217 Works

Supplementary data to “Alternative reproductive tactics are associated with sperm performance in invasive round goby from two different salinity environments”

Leon Green, Jan Niemax, Jens‐Peter Herrmann, Axel Temming & Charlotta Kvarnemo
During male-male competition, evolution can favor alternative reproductive tactics. This often results in a dominant morph that holds a resource, such as a nest for egg laying, competes with a smaller sneaker morph that reproduces by stealing fertilizations. The salinity environment can influence male growth rates, e.g. via osmoregulatory costs, which in turn may influence the use of sneaker tactics for small males competing for mating opportunities. Salinity can also affect sperm directly; however, little...

Data from: Annual and perennial Medicago show signatures of parallel adaptation to climate and soil in highly conserved genes

José Luis Blanco-Pastor, Isabel María Liberal, Muhammet Sakiroglu, Yanling Wei, E. Charles Brummer, Rose L. Andrew & Bernard E. Pfeil
Human induced environmental change may require rapid adaptation of plant populations and crops, but the genomic basis of environmental adaptation remain poorly understood. We analyzed polymorphic loci from the perennial crop Medicago sativa (alfalfa or lucerne) and the annual legume model species M. truncatula to search for a common set of candidate genes that might contribute to adaptation to abiotic stress in both annual and perennial Medicago species. We identified a set of candidate genes...

Inversions and genomic differentiation after secondary contact: when drift contributes to maintenance, not loss, of differentiation

Marina Rafajlovic, Jordi Rambla, Jeffrey L. Feder, Arcadi Navarro & Rui Faria
Due to their effects on reducing recombination, chromosomal inversions may play an important role in speciation by establishing and/or maintaining linked blocks of genes causing reproductive isolation (RI) between populations. This view fits empirical data indicating that inversions typically harbour loci involved in RI. However, previous computer simulations of infinite populations with 2-4 loci involved in RI implied that, even with gene flux as low as 10^(-8) per gamete, per generation between alternative arrangements, inversions...

Temporally-balanced selection during development of larval Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) inherently preserves genetic diversity within offspring

Evan Durland, Pierre De Wit & Chris Langdon
Balancing selection is one of the mechanisms which has been proposed to explain the maintenance of genetic diversity in species across generations. For species with large populations and complex life histories, however, heterogeneous selection pressures may create a scenario in which the net effects of selection are balanced across developmental stages. With replicated cultures and a pooled sequencing approach, we show that genotype-dependent mortality in larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is largely temporally...

Data from: Genetic variation for adaptive traits is associated with polymorphic inversions in Littorina saxatilis

Eva Koch, Hernán Morales, Jenny Larsson, Anja Westram, Rui Faria, Alan Lemmon, Emily Lemmon, Kerstin Johannesson & Roger Butlin
Chromosomal inversion polymorphisms, segments of chromosomes that are flipped in orientation and occur in reversed order in some individuals, have long been recognized to play an important role in local adaptation. They can reduce recombination in heterozygous individuals and thus help to maintain sets of locally adapted alleles. In a wide range of organisms, populations adapted to different habitats differ in frequency of inversion arrangements. However, getting a full understanding of the importance of inversions...

Data from: Coronary blood flow influences tolerance to environmental extremes in fish

Daniel Morgenroth
Approximately half of all fishes have, in addition to the luminal venous O2 supply, a coronary circulation supplying the heart with fully oxygenated blood. Yet, it is not fully understood how coronary O2 delivery affects tolerance to environmental extremes such as warming and hypoxia. Hypoxia reduces arterial oxygenation, while warming increases overall tissue O2 demand. Thus, as both stressors are associated with reduced venous O2 supply to the heart, we hypothesised that coronary flow benefits...

CarniDIET 1.0: A database of terrestrial, carnivorous mammal diets

Owen Middleton, Hanna Svensson, Jorn Scharlemann, Soren Faurby & Chris Sandom
Motivation: A species’ diet is central to understanding many aspects of its biology, including its behaviour, movement, and ecological niche. The diets of terrestrial carnivorous mammals, defined here as species primarily consuming other mammals (hereafter, mammal-consumers), have been extensively studied and can vary in the proportion of different food types, and species, consumed across their geographic ranges. Accessibility to data capturing such variation in diets of mammal-consumers across the variety of ecosystems they occur in...

