32 Works

Data from: Contrasting patterns of gene flow for Amazonian snakes that actively forage and those that wait in ambush

Rafael De Fraga, Albertina P. Lima, William E. Magnusson, Miquéias Ferrão & Adam J. Stow
Knowledge of genetic structure, geographic distance and environmental heterogeneity can be used to identify environmental features and natural history traits that influence dispersal and gene flow. Foraging mode is a trait that might predict dispersal capacity in snakes, because actively foragers typically have greater movement rates than ambush predators. Here we test the hypothesis that two actively foraging snakes have higher levels of gene flow than two ambush predators. We evaluated these four co-distributed species...

Data from: Does detection range matter for inferring social networks in a benthic shark using acoustic telemetry?

Johann Mourier, Nathan Charles Bass, Tristan L. Guttridge, Joanna Day & Culum Brown
Accurately estimating contacts between animals can be critical in ecological studies such as examining social structure, predator–prey interactions or transmission of information and disease. While biotelemetry has been used successfully for such studies in terrestrial systems, it is still under development in the aquatic environment. Acoustic telemetry represents an attractive tool to investigate spatio-temporal behaviour of marine fish and has recently been suggested for monitoring underwater animal interactions. To evaluate the effectiveness of acoustic telemetry...

Data from: Landscape context explains changes in the functional diversity of regenerating forests better than climate or species richness

Michael Sams, Hao Ran Lai, Stephen Bonser, Peter Vesk, Robert Kooyman, Daniel Metcalfe, John W. Morgan, Margaret Mayfield, M. A. Sams, D. J. Metcalfe, R. M. Kooyman & P. A. Vesk
Aim A rich literature on forest succession provides general expectations for the steps forests go through while reassembling after disturbance, yet we still have a surprisingly poor understanding of why the outcomes of forest recovery after logging (or other disturbances) vary so extensively. In this paper, we test the hypothesis that regional species pool, system productivity, climate and landscape structure are important drivers of forest reassembly outcomes. Location Transect 1,500 km in length along the...

Data from: Shoot growth of woody trees and shrubs is predicted by maximum plant height and associated traits

Sean M. Gleason, Andrea E.A. Stephens, Wade C. Tozer, Chris J. Blackman, Don W. Butler, Yvonne Chang, Alicia M. Cook, Julia Cooke, Claire A. Laws, Julieta A. Rosell, Stephanie A. Stuart, Mark Westoby & Andrea E. A. Stephens
1. The rate of elongation and thickening of individual branches (shoots) varies across plant species. This variation is important for the outcome of competition and other plant-plant interactions. Here we compared rates of shoot growth across 44 species from tropical, warm temperate, and cool temperate forests of eastern Australia. 2. Shoot growth rate was found to correlate with a suite of traits including the potential height of the species, xylem-specific conductivity, leaf size, leaf area...

Data from: Colour patch size and measurement error using reflectance spectrometry

Arnaud Badiane, Guillem Pérez I De Lanuza, María Del Carmen García-Custodio, Pau Carazo & Enrique Font
1. Over the past twenty years, portable and relatively affordable spectrophotometers have greatly advanced the study of animal coloration. However, the small size of many colour patches poses methodological challenges that have not, to date, been assessed in the literature. Here, we tackle this issue for a reflectance spectrophotometry set-up widely used in ecology and evolution (the beam method). 2. We reviewed the literature on animal coloration reporting the use of reflectance spectrophotometry to explore...

Data from: Filters of floristic exchange: how traits and climate shape the rainforest invasion of Sahul from Sunda

Jia-Yee S. Yap, Maurizio Rossetto, Craig Costion, Darren Crayn, Robert M. Kooyman, James Richardson & Robert Henry
Aim To evaluate how biogeographic and ecological processes influenced species distributions and community assembly in a continental rainforest flora with mixed biogeographic origins. Location Continental Australia. Methods We identified 795 species with Sahul ancestry (Australian rainforest flora of Gondwanan origin) and 604 species with Sunda ancestry (rainforest plant lineages of Indo-Malesian origin) from a total of 1872 free-standing Australian woody rainforest taxa. We then compared the distribution of Sunda to Sahul species in relation to...

