39 Works

Data from: Honey bee (Apis mellifera) sociability and nestmate affiliation is dependent on the social environment experienced post-eclosion

Susie E. Hewlett, Deborah M. Wareham & Andrew B. Barron
Underpinning the formation of a social group is the motivation of individuals to aggregate and interact with conspecifics, termed sociability. Here we developed an assay, inspired by vertebrate approaches to evaluate social behaviours, to simultaneously examine the development of honey bee (Apis mellifera) sociability and nestmate affiliation. Focal bees were placed in a testing chamber, which was separated from groups of nestmates and conspecific non-nestmates by single-layer mesh screens. Assessing how much time bees spent...

FAIMS Project Preprints

Brian Ballsun-Stanton & Shawn Ross

Ballsun-Stanton Personal Paper Archive

Brian Ballsun-Stanton

Data from: Australian native mammals recognise and respond to alien predators: a meta-analysis

Peter B. Banks, Alexandra J. R. Carthey & Jenna P. Bytheway
Prey naiveté is a failure to recognise novel predators and thought to cause exaggerated impacts of alien predators on native wildlife. Yet there is equivocal evidence in the literature for native prey naiveté towards aliens. To address this, we conducted a meta-analysis of Australian mammal responses to native and alien predators. Australia has the world’s worst record of extinction and declines of native mammals, largely due to two alien predators introduced some 150 years ago:...

Data from: Calling in the heat: the zebra finch ‘incubation call’ depends on heat but not reproductive stage

Callum S. McDiarmid, Marc Naguib & Simon C. Griffith
Environmental conditions during early development can profoundly impact an organism’s phenotype, potentially resulting in future adaptations. Offspring can often obtain environmental information directly, but in some cases rely on parental cues or signals. It was recently suggested that at high ambient temperatures zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata) parents use acoustic signals (‘incubation calls’ or hereon ‘v-calls’) to adaptively alter offspring development for hot conditions. However, this conclusion requires a thorough understanding of the timing and production...

Data from: Combined use of eDNA metabarcoding and video surveillance for the assessment of fish biodiversity

Michael Stat, Jeffrey John, Joseph D. DiBattista, Stephen J. Newman, Michael Bunce & Euan S. Harvey
Monitoring communities of fish is important for the management and health of fisheries and marine ecosystems. Baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVs) are one of the most effective non‐destructive techniques for sampling bony fishes and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays, and skates). However, while BRUVs can sample visually conspicuous biota, some taxa are under‐sampled or not recorded at all. Here, we compared the diversity of fishes characterised using BRUVs with metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from...

Data from: Signatures of local adaptation along environmental gradients in a range-expanding damselfly (Ischnura elegans)

Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Chuan Ji Yong, Lesley T. Lancaster, Erik I. Svensson & Bengt Hansson
Insect distributions are shifting rapidly in response to climate change and are undergoing rapid evolutionary change. We investigate the molecular signatures underlying local adaptation in the range-expanding damselfly, Ischnura elegans. Using a landscape genomic approach combined with generalized dissimilarity modelling (GDM), we detect selection signatures on loci via allelic frequency change along environmental gradients. We analyse 13,612 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), derived from Restriction site-Associated DNA sequencing (RADseq), in 426 individuals from 25 sites spanning...

Data from: An androgenic endocrine disruptor alters male mating behaviour in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

Michael G. Bertram, Minna Saaristo, Tiarne E. Ecker, John B. Baumgartner, Bob B.M. Wong & Bob B M Wong
Hormonally active chemical pollution threatens human and wildlife populations globally. However, despite the well-established capacity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to alter reproductive traits, relatively few studies have examined the impacts of EDCs on mechanisms of sexual selection. This study investigated the effects of short-term exposure to an environmentally realistic level of 17β-trenbolone—a potent anabolic steroid used in livestock production worldwide—on male mate preference, reproductive behaviour and morphology in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Male guppies prefer...

