11 Works

Wolves are back: Sociopolitical identity and opinions on management of Canis lupus

Joel Hartter & Lawrence Hamilton
In 2010 an interdisciplinary team of social and natural scientists began a project to study society–environment interactions in northeast Oregon. At first, the Communities and Forests in Oregon (CAFOR) project focused on Baker, Union and Wallowa Counties. Subsequently the project’s scope expanded to cover Crook, Grant, Umatilla and Wheeler Counties. One part of the CAFOR research involved a series of telephone surveys carried out in four stages over 2011 to 2018. The surveys employed consistent...

Immature Sirex noctilio woodwasp size and sex dataset

Jeff Garnas
Resource quality can have direct or indirect effects on female oviposition choice, offspring growth and survival, and ultimately on body size and sex ratio. We examined these patterns in Sirex noctilio Fabricus, the globally invasive European pine woodwasp, in South African Pinus patula plantations. We studied how tree position as well as natural variation in biotic and abiotic factors influenced sex-specific density, larval size, tunnel length, male proportion, and survival across development. Twenty infested trees...

Water Balance Model (WBM) simulations of the Upper Snake River Basin 2008-2017

Shan Zuidema

Regional Invasive Species & Climate Change Management Challenge: Prioritizing range-shifting invasive plants High-impact species coming to the Northeast

Bethany A. Bradley, Jenica M. Allen, Bridget Griffin, Brittany B. Laginhas & Mei Rocwell-Postel
Prevention of new invasions is a cost-effective way to manage invasive species and is most effective when emerging invaders are identified and prioritized before they arrive. Climate change is projected to bring nearly 100 new invasive plants to the Northeast. However, these plants are likely to have different types of impacts, making some a higher concern than others. Here, we summarize the results of original RISCC research that identifies high priority, range-shifting invasive plants based...

Georeferenced phylogenetic analysis of a global collection of wild and cultivated Citrullus species

Enoch Gbenato Achigan-Dako, Herve Degbey, Iago Hale & Frank Blattner
The geographical origin of watermelon (Citrullus lanatus) remains debated. While a first hypothesis suggests the center of origin to be west Africa, where a sister endemic species C. mucosospermus thrives, a second hypothesis suggests north-eastern Africa where the white-fleshed Sudanese Kordophan melon is cultivated. In this study, we infer biogeographical and haplotype genealogy for C. lanatus, C. mucosospermus, C. amarus, and C. colocynthis using non-coding cpDNA sequences (trnT-trnL and ndhF-rpl32 regions) from a global collection...

Meta-analysis of glucose tracing studies

Kevin Geyer, Joerg Schnecker, Stuart Grandy, Andreas Richter & Serita Frey
A longstanding assumption of glucose tracing experiments is that all glucose is microbially utilized during short incubations of ≤2 days to become microbial biomass or carbon dioxide. Carbon use efficiency (CUE) estimates have consequently ignored the formation of residues (non-living microbial products) although such materials could represent an important sink of glucose that is prone to stabilization as soil organic matter. We examined the dynamics of microbial residue formation from a short tracer experiment with...

Ecosystem services enhanced through soundscape management link people and wildlife

Mitch Levenhagen, Zachary Miller, Alissa Petrelli, Lauren Ferguson, Yau-Huo Shr, Dylan Gomes, Derrick Taff, Crow White, Kurt Fristrup, Christopher Monz, Christopher McClure, Peter Newman, Clinton Francis & Jesse Barber
Burgeoning urbanization, development and human activities have led to reduced opportunities for nature experience in quiet acoustic environments. Increasing noise affects both humans and wildlife alike. We experimentally altered human-caused sound levels in a paired study using informational signs that encouraged quiet behaviours in week-on, week-off blocks on the trail system of Muir Woods National Monument, California, USA to test if the soundscape influences both wildlife and human experiences. Using continuous measurements from acoustic recording...

EK80 Water Column Sonar Data Collected During BordelonMC20

Scott Loranger & Thomas Webber

Habitat openness and edge avoidance predict saltmarsh sparrow abundance better than habitat area

Hallie Marshall, Erik Blomberg, Valerie Watson, Meaghan Conway, Jonathan Cohen, Maureen Correll, Chris Elphick, Thomas Hodgman, Alison Kocek, Adrienne Kovach, W. Gregory Shriver, Whitney Wiest & Brian Olsen
The Saltmarsh Sparrow (Ammospiza caudacuta) is a tidal marsh bird facing rapid population decline throughout its range, largely caused by degradation and loss of breeding habitat. Thus there is a need to preserve tidal marshes in the northeastern United States, but to do so requires an understanding of the habitat features that support robust populations. Previous studies have shown Saltmarsh Sparrow abundance increases with marsh size, but in similar bird species, area sensitivity is more...

Long-term evidence shows crop-rotation diversification increases agricultural resilience to adverse growing conditions in North America

Timothy Bowles, Maria Mooshammer, Yvonne Socolar, Franciso Calderón, Michel Cavigelli, Steve Culman, William Dean, Axel Garcia Y Garcia, Amélie Gaudin, W Scott Harkom, Michael Lehman, Shannon Osborne, G Philip Robertson, Jonathan Salerno, Marty Schmer, Jeffrey Strock, A Stuart Grandy & Craig Drury
A grand challenge facing humanity is how to produce food for a growing population in the face of a changing climate and environmental degradation. Though empirical evidence remains sparse, management strategies that increase environmental sustainability, like increasing agroecosystem diversity through crop rotations, may also increase resilience to weather extremes without sacrificing yields. We used multilevel regression analyses of long-term crop yield datasets across a continental precipitation gradient to assess how temporal crop diversification affects maize...

Regional Invasive Species & Climate Change Management Challenge: Gardening with climate-smart native plants in the Northeast

Bethany A. Bradley, Amanda Bayer, Bridget Griffin, Sydni Joubran, Brittany B. Laginhas, Lara Munro, Sam Talbot, Jenica M. Allen, Audrey Barker-Plotkin, Evelyn M. Beaury, Carrie Brown-Lima, Emily J. Fusco, Hayley Mount, Bailey Servais & Toni Lyn Morelli
An estimated 80% of ornamental plants for sale are non-native. This means that the average yard does a poor job of supporting native flora and fauna. By shifting our plantings towards natives, we can dramatically increase the diversity of bees, butterflies, birds and other animals. In contrast, non-native plants do not support local food webs and can become invasive. Native plants increase biodiversity and reduce risks associated with invasive species, which supports resilient ecosystems in...

Registration Year

  • 2020
    11

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    9
  • Text
    2

Affiliations

  • University of New Hampshire
    11
  • University of Massachusetts Amherst
    2
  • Pennsylvania State University
    2
  • California Polytechnic State University
    1
  • Utah State University
    1
  • SUNY College of Environmental Science and Forestry
    1
  • The Ohio State University
    1
  • University of Minnesota
    1
  • University of Maine
    1
  • University of California, Berkeley
    1