Intra-specific variation in metal tolerance modulate competition between two marine diatoms

Björn Andersson
This project contains data for the manuscript Intra-specific variation in metal tolerance modulate competition between two marine diatoms. The experiments tests how different toxic concentrations of heavy metals modulates competition between an artificially assembled community of Baltic Sea diatoms (four clonal strains each of the two diatom species Skeletonema marinoi (SM) and Thalassiosira baltica (TB). Briefly we use toxic Dose Response curves (DRC) to model how inter and intra specific selection between strains is expected...

Ancestral sperm ecotypes reveal multiple invasions of a non-native fish in northern Europe

Leon Green, Apostolos Apostolou, Ellika Faust, Kajsa Palmqvist, Jane W. Behrens, Jonathan N. Havenhand, Erica H. Leder & Charlotta Kvarnemo
For externally fertilising organisms in the aquatic environment, the abiotic fertilisation medium can be a strong selecting force. Among bony fishes, sperm are adapted to function in a narrow salinity range. A notable exception is the family Gobiidae, where several species reproduce across a wide salinity range. The family also contains several wide-spread invasive species. To better understand how these fishes tolerate such varying conditions, we measured sperm performance in relation to salinity from a...

CarniFOSS: A database of the body mass of fossil carnivores

Søren Faurby
Motivation: Body mass is one of the most important determinants of animal ecology. Unlike other important traits it is also readily inferable from fossils and it is therefore one of the only traits that can be directly analyzed and compared between fossil and contemporary communities. Despite this, no comprehensive database of the body mass of larger clades of extinct species exists. Analysis of fossils has therefore been restricted to small clades or to smaller, potentially...

Mercury accumulation in leaves of different plant types – the significance of tissue age and specific leaf area

Håkan Pleijel, Jenny Klingberg, Michelle Nerentorp, Malin Broberg, Brigitte Nyirambangutse, John Munthe, Göran Wallin & Malin C. Broberg
Mercury, Hg, is one of the most problematic metals from an environmental perspective. To assess the problems caused by Hg in the environment it is crucial to understand the processes of Hg biogeochemistry, but the exchange of Hg between the atmosphere and vegetation is not sufficiently well characterised. We explored the mercury concentration, [Hg], in foliage from a diverse set of plant types, locations and sampling periods to study whether there is a continuous accumulation...

Precipitation-catchment aquatic C emissions

Sivakiruthika Natchimuthu, Markus B. Wallin, Leif Klemedtsson, Patrick Crill & David Bastviken

Foreword

Monica Djerf-Pierre & Maria Edström

Comparing gender and media equality across the globe

Djerf-Pierre Monika & Edström Maria

Covid-19 och de nordiska nyhetsmedierna

Jonas Ohlsson, Mark Blach-Ørsten & Ida Willig

Mediebarometern 2020

Jonas Ohlsson

Mapping Africa’s biodiversity: more of the same is just not good enough

Harith Farooq, Josué Azevedo, Amadeu Soares, Alexandre Antonelli & Søren Faurby
Species distribution data are fundamental to the understanding of biodiversity patterns and processes. Yet, such data are strongly affected by sampling biases, mostly related to site accessibility. The understanding of these biases is therefore crucial in systematics, biogeography and conservation. Here we present a novel approach for quantifying sampling effort and its impact on biodiversity knowledge, focusing on Africa. In contrast to previous studies assessing sampling completeness (percentage of species recorded in relation to predicted),...

The code used to simulate range expansion in \"The effect of the recombination rate between adaptive loci on the capacity of a population to expand its range\"

Martin Eriksson & Marina Rafajlović
Previous theoretical work on range expansions over heterogeneous environments showed that there is a critical environmental gradient where range expansion stops. For populations with freely recombining loci underlying the trait under selection (hereafter adaptive loci), the critical gradient in one-dimensional habitats depends on the fitness cost of dispersal, and the strength of selection relative to genetic drift. Here, we extend the previous work in two directions and ask: What is the role of the recombination...

A molecular phylogeny of historical and contemporary specimens of an under-studied micro-invertebrate group

Russell Orr, Maja Sannum, Sanne Boessenkool, Emanuela Di Martino, Dennis Gordon, Hannah Mello, Matthias Obst, Mali Ramsfjell, Abigail Smith & Lee-Hsiang Liow
Resolution of relationships at lower taxonomic levels is crucial for answering many evolutionary questions, and as such, sufficiently varied species representation is vital. This latter goal is not always achievable with relatively fresh samples. To alleviate the difficulties in procuring rarer taxa, we have seen increasing utilization of historical specimens in building molecular phylogenies using high throughput sequencing. This effort, however, has mainly focused on large-bodied or well-studied groups, with small-bodied and under-studied taxa under-prioritized....

