25 Works

Data from: The history of the North African mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U6 gene flow into the African, Eurasian and American continents

Bernard Secher, Rosa Fregel, José M Larruga, Vicente M Cabrera, Phillip Endicott, José J Pestano & Ana M González
Background: Complete mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) genome analyses have greatly improved the phylogeny and phylogeography of human mtDNA. Human mitochondrial DNA haplogroup U6 has been considered as a molecular signal of a Paleolithic return to North Africa of modern humans from southwestern Asia. Results: Using 230 complete sequences we have refined the U6 phylogeny, and improved the phylogeographic information by the analysis of 761 partial sequences. This approach provides chronological limits for its arrival to Africa,...

Data from: Automated peak detection method for behavioral event identification: detecting Balaenoptera musculus and Grampus griseus feeding attempts

David A. Sweeney, Stacy L. DeRuiter, Ye Joo McNamara-Oh, Tiago A. Marques, Patricia Arranz & John Calambokidis
The desire of animal behaviorists for more flexible methods of conducting inter-study and inter-specific comparisons and meta-analysis of various animal behaviors compelled us to design an automated, animal behavior peak detection method that is potentially generalizable to a wide variety of data types, animals, and behaviors. We detected the times of feeding attempts by 12 Risso’s dolphins (Grampus griseus) and 36 blue whales (Balaenoptera musculus) using the norm-jerk (rate of change of acceleration) time series....

Data from: A geographical distribution database of the genus Dysdera in the Canary Islands (Araneae, Dysderidae)

Nuria Macías-Hernández, Salvador De La Cruz López, Marcos Roca-Cusachs, Pedro Oromí & Miquel A. Arnedo
The ground-dweller spider genus Dysdera shows very high species richness on the oceanic archipelago of the Canary Islands, providing one of the most outstanding examples of island radiation among spiders, only paralleled by Tetragnatha spiders on the Hawaiian archipelago. A georeferenced database of the 48 Dysdera species occurring in the Canary Islands was assembled to facilitate ongoing and future research on this remarkable lineage. All species are endemic to the archipelago except for the cosmopolitan...

Evolutionary winners are ecological losers among oceanic island plants

José María Fernández-Palacios, Rüdiger Otto, Michael K. Borregaard, Holger Kreft, Jonathan P. Price, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Patrick Weigelt & Robert J. Whittaker
Aim: Adaptive radiation, in which successful lineages proliferate by exploiting untapped niche space, provides a popular but potentially misleading characterization of evolution on oceanic islands. Here we analyse the respective roles of members of in situ diversified vs. non-diversified lineages in shaping the main ecosystems of an archipelago to explore the relationship between evolutionary and ecological ‘success’. Location: Canary Islands. Taxon: Vascular plants. Methods: We quantified the abundance/rarity of the native flora according to the...

Mutable Artistic Narratives: Video Art versus Glitch Art

Ana Marqués Ibáñez

Data from: Establishment of a coastal fish in the Azores: recent colonisation or sudden expansion of an ancient relict population?

Sergio Stefanni, Rita Castilho, Maria Sala-Bozano, Joana I. Robalo, Sara M. Francisco, Ricardo S. Santos, Nuno Marques, Alberto Brito, Vitor C. Almada & Stefano Mariani
The processes and timescales associated with ocean-wide changes in the distribution of marine species have intrigued biologists since Darwin’s earliest insights into biogeography. The Azores, a mid-Atlantic volcanic archipelago located >1000 km off the European continental shelf, offers ideal opportunities to investigate phylogeographic colonisation scenarios. The benthopelagic sparid fish known as the common two-banded seabream (Diplodus vulgaris) is now relatively common along the coastline of the Azores archipelago, but was virtually absent before the 1990s....

Data from: Climate vs. topography – spatial patterns of plant species diversity and endemism on a high-elevation island

Severin D. H. Irl, David E. V. Harter, Manuel J. Steinbauer, David Gallego Puyol, José María Fernández-Palacios, Anke Jentsch & Carl Beierkuhnlein
1. Climate and topography are among the most fundamental drivers of plant diversity. Here, we assess the importance of climate and topography in explaining diversity patterns of species richness, endemic richness and endemicity on the landscape scale of an oceanic island, and evaluate the independent contribution of climatic and topographic variables to spatial diversity patterns. 2. We constructed a presence/absence matrix of perennial endemic and native vascular plant species (including subspecies) in 890 plots on...