Data from: Abiotic and biotic predictors of macroecological patterns in bird and butterfly coloration

Rhiannon L. Dalrymple, Habacuc Flores-Moreno, Darrell J. Kemp, Thomas E. White, Shawn W. Laffan, Frank A. Hemmings, Timothy D. Hitchcock & Angela T. Moles
Animal color phenotypes are invariably influenced by both their biotic community and the abiotic environments. A host of hypotheses have been proposed for how variables such as solar radiation, habitat shadiness, primary productivity, temperature, rainfall and community diversity might affect animal color traits. However, while individual factors have been linked to coloration in specific contexts, little is known about which factors are most important across broad taxonomic and geographic scales. Using data collected from 570...

Data from: Water quality assessment of Australian ports using water quality evaluation indices

Sayka Jahan & Vladimir Strezov
Australian ports serve diverse and extensive activities, such as shipping, tourism and fisheries, which may all impact the quality of port water. In this work water quality monitoring at different ports using a range of water quality evaluation indices was applied to assess the port water quality. Seawater samples at 30 stations in the year 2016–2017 from six ports in NSW, Australia, namely Port Jackson, Botany, Kembla, Newcastle, Yamba and Eden, were investigated to determine...

Data from: Genetic structure and signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos)

Paolo Momigliano, Robert Harcourt, William D. Robbins, Vanessa Jaiteh, Gusti N. Mahardika, Andriuanus Sembiring & Adam Stow
With overfishing reducing the abundance of marine predators in multiple marine ecosystems, knowledge of genomic structure and local adaptation may provide valuable information to assist sustainable management. Despite recent technological advances, most studies on sharks have used small sets of neutral markers to describe their genetic structure. We used 5517 nuclear SNPs and a mtDNA gene to characterize patterns of genetic structure and detect signatures of selection in grey reef sharks (Carcharhinus amblyrhynchos). Using samples...

Data from: Correlated evolution between colouration and ambush site in predators with visual prey lures

Felipe Malheiros Gawryszewski, Miguel A. Calero-Torralbo, Rosemary G. Gillespie, Miguel Rodriguez-Girones & Marie E. Herberstein
The evolution of a visual signal will be affected by signaller and receiver behaviour, and by the physical properties of the environment where the signal is displayed. Crab spiders are typical sit-and-wait predators found in diverse ambush sites, such as tree bark, foliage and flowers. Some of the flower-dweller species present a UV+-white visual lure that makes them conspicuous and attractive to their prey. We hypothesised that UV+-white colouration was associated with the evolution of...

Data from: Temporal variability in the environmental and geographic predictors of spatial-recruitment in nearshore rockfishes

Russell W. Markel, Katie E. Lotterhos, Clifford L. K. Robinson, RW Markel, KE Lotterhos & CLK Robinson
Geography and habitat availability may be key drivers underlying spatial patterns of larval supply and recruitment success of nearshore marine fishes, but they are poorly understood. We assessed spatial recruitment patterns of nearshore young-of-the-year Pacific rockfishes Sebastes spp. in kelp forest and eelgrass meadow habitats from 2004 to 2014 on the west coast of Vancouver Island, British Columbia. Our sites varied in habitat area, wave exposure, sea surface temperature, and distance from the open coast....

Data from: Cooperative defence operates by social modulation of biogenic amine levels in the honeybee brain

Morgane Nouvian, Souvik Mandal, Charlène Jamme, Charles Claudianos, Patrizia D'Ettorre, Judith Reinhard, Andrew B. Barron & Martin Giurfa
The defence of a society often requires that some specialized members coordinate to repel a threat at personal risk. This is especially true for honeybee guards, which defend the hive and may sacrifice their lives upon stinging. Central to this cooperative defensive response is the sting alarm pheromone, which has isoamyl acetate (IAA) as its main component. Although this defensive behaviour has been well described, the neural mechanisms triggered by IAA to coordinate stinging have...

Data from: Measuring embryonic heart rate of wild birds: an opportunity to take the pulse on early development

Elizabeth L. Sheldon, Luke S. C. McCowan, Callum S. McDiarmid & Simon C. Griffith
Embryonic heart rate has the potential to provide great insight into physiological variation and ontogenic status in early development. The availability of a relatively inexpensive and portable piece of equipment – the Buddy egg monitor (Vetronic Services, UK), provides the opportunity to measure embryonic heart rate non-invasively in the field. Here we demonstrate the application of this equipment in the climatically harsh Australian outback. We characterize variation in embryonic heart rate in the zebra finch...

