29 Works

Data from: Combined use of eDNA metabarcoding and video surveillance for the assessment of fish biodiversity

Michael Stat, Jeffrey John, Joseph D. DiBattista, Stephen J. Newman, Michael Bunce & Euan S. Harvey
Monitoring communities of fish is important for the management and health of fisheries and marine ecosystems. Baited remote underwater video systems (BRUVs) are one of the most effective non‐destructive techniques for sampling bony fishes and elasmobranchs (sharks, rays, and skates). However, while BRUVs can sample visually conspicuous biota, some taxa are under‐sampled or not recorded at all. Here, we compared the diversity of fishes characterised using BRUVs with metabarcoding of environmental DNA (eDNA) extracted from...

Data from: Signatures of local adaptation along environmental gradients in a range-expanding damselfly (Ischnura elegans)

Rachael Y. Dudaniec, Chuan Ji Yong, Lesley T. Lancaster, Erik I. Svensson & Bengt Hansson
Insect distributions are shifting rapidly in response to climate change and are undergoing rapid evolutionary change. We investigate the molecular signatures underlying local adaptation in the range-expanding damselfly, Ischnura elegans. Using a landscape genomic approach combined with generalized dissimilarity modelling (GDM), we detect selection signatures on loci via allelic frequency change along environmental gradients. We analyse 13,612 Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs), derived from Restriction site-Associated DNA sequencing (RADseq), in 426 individuals from 25 sites spanning...

Data from: An androgenic endocrine disruptor alters male mating behaviour in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata)

Michael G. Bertram, Minna Saaristo, Tiarne E. Ecker, John B. Baumgartner, Bob B.M. Wong & Bob B M Wong
Hormonally active chemical pollution threatens human and wildlife populations globally. However, despite the well-established capacity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals (EDCs) to alter reproductive traits, relatively few studies have examined the impacts of EDCs on mechanisms of sexual selection. This study investigated the effects of short-term exposure to an environmentally realistic level of 17β-trenbolone—a potent anabolic steroid used in livestock production worldwide—on male mate preference, reproductive behaviour and morphology in the guppy (Poecilia reticulata). Male guppies prefer...

Data from: Limits to species richness in terrestrial communities

John Alroy
Are communities limited by biotic interactions, or are they random draws from regional species pools? One way to tell is to compare total species counts in geographic regions to average counts in ecological samples falling within those regions. If species richness is limited regionally, then the relationship should be curvilinear even in a log-log space. Local data pertaining to trees and 10 groups of animals are analyzed to test this hypothesis. Most relationships are indeed...

Data from: Environmental DNA metabarcoding studies are critically affected by substrate selection

Adam Koziol, Michael Stat, Tiffany Simpson, Simon Jarman, Joseph D. DiBattista, Euan S. Harvey, Michael Marnane, Justin McDonald & Michael Bunce
Effective biomonitoring is critical for driving management outcomes that ensure long-term sustainability of the marine environment. In recent years environmental DNA (eDNA), coupled with metabarcoding methodologies, has emerged as a promising tool for generating biotic surveys of marine ecosystems, including those under anthropogenic pressure. However, more empirical data is needed on how to best implement eDNA field sampling approaches to maximise their utility for each specific application. The effect of the substrate chosen for eDNA...

Data from: Behavioural plasticity under a changing climate; how an experimental local climate affects the nest construction of the zebra finch (Taeniopygia guttata)

Bridget L. Campbell, Laura L. Hurley & Simon C. Griffith
Successful reproduction in most avian species is dependent on the construction of a nest that provides protection and a suitable microclimate for the eggs and developing nestlings. Observational studies suggest that climatic variation may affect the structure of the nest, but to date there have been no attempts to experimentally determine the role that local climate plays in the construction of a suitable nest. Using a within-individual counter balanced design we investigated how nest composition...

Data from: Biogenic amine modulation of honey bee sociability and nestmate affiliation

Susie E. Hewlett, Jacqueline D. Delahunt Smoleniec, Deborah M. Wareham, Thomas M. Pyne & Andrew B. Barron
Biogenic amines modulate a range of social behaviours, including sociability and mechanisms of group cohesion, in both vertebrates and invertebrates. Here, we tested if the biogenic amines modulate honey bee (Apis mellifera) sociability and nestmate affiliation. We examined the consequences of treatments with biogenic amines, agonists and antagonists on a bee's approach to, and subsequent social interactions with, conspecifics in both naturally hive-reared bees and isolated bees. We used two different treatment methods. Bees were...