YourShore

Elisa Bone, Petra Heřmánková, Adela Sobotkova, Brian Ballsun-Stanton, Shawn Ross & Penny Crook
Your Shore: Citizen science oyster monitoring program

Data from: Behavioural plasticity under a changing climate; how an experimental local climate affects the nest construction of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

Bridget L. Campbell, Laura L. Hurley & Simon C. Griffith
Successful reproduction in most avian species is dependent on the construction of a nest that provides protection and a suitable microclimate for the eggs and developing nestlings. Observational studies suggest that climatic variation may affect the structure of the nest, but to date there have been no attempts to experimentally determine the role that local climate plays in the construction of a suitable nest. Using a within-individual counter balanced design we investigated how nest composition...

Data from: Environmental DNA metabarcoding studies are critically affected by substrate selection

Adam Koziol, Michael Stat, Tiffany Simpson, Simon Jarman, Joseph D. DiBattista, Euan S. Harvey, Michael Marnane, Justin McDonald & Michael Bunce
Effective biomonitoring is critical for driving management outcomes that ensure long-term sustainability of the marine environment. In recent years environmental DNA (eDNA), coupled with metabarcoding methodologies, has emerged as a promising tool for generating biotic surveys of marine ecosystems, including those under anthropogenic pressure. However, more empirical data is needed on how to best implement eDNA field sampling approaches to maximise their utility for each specific application. The effect of the substrate chosen for eDNA...

Streamwatch

Gregory McDonald, Petra Heřmánková, Adela Sobotkova, Brian Ballsun-Stanton, Shawn Ross & Penny Crook
Water quality monitoring around Sydney, Streamwatch Project

Transparent data practice for reliable and reproducible research Workshop 2018-11-07

Shawn Ross, Fiona Jones, Jane Van Balen, Brian Ballsun-Stanton & Susan Shrubb
Workshop files and notes from the 2018 November 7 Workshop

Data from: Limits to species richness in terrestrial communities

John Alroy
Are communities limited by biotic interactions, or are they random draws from regional species pools? One way to tell is to compare total species counts in geographic regions to average counts in ecological samples falling within those regions. If species richness is limited regionally, then the relationship should be curvilinear even in a log-log space. Local data pertaining to trees and 10 groups of animals are analyzed to test this hypothesis. Most relationships are indeed...

Data from: Isolation rearing does not constrain social plasticity in a family-living lizard

Julia L. Riley, Côme Guidou, Caroline Fryns, Johann Mourier, Stephan T. Leu, Daniel W.A. Noble, Richard W. Byrne, Martin J. Whiting & Daniel W A Noble
An animal’s social environment can be both dynamic and complex. Thus, social species often garner fitness benefits through being plastic in their social behavior. Yet, social plasticity can be constrained by an individual’s experience. We examined the influence of early social environment on social behavior in the tree skink (Egernia striolata), a family-living lizard. In the first phase of this study, we reared juveniles in two different social environments for 1.5 years: either in isolation...

Data from: Experimental heatwaves negatively impact sperm quality in the zebra finch

Laura L. Hurley, Callum S. McDiarmid, Christopher R. Friesen, Simon C. Griffith & Melissah Rowe
For sexually reproducing species, functionally competent sperm are critical to reproduction. While high atmospheric temperatures are known to influence the timing of breeding, incubation and reproductive success in birds, the effect of temperature on sperm quality remains largely unexplored. Here, we experimentally investigated the impact of ecologically relevant extreme temperatures on cloacal temperature and sperm morphology and motility in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. We periodically sampled males exposed to 30°C or 40°C temperatures daily for...

