3 Works

Data from: Tiny niches and translocations: the challenge of identifying suitable recipient sites for small and immobile species

Rob W. Brooker, Mark J. Brewer, Andrea J. Britton, Antonia Eastwood, Christopher Ellis, Alessandro Gimona, Laura Poggio & David R. Genney
Assisted colonisation, one form of species translocation, has been proposed as a tool for helping species to track suitable conditions in a changing climate. There are considerable practical challenges associated with it, including predicting where to place translocated individuals. This problem may be particularly big for small and immobile species, where small-scale micro-environmental conditions de-couple them from environmental conditions as projected in large-scale climate models. To investigate this problem we developed a survey-based model to...

Data from: Understorey plant community composition reflects invasion history decades after invasive Rhododendron has been removed

Janet E. Maclean, Ruth J. Mitchell, David F.R.P. Burslem, David Genney, Jeanette Hall, Robin J. Pakeman & David F. R. P. Burslem
1) A growing awareness of the destructive effects of non-native invasive species has led to a massive increase in removal programmes around the world. Little is typically known about what happens to sites following the removal of the invasives, however, and the implicit assumption that the native community will return, unaided, to pre-invasion conditions is often left untested. 2) We assessed recovery of the native understorey plant community following removal of the non-native invasive Rhododendron...

Data from: Attributing changes in the distribution of species abundance to weather variables using the example of British breeding birds

Cornelia S. Oedekoven, David A. Elston, Philip J. Harrison, Mark J. Brewer, Steve T. Buckland, Alison Johnston, Simon Foster, James W. Pearce-Higgins & Stephen T. Buckland
1. Modelling spatio-temporal changes in species abundance and attributing those changes to potential drivers such as climate, is an important but difficult problem. The standard approach for incorporating climatic variables into such models is to include each weather variable as a single covariate whose effect is expressed through a low-order polynomial or smoother in an additive model. This, however, confounds the spatial and temporal effects of the covariates. 2. We developed a novel approach to...

Registration Year

  • 2017
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    3

Affiliations

  • Scottish Natural Heritage
    3
  • James Hutton Institute
    2
  • University of Aberdeen
    1
  • University of St Andrews
    1
  • Royal Botanic Garden Edinburgh
    1
  • British Trust for Ornithology
    1