Data from: Epigenetic and genetic variation among three separate introductions of the house sparrow (Passer domesticus) into Australia

Elizabeth L. Sheldon, Aaron Schrey, Samuel C. Andrew, Alexandria Ragsdale & Simon C. Griffith
Invasive populations are often associated with low levels of genetic diversity due to population bottlenecks at the initial stages of invasion. Despite this, the ability of invasive species to adapt rapidly in response to novel environments is well documented. Epigenetic mechanisms have recently been proposed to facilitate the success of invasive species by compensating for reduced levels of genetic variation. Here, we use MS-AFLP and microsatellite analyses to compare levels of epigenetic and genetic diversity...

Data from: Does prey encounter and nutrient content affect prey selection in wolf spiders inhabiting Bt cotton fields?

Dalila Rendon, Phillip W. Taylor, Shawn M. Wilder & Mary E.A. Whitehouse
Wolf spiders are abundant and voracious predators at the soil-plant interface in cotton crops. Among other prey, they attack late-instar larvae of the cotton bollworm Helicoverpa spp., an economically important pest. Consequently, wolf spiders in transgenic Bt cotton could provide significant biological control of Bt-resistant Helicoverpa larvae that descend to the soil to pupate. The predator-prey interactions between wolf spiders and Helicoverpa could, however, be constrained by the presence of alternative prey and intraguild predators....

Data from: Comparative population genomics reveals key barriers to dispersal in Southern Ocean penguins

Gemma V. Clucas, Jane L. Younger, Damian Kao, Louise Emmerson, Colin Southwell, Barbara Wienecke, Alex D. Rogers, Charles-Andre Bost, Gary D. Miller, Michael J. Polito, Patrick Lelliot, Jonathan Handley, Sarah Crofts, Richard A. Phillips, Michael J. Dunn, Karen J. Miller, Tom Hart & Patrick Lelliott
The mechanisms that determine patterns of species dispersal are important factors in the production and maintenance of biodiversity. Understanding these mechanisms helps to forecast the responses of species to environmental change. Here we used a comparative framework and genome-wide data obtained through RAD-seq to compare the patterns of connectivity among breeding colonies for five penguin species with shared ancestry, overlapping distributions, and differing ecological niches, allowing an examination of the intrinsic and extrinsic barriers governing...

Data from: Structural traits dictate abiotic stress amelioration by intertidal oysters

Dominic McAfee, Melanie J. Bishop, Tai-Nga Yu & Gray A. Williams
1.Autogenic ecosystem engineers often provide cool microhabitats which are used by associated organisms to reduce thermal extremes. The value of such habitats is, however, dependant on key structural traits of the ecosystem engineer, and the intensity and duration of thermal exposure. 2.Using an experimental mesocosm that mimicked the rocky intertidal environment, we assessed how the spatial configuration of the habitat formed by an autogenic ecosystem engineer, the oyster, influences its capacity to mitigate heat stress...

Data from: Experimental heatwaves negatively impact sperm quality in the zebra finch

Laura L. Hurley, Callum S. McDiarmid, Christopher R. Friesen, Simon C. Griffith & Melissah Rowe
For sexually reproducing species, functionally competent sperm are critical to reproduction. While high atmospheric temperatures are known to influence the timing of breeding, incubation and reproductive success in birds, the effect of temperature on sperm quality remains largely unexplored. Here, we experimentally investigated the impact of ecologically relevant extreme temperatures on cloacal temperature and sperm morphology and motility in zebra finches Taeniopygia guttata. We periodically sampled males exposed to 30°C or 40°C temperatures daily for...

Data from: Isolation rearing does not constrain social plasticity in a family-living lizard

Julia L. Riley, Côme Guidou, Caroline Fryns, Johann Mourier, Stephan T. Leu, Daniel W.A. Noble, Richard W. Byrne, Martin J. Whiting & Daniel W A Noble
An animal’s social environment can be both dynamic and complex. Thus, social species often garner fitness benefits through being plastic in their social behavior. Yet, social plasticity can be constrained by an individual’s experience. We examined the influence of early social environment on social behavior in the tree skink (Egernia striolata), a family-living lizard. In the first phase of this study, we reared juveniles in two different social environments for 1.5 years: either in isolation...

