7 Works

Data from: Combined bottom-up and top-down pressures drive catastrophic population declines of Arctic skuas in Scotland

Allan Perkins, Norman Ratcliffe, Dave Suddaby, Brian Ribbands, Claire Smith, Pete Ellis, Eric Meek & Mark Bolton
1. Understanding drivers of population change is critical for effective species conservation. In the northeast Atlantic Ocean, recent changes amongst seabird communities are linked to human and climate change impacts on foodwebs. Many species have declined severely, with food shortages and increased predation reducing productivity. Arctic skua Stercorarius parasiticus, a kleptoparasite of other seabirds, is one such species. 2. The aim of the study was to determine relative effects of bottom-up and top-down pressures on...

Data from: Age-related variation in non-breeding foraging behaviour and carry-over effects on fitness in an extremely long-lived bird

Thomas A. Clay, Elizabeth J. Pearmain, Rona A.R. McGill, Andrea Manica, Richard A. Phillips & Rona A. R. McGill
1. Senescence has been widely documented in wild vertebrate populations, yet the proximate drivers of age-related declines in breeding success, including allocation trade-offs and links with foraging performance, are poorly understood. For long-lived, migratory species, the non-breeding period represents a critical time for investment in self-maintenance and restoration of body condition, which in many species is linked to fitness. However, the relationships between age, non-breeding foraging behaviour and fitness remain largely unexplored. 2. We performed...

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: Cryptic niche switching in a chemosymbiotic gastropod

Chong Chen, Katrin Linse, Katsuyuki Uematsu & Julia D. Sigwart
Life stages of some animals, including amphibians and insects, are so different that they have historically been seen as different species. ‘Metamorphosis’ broadly encompasses major changes in organism bodies and, importantly, concomitant shifts in trophic strategies. Many marine animals have a biphasic lifestyle, with small pelagic larvae undergoing one or more metamorphic transformations before settling into a permanent, adult morphology on the benthos. Post-settlement, the hydrothermal vent gastropod Gigantopelta chessoia experiences a further, cryptic metamorphosis...

Data from: Metapopulation dynamics of Roseate Terns: sources, sinks and implications for conservation management decisions

Adam Seward, Norman Ratcliffe, Steve Newton, Richard Caldow, Daniel Piec, Paul Morrison, Tom Cadwallender, Wesley Davies & Mark Bolton
1. Habitat management to restore or create breeding sites may allow metapopulations to increase in size and reduce the risk of demographic stochasticity or disasters causing metapopulation extinction. However, if newly restored or created sites are of low quality, they may act as sinks that draw individuals away from better quality sites to the detriment of metapopulation size. 2. Following intensive conservation effort, the metapopulation of roseate tern (Sterna dougallii) in NW Europe is recovering...

Data from: Competition between co-occurring invasive and native consumers switches between habitats

Nadescha Zwerschke, Henk Van Rein, Chris Harrod, Carl Reddin, Mark C. Emmerson, Dai Roberts, Nessa E. O'Connor & Henk Rein
1. The introduction of a non-native species frequently has adverse direct effects on native species. The underlying mechanisms, however, often remain unclear, in particular where native and invasive species are taxonomically similar. 2. We found evidence of direct competitive interactions between a globally distributed invasive species (the Pacific oyster, Magallana gigas) and its native counterpart (the European oyster, Ostrea edulis). We also discovered that the competitive outcome differed between different habitat types and structures by...

Data from: Detailed insights into pan-European population structure and inbreeding in wild and hatchery Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) populations revealed by genome-wide SNP data

David L.J. Vendrami, Ross D. Houston, Karim Gharbi, Luca Telesca, Alejandro P. Gutierrez, Helen Gurney-Smith, Natsuki Hasegawa, Pierre Boudry, Joseph I. Hoffman & David L. J. Vendrami
Cultivated bivalves are hugely important not only because of their economic value, but also due to their impacts on natural ecosystems. The Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is the world's most heavily cultivated shellfish species and has been introduced to all continents except Antarctica for aquaculture. We therefore used a medium density single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) array to investigate the genetic structure of this species in Europe, where it was introduced during the 1960s and has...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • British Antarctic Survey
    7
  • Queen's University Belfast
    2
  • Royal Society for the Protection of Birds
    2
  • University of Cambridge
    2
  • Trinity College
    1
  • University of Tasmania
    1
  • University of Edinburgh
    1
  • University of New Hampshire
    1
  • University of Southampton
    1
  • Macquarie University
    1