Data from: Scaling up flammability from individual leaves to fuel beds

Saskia Grootemaat, Ian Wright, Peter Van Bodegom, Johannes Cornelissen, Peter M. Van Bodegom, Ian J. Wright & Johannes H. C. Cornelissen
Wildfires play an important role in vegetation composition and structure, nutrient fluxes, human health and wealth, and are interlinked with climate change. Plants have an influence on wildfire behaviour and predicting this feedback is a high research priority. For upscaling from leaf traits to wildfire behaviour we need to know if the same leaf traits are important for the flammability of (i) individual leaves, and (ii) multiple leaves packed in fuel beds. Based on a...

Data from: The role of visual cues in mother–pup reunions in a colonially breeding mammal

Kaja Wierucka, Benjamin J. Pitcher, Robert Harcourt & Isabelle Charrier
Parental care is an important factor influencing offspring survival and adult reproductive success in many vertebrates. Parent-offspring recognition ensures care is only directed to filial young, avoiding the costs of misallocated resource transfer. It is essential in colonial mammal species, such as otariids (fur seals and sea lions), in which repeated mother-offspring separations increase the risk of misdirecting maternal effort. Identification of otariid pups by mothers is known to be multimodal, yet the role of...

Data from: Dynamic population codes of multiplexed stimulus features in primate area MT

Erin Goddard, Samuel G. Solomon & Thomas A. Carlson
The middle-temporal area (MT) of primate visual cortex is critical in the analysis of visual motion. Single-unit studies suggest that the response dynamics of neurons within area MT depend on stimulus features, but how these dynamics emerge at the population level, and how feature representations interact, is not clear. Here, we used multivariate classification analysis to study how stimulus features are represented in the spiking activity of populations of neurons in area MT of marmoset...

Data from: Fast-growing oysters show reduced capacity to provide a thermal refuge to intertidal biodiversity at high temperatures

Dominic McAfee, Wayne A. O'Connor & Melanie J. Bishop
1.Ecosystem engineers that modify the thermal environment experienced by associated organisms might assist in the climate change adaptation of species. This depends upon the ability of ecosystem engineers to persist and continue to ameliorate thermal stress under changing climatic conditions – traits that may display significant intraspecific variation. 2.In the physically stressful intertidal, the complex three-dimensional structure of oysters provides shading and traps moisture during aerial exposure at low tide. We assessed variation in the...

Data from: Cross-modal recognition of familiar conspecifics in goats

Benjamin J. Pitcher, Elodie F. Briefer, Luigi Baciadonna & Alan G. McElligott
When identifying other individuals, animals may match current cues with stored information about that individual from the same sensory modality. Animals may also be able to combine current information with previously acquired information from other sensory modalities, indicating that they possess complex cognitive templates of individuals that are independent of modality. We investigated whether goats (Capra hircus) possess cross-modal representations (auditory–visual) of conspecifics. We presented subjects with recorded conspecific calls broadcast equidistant between two individuals,...

Data from: Gut microbiota modifies olfactory-guided microbial preferences and foraging decisions in Drosophila

Adam Chun-Nin Wong, Qiao-Ping Wang, Juliano Morimoto, Alistair M. Senior, Mathieu Lihoreau, G. Gregory Neely, Stephen J. Simpson & Fleur Ponton
The gut microbiota affects a wide spectrum of host physiological traits, including development [ 1–5 ], germline [ 6 ], immunity [ 7–9 ], nutrition [ 4, 10, 11 ], and longevity [ 12, 13 ]. Association with microbes also influences fitness-related behaviors such as mating [ 14 ] and social interactions [ 15, 16 ]. Although the gut microbiota is evidently important for host wellbeing, how hosts become associated with particular assemblages of microbes...

