14 Works

Data from: A trait-based framework for discerning drivers of species co-occurrence across heterogeneous landscapes

Brooks A. Kohli, Rebecca C. Terry & Rebecca J. Rowe
Null model analysis of species co-occurrence patterns has long been used to gain insight into community assembly but is often limited to identifying non-random patterns without providing clarity about underlying ecological mechanisms. This challenge is especially apparent when sampling units are spread across a heterogeneous landscape or along an environmental gradient because multiple mechanisms can produce similar co-occurrence patterns. We developed a trait-based approach for discriminating between environmental filtering and biotic interactions as the probable...

Data from: Disentangling elevational richness: a multi-scale hierarchical Bayesian occupancy model of Colorado ant communities

Tim M. Szewczyk & Christy M. McCain
Understanding the forces that shape the distribution of biodiversity across spatial scales is central in ecology and critical to effective conservation. To assess effects of possible richness drivers, we sampled ant communities on four elevational transects across two mountain ranges in Colorado, USA, with seven or eight sites on each transect and twenty repeatedly sampled pitfall trap pairs at each site each for a total of 90 days. With a multi-scale hierarchical Bayesian community occupancy...

Data from: Leaf hydraulic parameters are more plastic in species that experience a wider range of leaf water potentials

Daniel M. Johnson, Z. Carter Berry, Kathyrn V. Baker, Duncan D. Smith, Katherine A. McCulloh, Jean-Christophe Domec & Kathryn V. Baker
1. Many plant species experience large differences in soil moisture availability within a season, potentially leading to a wide range of leaf water potentials (ΨLEAF). In order to decrease the risk of leaf dehydration, among species, there is a continuum ranging from strict control (isohydry) to little control (anisohydry) of minimum ΨLEAF. 2. In central Texas USA, species are exposed to a range of soil moisture from wet springs to hot, dry summers. There are...

Data from: Competition decreases with relatedness and lek size in mole crickets: a role for kin selection?

Kit T. Keane, Warren Booth, Daniel R. Howard, Timothy M. J. Golden & Peggy S. M. Hill
Twenty years ago, Kokko & Lindstrom (1996) introduced the hypothesis that kin selection may drive the evolution of leks, shifting the lek-paradigm away from a competitive framework and spurring research on the relatedness of males on leks. However, support for Kokko & Lindstrom’s kin selection hypothesis has been sparse; most studies have shown related males to occur on leks no more than expected by chance. Additionally, evidence supporting the proposed mechanism is mixed; by joining...

Data from: Spatially explicit abundance estimation of a rare habitat specialist: implications for SECR study design

Thea V. Kristensen & Adrienne I. Kovach
Estimating abundance is an essential component of monitoring and recovery of rare species and spatially explicit capture-recapture (SECR) models provide the means for robust density estimation. Previous work has elucidated principles of SECR study design for large, generalist carnivores, but less attention has been paid to study design considerations for smaller species, with less extensive home ranges. Here we integrated data from an intensive pilot study with simulation modeling to evaluate the influence of survey...

Data from: Plasticity in nesting adaptations of a tidal marsh endemic bird

Bri Benvenuti, Jennifer Walsh, Kathleen M. O'Brien & Adrienne I. Kovach
If individuals can perceive and manage risks, they may alter their behaviors based on prior experience. This expectation may apply to nest site selection of breeding birds, for which adaptive behavioral responses may enhance fitness. Birds that nest in tidal marshes have adapted to the challenges posed primarily by periodic, monthly tidal flooding and secondarily, by predation. We investigated adaptive responses in nesting behavior of the saltmarsh sparrow (Ammodramus caudacutus), an obligate tidal-marsh-breeding bird, using...

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: Computational biomechanical analyses demonstrate similar shell-crushing abilities in modern and ancient arthropods

Russell D. C. Bicknell, Justin A. Ledogar, Stephen Wroe, Benjamin C. Gutzler, Winsor H. Watson, John R. Paterson & Winsor H. Watson
The biology of the extant American horseshoe crab, Limulus polyphemus, is well documented—including its dietary habits, particularly the ability to crush shell with its gnathobasic walking appendages—but virtually nothing is known about the feeding biomechanics of this iconic arthropod. This species is also considered the archetypal functional analogue for a range of extinct groups that have gnathobasic appendages, including eurypterids, trilobites, and some of the earliest arthropods, especially Sidneyia inexpectans from the middle Cambrian (508...

