6 Works

Data from: Connectivity in the cold: the comparative population genetics of vent-endemic fauna in the Scotia Sea, Southern Ocean.

Christopher N. Roterman, Jon T. Copley, Katrin T. Linse, Paul A. Tyler & Alex D. Rogers
We report the first comparative population genetics study for vent fauna in the Southern Ocean using cytochrome C oxidase I and microsatellite markers. Three species are examined: the kiwaid squat lobster, Kiwa tyleri, the peltospirid gastropod Gigantopelta chessoia and a lepetodrilid limpet, Lepetodrilus sp. collected from vent fields 440 km apart on the East Scotia Ridge (ESR) and from the Kemp Caldera on the South Sandwich Island Arc, ~95 km eastwards. We report no differentiation...

Data from: Evolutionary factors affecting the cross-species utility of newly developed microsatellite markers in seabirds

Yoshan Moodley, Juan F. Masello, Gopi K. Munimanda, Theresa L. Cole, Marco R. Thali, Rachael Alderman, Richard J. Cuthbert, Manuel Marin, Melanie Massaro, Joan Navarro, Richard A. Phillips, Peter G. Ryan, Cristián G. Suazo, Yves Cherel, Henri Weimerskirch, Petra Quillfeldt & Luciano Calderon
Microsatellite loci are ideal for testing hypotheses relating to genetic segregation at fine spatio-temporal scales. They are also conserved among closely related species, making them potentially useful for clarifying interspecific relationships between recently diverged taxa. However, mutations at primer binding sites may lead to increased nonamplification, or disruptions that may result in decreased polymorphism in nontarget species. Furthermore, high mutation rates and constraints on allele size may also with evolutionary time, promote an increase in...

Data from: The influence of preceding dive cycles on the foraging decisions of Antarctic fur seals

Takashi Iwata, Kentaro Q. Sakamoto, Ewan W. J. Edwards, Ian J. Staniland, Philip N. Trathan, Yusuke Goto, Katsufumi Sato, Yasuhiko Naito & Akinori Takahashi
The foraging strategy of many animals is thought to be determined by their past experiences. However, few empirical studies have investigated whether this is true in diving animals. We recorded three-dimensional movements and mouth-opening events from three Antarctic fur seals during their foraging trips to examine how they adapt their behaviour based on past experience—continuing to search for prey in the same area or moving to search in a different place. Each dive cycle was...

Data from: Contrasting responses of male and female foraging effort to year-round wind conditions

Sue Lewis, Richard A. Phillips, Sarah J. Burthe, Sarah Wanless & Francis Daunt
1. There is growing interest in the effects of wind on wild animals, given evidence that wind speeds are increasing and becoming more variable in some regions, particularly at temperate latitudes. Wind may alter movement patterns or foraging ability, with consequences for energy budgets and, ultimately, demographic rates. 2. These effects are expected to vary among individuals due to intrinsic factors such as sex, age or feeding proficiency. Furthermore, this variation is predicted to become...

Data from: The molecular evolution of spiggin nesting glue in sticklebacks

Paul J. Seear, Ezio Rosato, William P. Goodall-Copestake & Iain Barber
Gene duplication and subsequent divergence can lead to the evolution of new functions and lineage-specific traits. In sticklebacks, the successive duplication of a mucin gene (MUC19) into a tandemly arrayed, multigene family has enabled the production of copious amounts of ‘spiggin’, a secreted adhesive protein essential for nest construction. Here, we examine divergence between spiggin genes among three-spined sticklebacks (Gasterosteus aculeatus) from ancestral marine and derived freshwater populations, and propose underpinning gene duplication mechanisms. Sanger...

Data from: A draft fur seal genome provides insights into factors affecting SNP validation and how to mitigate them

E. Humble, A. Martinez-Barrio, J. Forcada, P.N. Trathan, M.A.S. Thorne, M. Hoffmann, J. B. W. Wolf, J.I. Hoffman, J. I. Hoffman, P. N. Trathan & M. A. S. Thorne
Custom genotyping arrays provide a flexible and accurate means of genotyping single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in a large number of individuals of essentially any organism. However, validation rates, defined as the proportion of putative SNPs that are verified to be polymorphic in a population, are often very low. A number of potential causes of assay failure have been identified, but none have been explored systematically. In particular, as SNPs are often developed from transcriptomes, parameters...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    6

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    6

Affiliations

  • British Antarctic Survey
    6
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    1
  • Natural History Museum of Los Angeles County
    1
  • Centre for Ecology and Hydrology
    1
  • Charles Sturt University
    1
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    1
  • University of Aberdeen
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1
  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    1