251 Works

Prenatal androgen exposure and transgenerational susceptibility to polycystic ovary syndrome

Elisabet Stener-Victorin, Sanjiv Risal, Yu Pei, Haojiang Lu, Maria Manti, Romina Fornes, Han-Pin Pui, Zhiyi Zhao, Julie Massart, Claes Ohlsson, Eva Lindgren, Nicolas Crisosto, Manuel Maliqueo, Barbara Echiburú, Amanda Ladrón De Guevara, Teresa Sir-Petermann, Henrik Larsson, Mina A. Rosenqvist, Carolyn E. Cesta, Anna Benrick & Qiaolin Deng
The effects of how obesity and elevated androgen levels in women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) affect their offspring are unclear. We found that daughters of PCOS mothers are more likely to be diagnosed with PCOS in a Swedish nationwide register-based cohort and a clinical case-control study from Chile. Further, female mice (F0) with PCOS-like traits induced by late gestation injection of dihydrotestosterone, with and without obesity, produced female F1–F3 offspring with a PCOS-like reproductive...

Rethinking megafauna

Marcos Moleón, José Sánchez-Zapata, José Donázar, Eloy Revilla, Berta Martín-López, Cayetano Gutiérrez-Cánovas, Wayne Getz, Zebensui Morales-Reyes, Ahimsa Campos-Arceiz, Larry Crowder, Mauro Galetti, Manuela González-Suárez, Fengzhi He, Pedro Jordano, Rebecca Lewison, Robin Naidoo, Norman Owen-Smith, Nuria Selva, Jens-Christian Svenning, José Tella, Christiane Zarfl, Sonja Jähnig, Matt Hayward, Søren Faurby, Nuria García … & Klement Tochner
Concern for megafauna is increasing among scientists and non-scientists. Many studies have emphasized that megafauna play prominent ecological roles and provide important ecosystem services to humanity. But, what precisely are “megafauna”? Here we critically assess the concept of megafauna and propose a goal-oriented framework for megafaunal research. First, we review definitions of megafauna and analyze associated terminology in the scientific literature. Second, we conduct a survey among ecologists and paleontologists to assess the species traits...

Supplementary data to “Alternative reproductive tactics are associated with sperm performance in invasive round goby from two different salinity environments”

Leon Green, Jan Niemax, Jens‐Peter Herrmann, Axel Temming & Charlotta Kvarnemo
During male-male competition, evolution can favor alternative reproductive tactics. This often results in a dominant morph that holds a resource, such as a nest for egg laying, competes with a smaller sneaker morph that reproduces by stealing fertilizations. The salinity environment can influence male growth rates, e.g. via osmoregulatory costs, which in turn may influence the use of sneaker tactics for small males competing for mating opportunities. Salinity can also affect sperm directly; however, little...

The role of spatial structure in multi-deme models of evolutionary rescue

Matteo Tomasini & Stephan Peischl
Genetic variation and population sizes are critical factors for successful adaptation to novel environmental conditions. Gene flow between sub-populations is a potent mechanism to provide such variation and can hence facilitate adaptation, for instance by increasing genetic variation or via the introduction of beneficial variants. On the other hand, if gene flow between different habitats is too strong, locally beneficial alleles may not be able to establish permanently. In the context of evolutionary rescue, intermediate...

Cryptic species in a colorful genus: integrative taxonomy of the bush robins (Aves, Muscicapidae, Tarsiger) suggests two overlooked species

Yang Liu, Chentao Wei, George Sangster, Urban Olsson, Pamela Rasmussen, Lars Svensson, Cheng-Te Yao, Geoff Carey, Paul Leader, Ruiying Zhang, Guoling Chen, Gang Song, Fumin Lei, David Wilcove & Per Alström
Several cryptic avian species have been validated by recent integrative taxonomic efforts in the Sino-Himalayan mountains, indicating that avian diversity in this global biodiversity hotspot may be underestimated. In the present study,we investigated species limits in the genus Tarsiger, the bush robins, a group of montane forest specialists with high species richness in the Sino-Himalayan region. Based on comprehensive sampling of all 11 subspecies of the six currently recognized species, we applied an integrative taxonomic...