Data from: Animal models to understand the etiology and pathophysiology in polycystic ovary syndrome

Elisabet Stener-Victorin, Vasantha Padmanabhan, Kirsty A Walters, Rebecca E Campbell, Anna Benrick, Paolo Giacobini, Daniel A Dumesic & David H Abbott
More than one out of ten women worldwide are diagnosed with the leading cause of female reproductive and metabolic dysfunction, polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS). Despite its high prevalence, PCOS and its accompanying morbidities are likely under-diagnosed, averaging >2 years and 3 physicians changes before women are diagnosed. Despite intensive research, the underlying cause(s) of PCOS have yet to be defined. In order to understand PCOS pathophysiology, its developmental origins, and how to predict and prevent...

Biological traits of seabirds predict extinction risk and vulnerability to anthropogenic threats

Cerren Richards, Robert Cooke & Amanda Bates
Aim Seabirds are heavily threatened by anthropogenic activities and their conservation status is deteriorating rapidly. Yet, these pressures are unlikely to uniformly impact all species. It remains an open question if seabirds with similar ecological roles are responding similarly to human pressures. Here we aim to: 1) test whether threatened vs non-threatened seabirds are separated in trait space; 2) quantify the similarity of species’ roles (redundancy) per IUCN Red List Category; and 3) identify traits...

Data from: Sperm performance limits the reproduction of an invasive fish in novel salinities

Leon Green, Jan Niemax, Jens-Peter Herrmann, Axel Temming, Jane W. Behrens, Jonathan N. Havenhand, Erica Leder & Charlotta Kvarnemo
Aim: The few fish species able to reproduce across wide osmotic ranges either plastically acclimate sperm performance to, or are locally adapted to, different salinities. The invasive round goby (Neogobius melanostomus) is spreading in Eurasia and the Americas, into both fresh and brackish water. We aim to understand if reproduction in different salinities is affected an ability to acclimate. Location: Brackish and freshwater systems of northern Europe and the Baltic Sea. Methods: We cross-exposed round...

Datasets for: Genome wide analysis reveals genetic divergence between Goldsinny wrasse populations

Eeva Jansson, Francois Besnier, Ketil Malde, Carl André, Geir Dahle & Kevin A. Glover
Background: Marine fish populations are often characterized by high levels of gene flow and correspondingly low genetic divergence. This presents a challenge to define management units. Goldsinny wrasse (Ctenolabrus rupestris) is a heavily exploited species due to its importance as a cleaner-fish in commercial salmonid aquaculture. However, at the present, the population genetic structure of this species is still largely unresolved. Here, full-genome sequencing was used to produce the first genomic reference for this species,...

Direct observation of hyperpolarization breaking through the spin diffusion barrier

Quentin Stern, Samuel F. Cousin, Frederic Mentink-Vigier, Arthur C. Pinon, Stuart J. Elliott, Olivier Cala & Sami Jannin
Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) is a widely used tool for overcoming the low intrinsic sensitivity of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy and imaging. Its practical applicability is typically bounded, however, by the so-called ‘spin diffusion barrier’, which relates to the poor efficiency of polarization transfer from highly polarized nuclei close to paramagnetic centers to bulk nuclei. A quantitative assessment of this barrier has been hindered so far by the lack of general methods for studying nuclear-polarization...

Home range use in the West Australian seahorse Hippocampus subelongatus is influenced by sex and partner’s home range but not by body size or paired status

Charlotta Kvarnemo, Susanne E. Andersson, Jonas Elisson, Glenn I. Moore & Adam G. Jones
These data and scripts form the basis for Kvarnemo C, Andersson SE, Elisson J, Moore GI and Jones AG (2021). Home range use in the West Australian seahorse Hippocampus subelongatus is influenced by sex and partner's home range but not by body size or paired status. Journal of Ethology 39: 235–248. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10164-021-00698-y. The abstract below is from this paper: Genetic monogamy is the rule for many species of seahorse, including the West Australian seahorse Hippocampus...

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