Data from: Screening of candidate substrates and coupling ions of transporters by thermostability shift assays

Homa Majd, Martin S. King, Shane M. Palmer, Anthony C. Smith, Liam D. H. Elbourne, Ian T. Paulsen, David Sharples, Peter J. F. Henderson, Edmund R. S. Kunji, Peter JF Henderson, Liam DH Elbourne & Edmund RS Kunji
Substrates of most transport proteins have not been identified, limiting our understanding of their role in physiology and disease. Traditional identification methods use transport assays with radioactive compounds, but they are technically challenging and many compounds are unavailable in radioactive form or are prohibitively expensive, precluding large-scale trials. Here, we present a high-throughput screening method that can identify candidate substrates from libraries of unlabeled compounds. The assay is based on the principle that transport proteins...

Data from: Mollusks from the upper Shackleton Limestone (Cambrian Series 2), Central Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica

Thomas M. Claybourn, Sarah M. Jacquet, Christian B. Skovsted, Timothy P. Topper, Lars E. Holmer & Glenn A. Brock
An assemblage of Cambrian Series 2, Stages 3–4 conchiferan mollusks from the Shackleton Limestone, Transantarctic Mountains, East Antarctica is formally described and illustrated. The fauna includes one bivalve, one macromollusk and ten micromollusks, including the first description of the species Xinjispira simplex outside North China. The new fauna shows some similarity to previously described micromollusks from lower Cambrian glacial erratics from the Antarctic Peninsula. The fauna, mainly composed of steinkerns, is relatively low diversity, but...

Data from: Moving like a model: mimicry of hymenopteran flight trajectories by clearwing moths of Southeast Asian rainforests

Marta A. Skowron Volponi, Donald James McLean, Paolo Volponi & Robert Dudley
Clearwing moths are known for their physical resemblance to hymenopterans, but the extent of their behavioural mimicry is unknown. We describe zigzag flights of sesiid bee mimics which are nearly indistinguishable from those of sympatric bees, whereas sesiid wasp mimics display faster, straighter flights more akin to those of wasps. In particular, the flight of the sesiids Heterosphecia pahangensis, Aschistophleps argentifasciata and Pyrophleps cruentata resembles both Tetragonilla collina and T. atripes stingless bees and, to...

Data from: The search for loci under selection: trends, biases and progress

Collin W. Ahrens, Paul D. Rymer, Adam Stow, Jason Bragg, Shannon Dillon, Kate D. L. Umbers & Rachael Y. Dudaniec
Detecting genetic variants under selection using FST outlier analysis (OA) and environmental association analyses (EAA) are popular approaches that provide insight into the genetic basis of local adaptation. Despite the frequent use of OA and EAA approaches and their increasing attractiveness for detecting signatures of selection, their application to field-based empirical data have not been synthesized. Here, we review 66 empirical studies that use Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) in OA and EAA. We report trends...

Data from: Predictable adaptive trajectories of sexual coloration in the wild: evidence from replicate experimental guppy populations

Darrell J. Kemp, Frana Batistic, David N. Reznick & Frana-Katica Batistic
The question of whether populations evolve predictably and consistently under similar selective regimes is fundamental to understanding how adaptation proceeds in the wild. We address this question with a replicated evolution experiment focused upon male sexual coloration in guppies (Poecilia reticulata). Fish were transplanted from a single high predation population in the Guanapo River to four replicate, guppy‐free low predation headwater streams. Two streams had their canopies thinned to adjust the setting under which male...

Data from: Incorporating non-equilibrium dynamics into demographic history inferences of a migratory marine species

Emma L. Carroll, Rachael Alderman, John L. Bannister, Martine Bérubé, Peter B. Best, Laura Boren, C. Scott Baker, Rochelle Constantine, Ken Findlay, Robert Harcourt, Louisiane Lemaire, Per J. Palsbøll, Nathalie J. Patenaude, Victoria J. Rowntree, Jon Seger, Debbie Steel, Luciano O. Valenzuela, Mandy Watson & Oscar E. Gaggiotti
Understanding how dispersal and gene flow link geographically separated populations over evolutionary history is challenging, particularly in migratory marine species. In southern right whales (SRWs, Eubalaena australis), patterns of genetic diversity are likely influenced by the glacial climate cycle and recent history of whaling. Here we use a dataset of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) sequences (n=1,327) and nuclear markers (17 microsatellite loci, n=222) from major wintering grounds to investigate circumpolar population structure, historical demography, and effective...