Human impact, climate and dispersal strategies determine plant invasion on islands

Severin D. H. Irl, Andreas H. Schweiger, Manuel J. Steinbauer, Claudine Ah-Peng, José R. Arévalo, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Alessandro Chiarucci, Curtis C. Daehler, José M. Fernández-Palacios, Olivier Flores, Christoph Kueffer, Petr Madera, Rüdiger Otto, Julienne M. I. Schweiger, Dominique Strasberg & Anke Jentsch
Aim: Biological invasions are likely determined by species dispersal strategies as well as environmental characteristics of a recipient region, especially climate and human impact. However, the contribution of climatic factors, human impact and dispersal strategies in driving invasion processes is still controversial and not well embedded in the existing theoretical considerations. Here, we study how climate, species dispersal strategies and human impact determine plant invasion processes on islands distributed in all major oceans in the...

Data from: Contrasts in the marine ecosystem of two Macaronesian islands: a comparison between the remote Selvagens Reserve and Madeira Island

Alan M. Friedlander, Enric Ballesteros, Sabrina Clemente, Emanuel J. Gonçalves, Andrew Estep, Paul Rose & Enric Sala
The islands of Madeira and Selvagens are less than 300 km apart but offer a clear contrast between a densely populated and highly developed island (Madeira), and a largely uninhabited and remote archipelago (Selvagens) within Macaronesia in the eastern Atlantic. The Madeira Archipelago has ~260,000 inhabitants and receives over six million visitor days annually. The Selvagens Islands Reserve is one of the oldest nature reserves in Portugal and comprises two islands and several islets, including...

Data from: Evidence for mega-landslides as drivers of island colonization

Víctor García-Olivares, Heriberto López, Jairo Patiño, Nadir Alvarez, Antonio Machado, Juan Carlos Carrecedo, Vicente Soler, Brent C. Emerson & Juan Carlos Carracedo
Aim: How non-dispersive taxa colonize islands is generalized as being by wind, or rafting, with the implicit assumption that such events involve one (wind) or a few (rafting) individuals. However, because of the evolutionary time-scale for colonization events, the fit of individual species to a conceptual model of wind or rafting is difficult to assess. Here, we describe an alternative testable geological model for inter-island colonization that can result in larger effective founding population sizes...

Data from: Network analysis by simulated annealing of taxa and islands of Macaronesia (North Atlantic Ocean)

Giancarlo Torre, Silvia Fernández Lugo, Riccardo Guarino & José María Fernández-Palacios
With the aim of explaining the role that taxa and island features have in biogeographical patterns, we processed presence-absence matrices of all the Macaronesian native species of ten different taxa (arthropods, birds, bryophytes, fungi, lichens, mammals, mollusks, pteridophytes, reptiles and spermatophytes) through simulated annealing analysis. Distribution patterns among the archipelagos were pinpointed, along with the different biogeographic roles played by islands and species groups. All the networks analysed resulted to be significantly modular and the...

Data from: Overall dynamic body acceleration measures activity differently on large vs small aquatic animals

Lucía Martina Martín López, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Peter Teglberg Madsen & Mark Johnson
Acceleration-based proxies for activity and energy expenditure are widely used in bio-logging studies of animal movement and locomotion to explore biomechanical strategies, energetic costs of behaviour, habitat use and the impact of anthropogenic disturbance. The foremost such proxy is Overall Dynamic Body Acceleration (ODBA) along with variants VeDBA and PDBA. This technique, which involves summing the magnitude of high-pass-filtered acceleration signals (the so-called dynamic acceleration) over a reference interval, has been applied to animals as...

Data from: Community assembly and metaphylogeography of soil biodiversity: insights from haplotype-level community DNA metabarcoding within an oceanic island

Carmelo Andújar Fernández, Paula Arribas, Heriberto López, Yurena Arjona, Antonio José Pérez-Delgado, Pedro Oromí, Alfried P. Vogler & Brent C. Emerson
Most of our understanding of island diversity comes from the study of aboveground systems, while the patterns and processes of diversification and community assembly for belowground biotas remain poorly understood. Here we take advantage of a relatively young and dynamic oceanic island to advance our understanding of eco-evolutionary processes driving community assembly within soil mesofauna. Using whole organism community DNA (wocDNA) metabarcoding and the recently developed metaMATE pipeline, we have generated spatially explicit and reliable...