Data from: Females drive asymmetrical introgression from rare to common species in Darwin's tree finches

Katharina J. Peters, Steven A. Myers, Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Jody A. O'Connor & Sonia Kleindorfer
The consequences of hybridization for biodiversity depend on the specific ecological and evolutionary context in which it occurs. Understanding patterns of gene flow among hybridizing species is crucial for determining the evolutionary trajectories of species assemblages. The recently discovered hybridization between two species of Darwin's tree finches (Camarhynchus parvulus and C. pauper) on Floreana Island, Galápagos, presents an exciting opportunity to investigate the mechanisms causing hybridization and its potential evolutionary consequences under conditions of recent...

Data from: Hierarchical influences of prey distribution on patterns of prey capture by a marine predator

Gemma Carroll, Martin Cox, Robert Harcourt, Benjamin J. Pitcher, David Slip & Ian Jonsen
1. Prey distribution acts at multiple spatial scales to influence foraging success by predators. The overall distribution of prey may shape foraging ranges, the distance between patches may influence the ability of predators to detect and move between profitable areas, and individual patch characteristics may affect prey capture efficiency. 2. In this study, we assessed relationship between spatially-explicit patterns of prey capture by a central place forager, the little penguin (using GPS tracking and accelerometry),...

Data from: Mapping and analysis of the connectome of sympathetic premotor neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla of the rat using a volumetric brain atlas

Bowen Dempsey, Sheng Le, Anita Turner, Phill Bokiniec, Radhika Ramadas, Jan G. Bjaalie, Clement Menuet, Rachael Neve, Andrew Allen, Ann Goodchild, Simon McMullan, Phil Bokiniec, Ann K. Goodchild & Andrew M. Allen
Spinally projecting neurons in the rostral ventrolateral medulla (RVLM) play a critical role in the generation of vasomotor sympathetic tone and are thought to receive convergent input from neurons at every level of the neuraxis; the factors that determine their ongoing activity remain unresolved. In this study we use a genetically restricted viral tracing strategy to definitively map their spatially diffuse connectome. We infected bulbospinal RVLM neurons with recombinant rabies variant that drives reporter expression...

Data from: A sex-linked supergene controls sperm morphology and swimming speed in a songbird

Kang-Wook Kim, Clair Bennison, Nicola Hemmings, Lola Brookes, Laura L. Hurley, Simon C. Griffith, Terry Burke, Tim R. Birkhead & Jon Slate
Sperm are perhaps the most diverse cells in the animal kingdom, with enormous morphological variation between taxa, between species, between males and within an ejaculate. Considerable interest in sperm diversity has arisen following the realisation that sperm competition (post-copulatory sexual selection) is a powerful selective force in many organisms, and that sperm morphology has co-evolved with female reproductive tract morphology. However, the relationship between sperm morphology, sperm motility and fertilisation success is only partially understood....

Data from: Making a queen: an epigenetic analysis of the robustness of the honey bee (Apis mellifera) queen developmental pathway

Xu Jiang He, Lin Bin Zhou, Qi Zhong Pan, Andrew B. Barron, Wei Yu Yan & Zhi Jiang Zeng
Specialized castes are considered a key reason for the evolutionary and ecological success of the social insect lifestyle. The most essential caste distinction is between the fertile queen and the sterile workers. Honeybee (Apis mellifera) workers and queens are not genetically distinct, rather these different phenotypes are the result of epigenetically regulated divergent developmental pathways. This is an important phenomenon in understanding the evolution of social insect societies. Here, we studied the genomic regulation of...

Data from: Do group dynamics affect colour morph clines during a range shift?

Lesley T. Lancaster, Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Bengt Hansson & Erik I. Svensson
Species exhibiting colour-polymorphism are thought to have an ecological advantage at the landscape scale, because spatial segregation of alternatively-adapted ecotypes into diverse habitats can increase the total species’ niche breadth and thus confer greater geographic range size. However, morph frequencies are also influenced by intra-populational processes such as frequency- or density-dependent social interactions. To identify how social feedback may affect clinal variation in morph frequencies, we investigated reciprocal interactions between morph-specific thermal tolerance, local climatic...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    32

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    32

Affiliations

  • Macquarie University
    32
  • University of Sydney
    4
  • University of Queensland
    3
  • University of Melbourne
    3
  • French National Centre for Scientific Research
    3
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    3
  • University of Adelaide
    2
  • Royal Botanic Gardens
    2
  • Lund University
    2
  • University of Florida
    2