Data from: Subsistence practices, past biodiversity, and anthropogenic impacts revealed by New Zealand-wide ancient DNA survey

Frederik V. Seersholm, Theresa L. Cole, Alicia Grealy, Nicolas J. Rawlence, Karen Greig, Michael Knapp, Michael Stat, Anders J. Hansen, Luke J. Easton, Lara Shepherd, Alan J. D. Tennyson, R. Paul Scofield, Richard Walter & Michael Bunce
New Zealand’s geographic isolation, lack of native terrestrial mammals, and Gondwanan origins make it an ideal location to study evolutionary processes. However, since the archipelago was first settled by humans (c. 1280 AD), its unique biodiversity has been under pressure, and today an estimated 49% of the terrestrial avifauna is extinct. Current efforts to conserve the remaining fauna rely on a better understanding of the composition of past ecosystems, as well as the causes and...

Data from: Recent prey capture experience and dynamic habitat quality mediate short-term foraging site fidelity in a seabird

Gemma Carroll, Robert Harcourt, Benjamin J. Pitcher, David Slip & Ian Jonsen
Foraging site fidelity allows animals to increase their efficiency by returning to profitable feeding areas. However, the mechanisms underpinning why animals “stay” or “switch” sites have rarely been investigated. Here we explore how habitat quality and prior prey capture experience influence short-term site fidelity by the little penguin (Eudyptula minor). Using 88 consecutive foraging trips by 20 brooding penguins, we found that site fidelity was higher after foraging trips where environmental conditions were favourable, and...

Data from: Eyes wide shut: the impact of dim-light vision on neural investment in marine teleosts

Teresa L. Iglesias, Alex Dornburg, Dan L. Warren, Peter C. Wainwright, Lars Schmitz & Evan P. Economo
Understanding how organismal design evolves in response to environmental challenges is a central goal of evolutionary biology. In particular, assessing the extent to which environmental requirements drive general design features among distantly related groups is a major research question. The visual system is a critical sensory apparatus that evolves in response to changing light regimes. In vertebrates, the optic tectum is the primary visual processing center of the brain, and yet it is unclear how,...

Data from: Nest size is predicted by female identity and the local environment in the blue tit, but is not related to genetic or foster mother's nest size

Louis G. O'Neill, Timothy H. Parker & Simon C. Griffith
The potential for animals to respond to changing climates has sparked interest in intraspecific variation in avian nest structure since this may influence nest microclimate and protect eggs and offspring from inclement weather. However, there have been relatively few large-scale attempts to examine variation in nests or the determinates of individual variation in nest structure within populations. Using a set of mostly pre-registered analyses, we studied potential predictors of variation in the size of a...

Data from: Claw morphometrics in monitor lizards: variable substrate and habitat use correlate to shape diversity within a predator guild

Domenic C. D'Amore, Simon Clulow, J. Sean Doody, David Rhind & Colin R. McHenry
Numerous studies investigate morphology in the context of habitat, and lizards have received particular attention. Substrate usage is often reflected in the morphology of characters associated with locomotion, and, as a result, claws have become well‐studied ecomorphological traits linking the two. The Kimberley predator guild of Western Australia consists of 10 sympatric varanid species. The purpose of this study was to quantify claw size and shape in the guild using geometric morphometrics, and determine whether...

Data from: Social and nutritional factors shape larval aggregation, foraging, and body mass in a polyphagous fly

Juliano Morimoto, Binh Nguyen, Shabnam Tarahi Tabrizi, Fleur Ponton & Phillip Taylor
The majority of insect species have a clearly defined larval stage during development. Larval nutrition is crucial for individuals’ growth and development, and larval foraging success often depends on both resource availability and competition for those resources. To date, however, little is known about how these factors interact to shape larval development and behaviour. Here we manipulated the density of larvae of the polyphagous fruit fly pest Bactrocera tryoni (‘Queensland fruit fly’), and the diet...

Registration Year

  • 2018
    29

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    29

Affiliations

  • Macquarie University
    29
  • Curtin University
    3
  • Department of Primary Industries, Parks, Water and Environment
    2
  • Monash University
    2
  • University of St Andrews
    2
  • Australian Museum
    2
  • University of Sydney
    2
  • Commonwealth Scientific and Industrial Research Organisation
    2
  • University of Western Australia
    2
  • Newport (United States)
    1