Data from: A combined field survey and molecular identification protocol for comparing forest arthropod biodiversity across spatial scales

Brent C. Emerson, Juliane Casquet, Heriberto López, Pedro Cardoso, Paulo A. V. Borges, Noémy Mollaret, Pedro Oromí, Dominique Strasberg & Christophe Thébaud
Obtaining fundamental biodiversity metrics such as alpha, beta and gamma diversity for arthropods is often complicated by a lack of prior taxonomic information and/or taxonomic expertise, which can result in unreliable morphologically based estimates. We provide a set of standardized ecological and molecular sampling protocols that can be employed by researchers whose taxonomic skills may be limited, and where there may be a lack of robust a priori information regarding the regional pool of species....

Data from: An expanded molecular phylogeny of Plumbaginaceae, with emphasis on Limonium (sea lavenders): taxonomic implications and biogeographic considerations

Konstantina Koutroumpa, Spyros Theodoridis, Ben H. Warren, Ares Jiménez, Ferhat Celep, Musa Doğan, Maria M. Romeiras, Arnoldo Santos-Guerra, José María Fernández-Palacios, Juli Caujapé-Castells, Mónica Moura, Miguel M. Sequeira, Elena Conti & Miguel Menezes De Sequeira
Plumbaginaceae is characterized by a history of multiple taxonomic rearrangements and lacks a broad molecular phylogenetic framework. Limonium is the most species‐rich genus of the family with ca. 600 species and cosmopolitan distribution. Its center of diversity is the Mediterranean region, where ca. 70% of all Limonium species are endemic. In this study, we sample 201 Limonium species covering all described infrageneric entities and spanning its wide geographic range, along with 64 species of other...

Speciation in the abyss - genomics and morphology reveal a new species of beaked whale

Emma L. Carroll, Michael R. McGowen, Morgan L. McCarthy, Felix G. Marx, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Merel L. Dalebout, Sascha Dreyer, Oscar E. Gaggiotti, Sabine S. Hansen, Anton Van Helden, Aubrie B. Onoufriou, Robin W. Baird, C. Scott Baker, Simon Berrow, Danielle Cholewiak, Diane Claridge, Rochelle Constantine, Nicholas J. Davison, Catarina Eira, R. Ewan Fordyce, John Gatesy, G. J. Greg Hofmeyr, Vidal Martin, James G. Mead, Antonio A. Mignucci-Giannoni … & Morten T. Olsen
Earth’s deep oceans remains less well understood than the surface of Mars. Beaked whales (ziphiids) are among the most visible inhabitants of the abyss, due to their large size and worldwide distribution, yet their diversity and ecology remain obscure. We combine genomic and morphometric analyses to reveal a new Southern Hemisphere ziphiid species, Ramari’s beaked whale, Mesoplodon eueu, whose name is linked to the Indigenous people of the lands from which the species holotype and...

Long-term cloud forest response to climate warming revealed by insect speciation history

Antonia Salces-Castellano, Sean Stankowski, Paula Arribas, Jairo Patiño, Dirk N. Karger, Roger Butlin & Brent C. Emerson
Montane cloud forests are areas of high endemism, and are one of the more vulnerable terrestrial ecosystems to climate change. Thus, understanding how they both contribute to the generation of biodiversity, and will respond to ongoing climate change, are important and related challenges. The widely accepted model for montane cloud forest dynamics involves upslope forcing of their range limits with global climate warming. However, limited climate data provides some support for an alternative model, where...

Changes in community-weighted trait mean, functional diversity, soil chemical properties and temperature along an elevational gradient in Tenerife, Canary Islands

Amanda Ratier Backes, Larissa Frey, José Ramón Arévalo & Sylvia Haider
This dataset comprises community-weighted trait means and functional diversity of leaf traits, chemical soil properties and temperature recorded in roadside (disturbed) and interior (less disturbed) plots, along an elevational gradient of 2,300 m in Tenerife, Canary Islands. The leaf traits measured were specific leaf area (SLA), nitrogen, nitrogen to phosphorus ratio, leaf dry matter content (LDMC) and carbon to phosphorus ratio. The soil chemical properties measured were pH, nitrogen, nitrogen to phosphorus ratio, carbon to...

Data from: The sea urchin Diadema africanum uses low resolution vision to find shelter and deter enemies

John D. Kirwan, Micheal J. Bok, Jochen Smolka, James J. Foster, Jose Carlos Hernandez & Dan-Eric Nilsson
Many sea urchins can detect light on their body surface and some species are reported to possess image-resolving vision. Here we measure the spatial resolution of vision in the long-spined sea urchin Diadema africanum, using two different visual responses: a taxis towards dark objects and an alarm response of spine-pointing towards looming stimuli. For the taxis response we used isoluminant visual stimuli to discriminate spatial vision from phototaxis. Individual animals were placed in the centre...

