43 Works

Data from: Colour lightness of dragonfly assemblages across North America and Europe

Stefan Pinkert, Roland Brandl & Dirk Zeuss
Dark-coloured ectotherms absorb energy from the environment at higher rates than light-coloured ectotherms. The thermal melanism hypothesis (TMH) states that this physical mechanism links the colour lightness of the body surfaces of ectotherms to their thermal environment and hence to their geographical distribution. Studies on different insect taxa in Europe found support for this prediction of the TMH. However, whether these results hold also for other biogeographical regions remains unclear. Here, we quantify and map...

Data from: Random-close packing limits for monodisperse and polydisperse hard spheres

Vasili Baranau & Ulrich Tallarek
We investigate how the densities of inherent structures, which we refer to as the closest jammed configurations, are distributed for packings of 10000 frictionless hard spheres. A computational algorithm is introduced to generate closest jammed configurations and determine corresponding densities. Closest jamming densities for monodisperse packings generated with high compression rates using Lubachevsky–Stillinger and force-biased algorithms are distributed in a narrow density range from φ = 0.634-0.636 to φ ≈ 0.64; closest jamming densities for...

Data from: Specific 50-kHz vocalizations are tightly linked to particular types of behavior in juvenile rats anticipating play

Candace J. Burke, Theresa M. Kisko, Hilarie Swiftwolfe, Sergio M. Pellis & David R. Euston
Rat ultrasonic vocalizations have been suggested to be either a byproduct of physical movement or, in the case of 50-kHz calls, a means to communicate positive affect. Yet there are up to 14 distinct types of 50-kHz calls, raising issues for both explanations. To discriminate between these theories and address the purpose for the numerous 50-kHz call types, we studied single juvenile rats that were waiting to play with a partner, a situation associated with...

Data from: Multiple choice: hemiparasite performance in multi-species mixtures

Tobias Michael Sandner & Diethart Matthies
Hemiparasitic plants have green leaves, but extract water and solutes from neighbouring plants. It is still poorly understood how different host plants in communities contribute to parasite performance, as species that are good hosts in single-host experiments may not necessarily be preferred hosts in mixtures. We grew the root hemiparasite Rhinanthus alectorolophus (Orobanchaceae) together with each of 13 host species (experiment 1) and with 15 different four-species mixtures of these hosts (exp. 2) that differed...

Data from: Temperature-driven colour lightness and body size variation scale to local assemblages of European Odonata but are modified by propensity for dispersal

Daniel Acquah-Lamptey, Martin Braendle, Roland Brandl & Stefan Pinkert
Previous macrophysiological studies suggested that temperature-driven colour lightness and body size variations strongly influence biogeographical patterns in ectotherms. However, these trait-environment relationships scale to local assemblages and the extent to which they can be modified by dispersal remains largely unexplored. We test whether the predictions of the thermal melanism hypothesis and the Bergmann’s rule hold for local assemblages. We also assess whether these trait-environment relationships are more important for species adapted to less stable (lentic)...

Data from: Species richness-productivity relationships of tropical terrestrial ferns at regional and local scales

Michael Kessler, Laura Salazar, Jürgen Homeier & Jürgen Kluge
1. The species richness-productivity relationship (SRPR), by which the species richness of habitats or ecosystems is related to the productivity of the ecosystem or the taxon, has been documented both on regional and local scales, but its generality, biological meaning, and underlying mechanisms remain debated. 2. We evaluated the SRPR and 3 mechanistic hypotheses using terrestrial ferns in 18 study plots along an elevational gradient (500-4000 m) in Ecuador. We measured annual increases in above-ground...

Data from: Variation in neighbourhood context shapes frugivore-mediated facilitation and competition among co-dispersed plant species

Jörg Albrecht, Victoria Bohle, Dana Berens, Bogdan Jaroszewicz, Nuria Selva, Nina Farwig & Dana G. Berens
1. Co-occurring and simultaneously fruiting plant species may either compete for dispersal by shared frugivores, or enhance each other's dispersal through joint attraction of frugivores. While competitive plant–plant interactions are expected to cause the evolutionary divergence of fruit phenologies, facilitative interactions are assumed to promote their convergence. To which extent competitive and facilitative interactions among plant species with similar phenological niches are controlled by spatial variation in their local abundance and co-occurrence is poorly understood....