Does variation in pre-natal heart rate, effect post-natal activity levels and growth rate in the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)?

elizabeth sheldon & Simon Griffith

Data from: Screening of candidate substrates and coupling ions of transporters by thermostability shift assays

Homa Majd, Martin S. King, Shane M. Palmer, Anthony C. Smith, Liam D. H. Elbourne, Ian T. Paulsen, David Sharples, Peter J. F. Henderson, Edmund R. S. Kunji, Peter JF Henderson, Liam DH Elbourne & Edmund RS Kunji
Substrates of most transport proteins have not been identified, limiting our understanding of their role in physiology and disease. Traditional identification methods use transport assays with radioactive compounds, but they are technically challenging and many compounds are unavailable in radioactive form or are prohibitively expensive, precluding large-scale trials. Here, we present a high-throughput screening method that can identify candidate substrates from libraries of unlabeled compounds. The assay is based on the principle that transport proteins...

Data from: Does prey encounter and nutrient content affect prey selection in wolf spiders inhabiting Bt cotton fields?

Dalila Rendon, Phillip W. Taylor, Shawn M. Wilder & Mary E.A. Whitehouse
Wolf spiders are abundant and voracious predators at the soil-plant interface in cotton crops. Among other prey, they attack late-instar larvae of the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa spp., an economically important pest. Consequently, wolf spiders in transgenic Bt cotton could provide significant biological control of Bt-resistant Helicoverpa larvae that descend to the soil to pupate. The predator-prey interactions between wolf spiders and Helicoverpa could, however, be constrained by the presence of alternative prey and intraguild predators....

Data from: Epigenetic and genetic variation among three separate introductions of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) into Australia

Elizabeth L. Sheldon, Aaron Schrey, Samuel C. Andrew, Alexandria Ragsdale & Simon C. Griffith
Invasive populations are often associated with low levels of genetic diversity due to population bottlenecks at the initial stages of invasion. Despite this, the ability of invasive species to adapt rapidly in response to novel environments is well documented. Epigenetic mechanisms have recently been proposed to facilitate the success of invasive species by compensating for reduced levels of genetic variation. Here, we use MS-AFLP and microsatellite analyses to compare levels of epigenetic and genetic diversity...

Data from: Mollusks from the upper Shackleton Limestone (Cambrian Series 2), Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica

Thomas M. Claybourn, Sarah M. Jacquet, Christian B. Skovsted, Timothy P. Topper, Lars E. Holmer & Glenn A. Brock
An assemblage of Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3–4 conchiferan mollusks from the Shackleton Limestone, Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica is formally described and illustrated. The fauna includes one bivalve, one macromollusk and ten micromollusks, including the first description of the species Xinjispira simplex outside North China. The new fauna shows some similarity to previously described micromollusks from lower Cambrian glacial erratics from the Antarctic Peninsula. The fauna, mainly composed of steinkerns, is relatively low diversity, but...

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: Biogenic amine modulation of honey bee sociability and nestmate affiliation

Susie E. Hewlett, Jacqueline D. Delahunt Smoleniec, Deborah M. Wareham, Thomas M. Pyne & Andrew B. Barron
Biogenic amines modulate a range of social behaviours, including sociability and mechanisms of group cohesion, in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we tested if the biogenic amines modulate honey bee (Apis mellifera) sociability and nestmate affiliation. We examined the consequences of treatments with biogenic amines, agonists and antagonists on a bee's approach to, and subsequent social interactions with, conspecifics in both naturally hive-reared bees and isolated bees. We used two different treatment methods. Bees were...

A systematic review comparing physiological, perceptual and performance measures between treadmill and overground running

Jayme Miller, Bas Van Hooren, Chris Bishop, Jonathan Buckley, Richard Willy & Joel Fuller
Motorised treadmills are commonly used by researchers, clinicians and athletes to simulate overground running for a variety of different health-related purposes (e.g. exercise tolerance testing, rehabilitation from injury, and athlete training). Treadmill running is advantageous in research and clinical situations as it offers a convenient means of investigating continuous running activity, while allowing consistent control of environmental elements such as surface gradient, running velocity and ambient temperature. However, since running is typically performed overground in...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    39

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29
  • Text
    10

Affiliations

  • Macquarie University
    39
  • Curtin University
    3
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2
  • Australian Museum
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • Newport (United States)
    1