Abel Rosales, Janelle M. Sylvester & Rakan A. Zahawi
Both dispersal‐ and niche‐based factors can impose major barriers on tree establishment. Our understanding of how these factors interact to determine recruitment rates is based primarily on findings from mature tropical forests, despite the fact that a majority of tropical forests are now secondary. Consequently, factors influencing seed limitation and the seed‐to‐seedling transition (STS) in disturbed landscapes, and how those factors shift during succession, are not well understood. We used a 3.5‐yr record of seed...

Data from: Comparative multi-locus phylogeography of two Palaearctic spruce bark beetles: influence of contrasting ecological strategies on genetic variation

François Mayer, Frédéric B. Piel, Anna Cassel-Lundhagen, Natalia Kirichenko, Laurent Grumiau, Bjørn Økland, Coralie Bertheau, Jean-Claude Grégoire & Patrick Mardulyn
While phylogeographic patterns of organisms are often interpreted through past environmental disturbances, mediated by climate changes, and geographic barriers, they may also be strongly influenced by species-specific traits. To investigate the impact of such traits, we focused on two Eurasian spruce bark beetles that share a similar geographic distribution, but differ in their ecology and reproduction. Ips typographus is an aggressive tree-killing species characterized by strong dispersal, whereas Dendroctonus micans is a discrete inbreeding species...

Data from: Demographic history of the trace metal hyperaccumulator Noccaea caerulescens (J. Presl and C. Presl) F. K. Mey. in Western Europe

Cedric Gonneau, Nausicaa Noret, Cécile Godé, Hélène Frérot, Catherine Sirguey, Thibault Sterckeman & Maxime Pauwels
Noccaea caerulescens (Brassicaceae) is a major pseudometallophyte model for the investigation of the genetics and evolution of metal hyperaccumulation in plants. We studied the population genetics and demographic history of this species to advance the understanding of among-population differences in metal hyperaccumulation and tolerance abilities. Sampling of seven to 30 plants was carried out in 62 sites in Western Europe. Genotyping was carried out using a combination of new chloroplast and nuclear neutral markers. A...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: Regulatory mechanisms of group distributions in a gregarious arthropod

Pierre Broly, Romain Mullier, Cédric Devigne & Jean-Louis Deneubourg
In a patchy environment, how social animals manage conspecific and environmental cues in their choice of habitat is a leading issue for understanding their spatial distribution and their exploitation of resources. Here, we experimentally tested the effects of environmental heterogeneities (artificial shelters) and some of their characteristics (size and fragmentation) on the aggregation process of a common species of terrestrial isopod (Crustacea). One hundred individuals were introduced into three different heterogeneous set-ups and in a...

Data from: Cryptic lineages hybridize for worker production in the harvester ant Messor barbarus

Victoria Norman, Hugo Darras, Christopher Tranter, Serge Aron & William O. H. Hughes
The reproductive division of labour between queen and worker castes in social insects is a defining characteristic of eusociality and a classic example of phenotypic plasticity. Whether social insect larvae develop into queens or workers has long been thought to be determined by environmental cues, i.e. larvae are developmentally totipotent. Contrary to this paradigm, several recent studies have revealed that caste is determined by genotype in some ant species, but whether this is restricted to...

Data from: Flying the nest: male dispersal and multiple paternity enables extrafamilial matings for the invasive bark beetle Dendroctonus micans

Ceridwen I. Fraser, Olivier Brahy, Patrick Mardulyn, Loïc Dohet, François Mayer & Jean-Claude Grégoire
There is an evolutionary trade-off between the resources that a species invests in dispersal versus those invested in reproduction. For many insects, reproductive success in patchily-distributed species can be improved by sibling-mating. In many cases, such strategies correspond to sexual dimorphism, with males–whose reproductive activities can take place without dispersal–investing less energy in development of dispersive resources such as large body size and wings. This dimorphism is particularly likely when males have little or no...

Data from: Chronic exposure to low-dose radiation at Chernobyl favours adaptation to oxidative stress in birds

Ismael Galván, Andrea Bonisoli-Alquati, Shanna Jenkinson, Ghanem Ghanem, Kazumasa Wakamatsu, Timothy A. Mousseau & Anders P. Møller
1. Ionizing radiation produces oxidative stress, but organisms can adapt to their exposure with physiological adaptive responses. However, the role of radioadaptive responses in wild populations remains poorly known. 2. At Chernobyl, studies of birds and other taxa including humans show that chronic exposure to radiation depletes antioxidants and increases oxidative damage. Here we present analyses of levels of the most important intracellular antioxidant (i.e., glutathione, GSH), its redox status, DNA damage and body condition...