Data from: Effects of zoochory on the spatial genetic structure of plant populations

Tiziana A. Gelmi-Candusso, Eckhard W. Heymann & Katrin Heer
Spatial genetic structure (SGS) of plants results from the non-random distribution of related individuals. SGS provides information on gene flow and spatial patterns of genetic diversity within populations. Seed dispersal creates the spatial template for plant distribution. Thus, in zoochorous plants, dispersal mode and disperser behavior might have a strong impact on SGS. However, many studies only report the taxonomic group of seed dispersers, without further details. The recent increase in studies on SGS provides...

Data from: De novo assembly and comparative analysis of the Ceratodon purpureus transcriptome

Péter Szövényi, Pierre-François Perroud, Aikaterini Symeonidi, Sean Stevenson, Ralph S. Quatrano, Stefan A. Rensing, Andrew C. Cuming & Stuart F. McDaniel
The bryophytes are a morphologically and ecologically diverse group of plants that have recently emerged as major model systems for a variety of biological processes. In particular, the genome sequence of the moss, Physcomitrella patens, has significantly enhanced our understanding of the evolution of developmental processes in land plants. However, to fully explore the diversity within bryophytes, we need additional genomic resources. Here we describe analyses of the transcriptomes of a male and a female...

Data from: Detection of somatic epigenetic variation in Norway spruce via targeted bisulfite sequencing

Katrin Heer, Kristian K. Ullrich, Manuel Hiss, Sascha Liepelt, Ralf Schulze Brüning, Jiabin Zou, Lars Opgenoorth, Stefan A. Rensing & Jiabin Zhou
Epigenetic mechanisms represent a possible mechanism for achieving a rapid response of long‐lived trees to changing environmental conditions. However, our knowledge on plant epigenetics is largely limited to a few model species. With increasing availability of genomic resources for many tree species, it is now possible to adopt approaches from model species that permit to obtain single‐base pair resolution data on methylation at a reasonable cost. Here, we used targeted bisulfite sequencing (TBS) to study...

Data from: Large birds travel farther in homogeneous environments

Marlee A. Tucker, Olga Alexandrou, , Keith L. Bildstein, Katrin Böhning-Gaese, Chloe Bracis, John N. Brzorad, Evan R. Buechley, David Cabot, Justin M. Calabrese, Carlos Carrapato, André Chiaradia, Lisa C. Davenport, Sarah C. Davidson, Mark Desholm, Christopher R. DeSorbo, Robert Domenech, Peter Enggist, William F. Fagan, Nina Farwig, Wolfgang Fiedler, Christen H. Fleming, Alastair Franke, John M. Fryxell, Clara García-Ripollés … & João Paulo Silva
Aim: Animal movement is an important determinant of individual survival, population dynamics, and ecosystem structure and function. Yet it is still unclear how local movements are related to resource availability and the spatial arrangement of resources. Using resident bird species and migratory bird species outside of the migratory period, we examined how the distribution of resources affect the movement patterns of both large terrestrial birds (e.g., raptors, bustards, hornbills) and waterbirds (e.g., cranes, storks, ducks,...

Data from: Responses of a legume to inbreeding and the intensity of novel and familiar stresses

Finn Rehling, Diethart Matthies & Tobias Sandner
It is often assumed that the negative effects of inbreeding on fitness (inbreeding depression, ID) are particularly strong under stressful conditions. However, ID may be relatively mild under types of stress that plant populations have experienced for a long time, because environment-specific deleterious alleles may already have been purged. We examined the performance of open- and self-pollinated progeny of the short-lived calcareous grassland plant Anthyllis vulneraria under three intensities of each of five types of...

A target enrichment probe set for resolving the flagellate land plant tree of life

Jesse W. Breinholt, Sarah B. Carey, George P. Tiley, E. Christine Davis, Lorena Endara, Stuart F. McDaniel, Leandro Neves, Emily B. Sessa, Matt Von Konrat, Susan Fawcett, Stefanie M. Ickert-Bond, Paulo H. Labiak, Juan Larraín, Marcus Lehnert, Lily R. Lewis, Nathalie S. Nagalingum, Nikisha Patel, Stefan A. Rensing, Weston Testo, Alejandra Vasco, Juan Carlos Villarreal, Evelyn Webb Williams, J. Gordon Burleigh, Sahut Chantanaorrapint, Leandro G. Neves … & Stefanie M. Ickert‐Bond
Premise of the Study: New sequencing technologies enable the possibility of generating large-scale molecular datasets for constructing the plant tree of life. We describe a new probe set for target enrichment sequencing to generate nuclear sequence data to build phylogenetic trees with any flagellate land plants, including hornworts, liverworts, mosses, lycophytes, ferns, and all gymnosperms. Methods and Results: We leveraged existing transcriptome and genome sequence data to design a set of 56,989 probes for target...