Data from: Endemic plant species are more palatable to introduced herbivores than non-endemics

Jonay Cubas, Severin Irl, Rafael Villafuerte, Víctor Bello-Rodríguez, Juan Rodríguez-Luengo, Marcelino Del Arco, José Martín-Esquivel & Juana González-Mancebo
Islands harbour a spectacular diversity and unique species composition. This uniqueness is mainly a result of endemic species that have evolved in-situ in the absence of mammal herbivores. However, island endemism is under severe threat by introduced herbivores. We test the assumption that endemic species are particularly vulnerable to generalist introduced herbivores (European rabbit) using an unprecedented dataset covering an entire island with enormous topographic, climatic and biological diversity (Tenerife, Canary Islands). With increasing endemism,...

Climate drives community-wide divergence within species over a limited spatial scale: evidence from an oceanic island

Antonia Salces-Castellano, Jairo Patiño, Nadir Alvarez, Carmelo Andújar, Paula Arribas, Juan J. Braojos-Ruiz, Marcelino Del Arco-Aguilar, Víctor García-Olivares, Dirk Karger, Heriberto López, Ioanna Manolopoulou, Pedro Oromí, Antonio J. Pérez-Delgado, William W. Peterman, Kenneth F. Rijsdijk & Brent C. Emerson
Geographic isolation substantially contributes to species endemism on oceanic islands when speciation involves the colonisation of a new island. However, less is understood about the drivers of speciation within islands. What is lacking is a general understanding of the geographic scale of gene flow limitation within islands, and thus the geographic scale and drivers of geographical speciation within insular contexts. Using a community of beetle species, we show that when dispersal ability and climate tolerance...

Controls of chlorophyll fluorescence spectra vary among leaves in a boreal forest and over a spring recovery of photosynthesis

Paulina Rajewicz, Chao Zhang, Jon Atherton, Shari Van Wittenberghe, Anu Riikonen, Troy Magney, Beatriz Fernandez-Marin, Jose Ignacio Garcia Plazaola & Albert Porcar-Castell
Chlorophyll fluorescence can be used to track to seasonal dynamics of photosynthesis in boreal forests. However, the relationship between chlorophyll fluorescence and photosynthesis is affected by biochemical and morphological factors, which vary across time and space as a function of light environment, species, and environmental conditions. We investigated how various factors, and their spatio-temporal dynamics during spring recovery of photosynthesis in a boreal forest, affect spatio-temporal variation in chlorophyll fluorescence spectra. The factors under consideration...

Data on infection experiments of cane toads

Martin Mayer, Lia Schlippe Justicia, Richard Shine & Gregory Brown
This dataset contains data from an infection experiment described in the paper: “Mayer, M., Schlippe Justicia, L, Shine, R., & Brown, G. P. (2021). Host defense or parasite cue: Skin secretions mediate interactions between amphibians and their parasites. Ecology Letters, in revision”. Amphibian skin secretions (substances produced by the amphibian plus microbiota) plausibly act as a first line of defense against parasite/pathogen attack, but may also provide chemical cues for pathogens. To clarify the role...

Echolocating toothed whales use ultra-fast echo-kinetic responses to track evasive prey

Heather Vance, Peter Madsen, Natacha Aguilar De Soto, Danuta Wisniewska, Michael Ladegaard, Sascha Hooker & Mark Johnson
Visual predators rely on fast-acting optokinetic responses to track and capture agile prey. Most toothed whales, however, rely on echolocation for hunting and have converged on biosonar clicking rates reaching 500/s during prey pu rsuits. If echoes are processed on a click by click basis, as assumed, neural responses 100x faster than those in vision are required to keep pace with this information flow. Using high resolution bio-logging of wild predator prey interactions we show...

Deep-diving beaked whales dive together but forage apart

Jesús Alcázar Treviño, Mark Johnson, Patricia Arranz, Victoria Warren, Carlos Pérez-González, Tiago Marques, Peter Madsen & Natacha Aguilar De Soto
Echolocating animals that forage in social groups can potentially benefit from eavesdropping on other group members, cooperative foraging or social defence, but may also face problems of acoustic interference and intra-group competition for prey. Here, we investigated these potential trade-offs of sociality for extreme deep-diving Blainville´s and Cuvier’s beaked whales. These species perform highly synchronous group dives as a presumed predator-avoidance behaviour but the benefits and costs of this on foraging have not been investigated....

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Affiliations

  • University of La Laguna
    25
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