Data from: Asexual queen succession mediates an accelerated colony life cycle in the termite Silvestritermes minutus

Romain Fougeyrollas, Jan Křivánek, Virginie Roy, Klára Dolejšová, Sophie Frechault, Yves Roisin, Robert Hanus & David Sillam-Dussès
Mixed modes of reproduction, combining sexual processes with thelytokous parthenogenesis, occur in all major clades of social insects. In several species of termites, queens maximize their genetic input into nondispersing replacement queens through parthenogenesis, while maintaining genetically diverse sterile offspring and dispersing reproductives via sexual reproduction. This so-called asexual queen succession (AQS) has multiple independent origins and its presumed advantages are diverse as well, ranging from multiplication of colony reproductive potential to extension of its...

Plastid introgression and evolution of African miombo woodlands: new insights from the plastome-based phylogeny of Brachystegia trees

Arthur Boom, Jérémy Migliore, Esra Kaymak, Pierre Meerts & Olivier Hardy
Aim: Miombo woodlands form a characteristic vegetation type covering 2.7 million km2 in southern and eastern Africa. Despite their wide geographical extent, their origin, floristic and spatial evolution through time remain understudied. To fill this gap, we studied the evolution of Brachystegia trees, one of the most representative genera of these woodlands (20 species), also represented in Guineo-Congolian rain forests (8 species). Location: Tropical Africa, Guineo-Congolian forests and Zambezian savannahs. Methods: We used a genome...

Data from: Maintenance of genetic and morphological identity in two sibling Syrrhopodon species (Calymperaceae, Bryopsida) despite extensive introgression

Marta R. Pereira, Alice Ledent, Patrick Mardulyn, Charles E. Zartman & Alain Vanderpoorten
Bryophytes are a group of land plants wherein the role of hybridization has long been challenged. Using Genotyping by Sequencing to circumvent the lack of molecular variation at selected loci previously used for phylogeny and morphology, we determine the level of genetic and morphological divergence and reproductive isolation between the sibling Syrrhopodon annotinus and S. simmondsii (Calymperaceae, Bryopsida) that occur in sympatry but in different habitats in lowland Amazonian rainforests. A clear morphological differentiation and...

Highlighting convergent evolution in morphological traits in response to climatic gradient in African tropical tree species: the case of genus Guibourtia Benn

Felicien Tosso, Jean-Louis Doucet, Kasso Daïnou, Adeline Fayolle, Alain Hambuckers, Charles Doumenge, Honoré Agbazahou, Piet Stoffelen & Olivier Hardy
Adaptive evolution is a major driver of organism diversification but the links between phenotypic traits and environmental niche remains little documented in tropical trees. Moreover, trait-niche relationships are complex because a correlation between the traits and environmental niches displayed by a sample of species may result from (1) convergent evolution if different environmental conditions have selected different sets of traits, and/or (2) phylogenetic inertia if niche and morphological differences between species are simply function of...

Data from: Determinants and dynamics of banded vegetation pattern migration in arid climates

Vincent Deblauwe, Pierre Couteron, Jan Bogaert & Nicolas Barbier
Dense vegetation bands aligned parallel to contour levels and alternating at regular intervals with relatively barren interbands have been reported at the margins of all tropical deserts. Since their discovery in the 1950s, it has been suspected that these vegetation bands migrate upslope, forming a space-time cyclic pattern. Evidence to date has been relatively sparse and indirect, and observations have remained conflicting. Unequivocal photographic evidence of upslope migration (a few dm yr-1) is provided here...

Data from: Speciation slowing down in widespread and long-living tree taxa: insights from the tropical timber tree genus Milicia (Moraceae)

Kasso Dainou, Grégory Mahy, Jérôme Duminil, Christopher W. Dick, Jean-Louis Doucet, Armel S. L. Donkpégan, Michaël Pluijgers, Brice Sinsin, Philippe Lejeune & Olivier J. Hardy
The long generation time and large effective size of widespread forest tree species can result in slow evolutionary rate and incomplete lineage sorting, complicating species delimitation. We addressed this issue with the African timber tree genus Milicia that comprises two morphologically similar and often confounded species: M. excelsa, widespread from West to East Africa, and M. regia, endemic to West Africa. We combined information from nuclear microsatellites (nSSRs), nuclear and plastid DNA sequences, and morphological...

Data from: The ancient tropical rainforest tree Symphonia globulifera L. f. (Clusiaceae) was not restricted to postulated Pleistocene refugia in Atlantic Equatorial Africa

Myriam Heuertz, Katharina B. Budde, Santiago C. González-Martínez & Olivier J. Hardy
Understanding the history of forests and their species' demographic responses to past disturbances is important for predicting impacts of future environmental changes. Tropical rainforests of the Guineo-Congolian region in Central Africa are believed to have survived the Pleistocene glacial periods in a few major refugia, essentially centred on mountainous regions close to the Atlantic Ocean. We tested this hypothesis by investigating the phylogeographic structure of a widespread, ancient rainforest tree species, Symphonia globulifera L. f....

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