Data from: Investigating the zoonotic origin of the West African Ebola epidemic

Almudena Marí Saéz, Sabrina Weiss, Kathrin Nowak, Vincent Lapeyre, Fee Zimmermann, Ariane Düx, Hjalmar S. Kühl, Moussa Kaba, Sébastien Regnaut, Kevin Merkel, Andreas Sachse, Ursula Thiesen, Lili Villányi, Christophe Boesch, Piotr W. Dabrowski, Aleksandar Radonic, Andreas Nitsche, Siv Aina J. Leendertz, Stefan Petterson, Stephan Becker, Verena Krähling, Emmanuel Couacy-Hymann, Chantal Akoua-Koffi, Natalie Weber, Lars Schaade … & Fabian H. Leendertz
The severe Ebola virus disease epidemic occurring in West Africa stems from a single zoonotic transmission event to a 2-year-old boy in Meliandou, Guinea. We investigated the zoonotic origins of the epidemic using wildlife surveys, interviews, and molecular analyses of bat and environmental samples. We found no evidence for a concurrent outbreak in larger wildlife. Exposure to fruit bats is common in the region, but the index case may have been infected by playing in...

Data from: Biodiversity along temperate forest succession

Torben Hilmers, Nicolas Friess, Claus Bässler, Marco Heurich, Roland Brandl, Hans Pretzsch, Rupert Seidl & Jörg Müller
1. The successional dynamics of forests – from canopy openings to regeneration, maturation and decay – influences the amount and heterogeneity of resources available for forest-dwelling organisms. Conservation has largely focused only on selected stages of forest succession (e.g. late-seral stages). However, to develop comprehensive conservation strategies and to understand the impact of forest management on biodiversity, a quantitative understanding of how different trophic groups vary over the course of succession is needed. 2. We...

Data from: Epiphyll specialization for leaf and forest successional stages in a tropical lowland rainforest

Anna Mežaka, Maaike Y. Bader, Noris Salazar Allen & Glenda Mendieta Leiva
Questions The importance of tropical rainforest gap dynamics in biodiversity maintenance is not fully understood, in particular for taxa other than trees and lianas. We used epiphylls on rainforest leaves to study the importance of leaf- and forest-scale succession in determining biodiversity patterns by characterizing community change with leaf age in gaps and closed-forest habitats. We asked: 1. Do epiphylls show specialization for leaf and forest successional stages? 2. Can early and late-successional epiphyllous species...

Data from: Heterogeneous patterns of abundance of epigeic arthropod taxa along a major elevation gradient

Juliane Röder, Florian Detsch, Insa Otte, Tim Appelhans, Thomas Nauss, Marcell K. Peters & Roland Brandl
Species diversity is the variable most commonly studied in recent ecological research. Ecological processes, however, are driven by individuals and affected by their abundances. Understanding the variation in animal abundances along climatic gradients is important for predicting changes in ecosystem processes under global warming. High abundances make arthropods, despite their small body sizes, important actors in food webs, yet abundance distributions of major arthropod taxa along climatic gradients remain poorly documented. We sampled arthropod assemblages...

Data from: LiDAR-derived canopy structure supports the more-individuals hypothesis for arthropod diversity in temperate forests

Jörg Müller, Roland Brandl, Martin Brändle, Bernhard Förster, Bruno Cancian De Araujo, Martin M. Gossner, Alexander Ladas, Martin Wagner, Mark Maraun, Peter Schall, Stefan Schmidt, Marco Heurich, Simon Thorn & Sebastian Seibold
Despite considerable progress in the ability to measure the complex 3-D structure of forests with the improvement of remote-sensing techniques, our mechanistic understanding of how biodiversity is linked to canopy structure is still limited. Here we tested whether the increase in arthropod abundance and richness in beech forest canopies with increasing canopy complexity supports the more-individuals hypothesis or the habitat-heterogeneity hypothesis. We used fogging to collect arthropod samples from 80 standardized plots from canopies of...