Data from: Bidirectional adaptive introgression between two ecologically divergent sparrow species

Jennifer Walsh, Adrienne I. Kovach, Brian Justin Olsen, W. Gregory Shriver & Irby J. Lovette
Natural hybrid zones can be used to dissect the mechanisms driving key evolutionary processes by allowing us to identify genomic regions important for establishing reproductive isolation and that allow for transfer of adaptive variation. We leverage whole-genome data in a system where two bird species, the saltmarsh (Ammospiza caudacutus) and Nelson’s (A. nelsoni) sparrow, hybridize despite their relatively high background genetic differentiation and past ecological divergence. Adaptive introgression is plausible in this system because Nelson’s...

Data from: Hydrological niche segregation defines forest structure and drought tolerance strategies in a seasonal Amazon forest

Mauro Brum, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Valeriy Ivanov, Heidi Asbjornsen, Scott Saleska, Luciana F. Alves, Deliane Penha, Jadson D. Dias, Luiz E.O.C. Aragão, Fernanda Barros, Paulo Bittencourt, Luciano Pereira & Rafael S. Oliveira
1) Understanding if and how trees coordinate rooting depth and aboveground hydraulic traits to define drought-resistance strategies in seasonal Amazon forests is a major gap to model parametrization aimed at predicting the effects of climate change in these ecosystems. 2) We assessed the rooting depth of 12 dominant tree species (representing ~ 42% of the forest basal area) in a seasonal Amazon forest, using the stable isotope ratios (δ18O and δ²H) of water collected from...

Data from: Guidelines and considerations for designing field experiments simulating precipitation extremes in forest ecosystems

Heidi Asbjornsen, John L. Campbell, Katie A. Jennings, Matthew A. Vadeboncoeur, Cameron McIntire, Pamela H. Templer, Richard P. Phillips, Taryn L. Bauerle, Michael C. Dietze, Serita D. Frey, Peter M. Groffman, Rosella Guerrieri, Paul J. Hanson, Eric P. Kelsey, Alan K. Knapp, Nathan G. McDowell, Patrick Meir, Kimberly A. Novick, Scott V. Ollinger, Will T. Pockman, Paul G. Schaberg, Stan D. Wullschleger, Melinda D. Smith & Lindsey E. Rustad
1. Context. Precipitation regimes are changing in response to climate change, yet understanding of how forest ecosystems respond to extreme droughts and pluvials remains incomplete. As future precipitation extremes will likely fall outside the range of historical variability, precipitation manipulation experiments (PMEs) are critical to advancing knowledge about potential ecosystem responses. However, few PMEs have been conducted in forests compared to short-statured ecosystems, and forest PMEs have unique design requirements and constraints. Moreover, past forest...

Data from: Crop rotational diversity enhances belowground communities and functions in an agroecosystem

L. K. Tiemann, A. S. Grandy, E. E. Atkinson, E. Marin-Spiotta & M. D. McDaniel
Biodiversity loss, an important consequence of agricultural intensification, can lead to reductions in agroecosystem functions and services. Increasing crop diversity through rotation may alleviate these negative consequences by restoring positive aboveground–belowground interactions. Positive impacts of aboveground biodiversity on belowground communities and processes have primarily been observed in natural systems. Here, we test for the effects of increased diversity in an agroecosystem, where plant diversity is increased over time through crop rotation. As crop diversity increased...

Data from: Sex-biased transcriptomic response of the reproductive axis to stress

Rebecca M. Calisi, Suzanne H. Austin, Andrew S. Lang & Matthew D. MacManes
Stress is a well-known cause of reproductive dysfunction in many species, including birds, rodents, and humans, though males and females may respond differently. A powerful way to investigate how stress affects re- production is by examining its effects on a biological system essential for regulating reproduction, the hy- pothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis. Often this is done by observing how a stressor affects the amount of glucocorticoids, such as cortisol or corticosterone, circulating in the blood and...

Data from: Predictors of Phytophthora diversity and community composition in natural areas across diverse Australian ecoregions

Treena I. Burgess, Keith L. McDougall, Peter M. Scott, Giles E. Hardy, Jeff Garnas & Giles E. StJ. Hardy
Comprehensive understanding of the patterns and drivers of microbial diversity at a landscape scale is in its infancy, despite the recent ease by which soil communities can be characterized using massively parallel amplicon sequencing. Here we report on a comprehensive analysis of the drivers of diversity distribution and composition of the ecologically and economically important Phytophthora genus from 414 soil samples collected across Australia. We assessed 22 environmental and seven categorical variables as potential predictors...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    14

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    14

Affiliations

  • University of New Hampshire
    14
  • Duke University
    2
  • University of Wisconsin-Madison
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Plymouth State University
    1
  • University of Pretoria
    1
  • École Nationale Supérieure des Sciences Agronomiques de Bordeaux-Aquitaine
    1
  • University of Michigan-Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of California System
    1
  • Murdoch University
    1