Data from: Revisiting the measurement of anomie

Ali Teymoori, Jolanda Jetten, Brock Bastian, Amarina Ariyanto, Frédérique Autin, Nadia Ayub, Constantina Badea, Tomasz Besta, Fabrizio Butera, Rui Costa-Lopes, Lijuan Cui, Carole Fantini, Gillian Finchilesc, Lowell Gaertner, Mario Gollwitzer, Ángel Gómez, Roberto González, Ying Yi Hong, Dorthe Høj Jensen, Minoru Karasawa, Thomas Kessler, Olivier Klein, Marcus Lima, Tuuli Anna Mähönen, Laura Megevand … & Gillian Finchilescu
Sociologists coined the term "anomie" to describe societies that are characterized by disintegration and deregulation. Extending beyond conceptualizations of anomie that conflate the measurements of anomie as 'a state of society' and as a 'state of mind', we disentangle these conceptualizations and develop an analysis and measure of this phenomenon focusing on anomie as a perception of the 'state of society'. We propose that anomie encompasses two dimensions: a perceived breakdown in social fabric (i.e.,...

Host specificity and species colouration mediate the regional decline of nocturnal moths in central European forests

Nicolas Roth, Herrman Hacker, Lea Heidrich, Nicolas Friess, Enrique García-Barros, Jan Habel, Simon Thorn & Jörg Müller
The high diversity of insects has limited the volume of long-term community data with a high taxonomic resolution and considerable geographic replications, especially in forests. Therefore, trends and causes of changes are poorly understood. Here we analyse trends in species richness, abundance and biomass of nocturnal macro moths in three quantitative data sets collected over four decades in forests in southern Germany. Two local data sets, one from coppiced oak forests and one from high...

Changes in hydro-chemical regime characteristics of transboundary Ishim river

Diana Burlibayeva, Almas Tleukulov, Christian Opp & Ivan Kirvel
At the present time there are problems with water supplies to the city of Astana. The problems are related to the quality of water in the Ishim River. In the future, after commissioning of the Satpayev Canal, this problem will become more serious due to the Irtysh River pollution. Because of it, considering the currently observed hydro-chemical regime of the Ishim and Irtysh rivers pollution, the following preventive measures to be taken in advance to...

Data from: Peptidomics-based phylogeny and biogeography of Mantophasmatodea (Hexapoda)

Reinhard Predel, Susanne Neupert, Wolf Huetteroth, Jörg Kahnt, Dietmar Waidelich & Steffen Roth
The insect order Mantophasmatodea was described in 2002. Prior to that time, several generations of entomologists had assumed that all major insect taxa were known; thus, its description was a sensation for zoologists. Since then, a surprising abundance and species diversity of this taxon have been found, particularly in the winter rainfall region of South Africa. To learn more about the evolutionary lineages, speciation, and biogeography of Mantophasmatodea, we applied an unusual peptidomics approach. We...

Data from: Natural habitat loss and exotic plants reduce the functional diversity of flower visitors in a heterogeneous subtropical landscape

Ingo Grass, Dana G. Berens & Nina Farwig
1. Functional diversity (FD) of pollinators can increase plant reproductive output and the stability of plant-pollinator communities. Yet, in times of worldwide pollinator declines, effects of global change on pollinator FD remain poorly understood. Loss of natural habitat and exotic plant invasions are two major drivers of global change that particularly threaten pollinator diversity. 2. In a subtropical South African landscape, we investigated changes in the FD of flower visitor assemblages on native and exotic...

Data from: Detection of SNPs based on transcriptome sequencing in Norway spruce (Picea abies (L.) Karst)

Katrin Heer, Kristian Karsten Ullrich, Sascha Liepelt, Stefan Andreas Rensing, Jiabin Zhou, Birgit Ziegenhagen & Lars Opgenoorth
A novel set of SNPs was derived from transcriptome data of ten Norway spruce (Picea abies) trees from the Bavarian Forest National Park in Germany (BaFoNP). SNPs were identified by mapping against a de-novo transcriptome assembly and against pre-mRNAs of predicted genes of the reference genome assembly. This resulted in 111,849 and 366,577 SNPs, respectively. Out of these, 311 were either randomly selected or chosen because of their pronounced divergence between sampling sites and genotyped...

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