Data from: Annual and perennial Medicago show signatures of parallel adaptation to climate and soil in highly conserved genes

José Luis Blanco-Pastor, Isabel María Liberal, Muhammet Sakiroglu, Yanling Wei, E. Charles Brummer, Rose L. Andrew & Bernard E. Pfeil
Human induced environmental change may require rapid adaptation of plant populations and crops, but the genomic basis of environmental adaptation remain poorly understood. We analyzed polymorphic loci from the perennial crop Medicago sativa (alfalfa or lucerne) and the annual legume model species M. truncatula to search for a common set of candidate genes that might contribute to adaptation to abiotic stress in both annual and perennial Medicago species. We identified a set of candidate genes...

Combining population genomics with demographic analyses highlights habitat patchiness and larval dispersal as determinants of connectivity in coastal fish species

Halvor Knutsen, Diana Catarino, Lauren Rogers, Marte Sodeland, Morten Mattingsdal, Marlene Jahnke, Jeffrey Hutchings, Ida Mellerud, Sigurd Espeland, Kerstin Johanneson, Olivia Roth, Michael Hansen, Sissel Jentoft, Carl Andre & Per Erik Jorde
Gene flow shapes spatial genetic structure as well as the potential for local adaptation of populations. Among marine animals with non-migratory adults, the presence or absence of a pelagic larval stage is thought to be a key determinant in shaping gene flow and the genetic structure of populations. In addition, the spatial distribution of suitable habitats will influence the distribution of biological populations and their pattern of gene flow. We used whole genome sequencing to...

Data from: Genetic variation for adaptive traits is associated with polymorphic inversions in Littorina saxatilis

Eva Koch, Hernán Morales, Jenny Larsson, Anja Westram, Rui Faria, Alan Lemmon, Emily Lemmon, Kerstin Johannesson & Roger Butlin
Chromosomal inversion polymorphisms, segments of chromosomes that are flipped in orientation and occur in reversed order in some individuals, have long been recognized to play an important role in local adaptation. They can reduce recombination in heterozygous individuals and thus help to maintain sets of locally adapted alleles. In a wide range of organisms, populations adapted to different habitats differ in frequency of inversion arrangements. However, getting a full understanding of the importance of inversions...

Mercury accumulation in leaves of different plant types – the significance of tissue age and specific leaf area

Håkan Pleijel, Jenny Klingberg, Michelle Nerentorp, Malin Broberg, Brigitte Nyirambangutse, John Munthe, Göran Wallin & Malin C. Broberg
Mercury, Hg, is one of the most problematic metals from an environmental perspective. To assess the problems caused by Hg in the environment it is crucial to understand the processes of Hg biogeochemistry, but the exchange of Hg between the atmosphere and vegetation is not sufficiently well characterised. We explored the mercury concentration, [Hg], in foliage from a diverse set of plant types, locations and sampling periods to study whether there is a continuous accumulation...

Inversions and genomic differentiation after secondary contact: when drift contributes to maintenance, not loss, of differentiation

Marina Rafajlovic, Jordi Rambla, Jeffrey L. Feder, Arcadi Navarro & Rui Faria
Due to their effects on reducing recombination, chromosomal inversions may play an important role in speciation by establishing and/or maintaining linked blocks of genes causing reproductive isolation (RI) between populations. This view fits empirical data indicating that inversions typically harbour loci involved in RI. However, previous computer simulations of infinite populations with 2-4 loci involved in RI implied that, even with gene flux as low as 10^(-8) per gamete, per generation between alternative arrangements, inversions...

CarniDIET 1.0: A database of terrestrial, carnivorous mammal diets

Owen Middleton, Hanna Svensson, Jorn Scharlemann, Soren Faurby & Chris Sandom
Motivation: A species’ diet is central to understanding many aspects of its biology, including its behaviour, movement, and ecological niche. The diets of terrestrial carnivorous mammals, defined here as species primarily consuming other mammals (hereafter, mammal-consumers), have been extensively studied and can vary in the proportion of different food types, and species, consumed across their geographic ranges. Accessibility to data capturing such variation in diets of mammal-consumers across the variety of ecosystems they occur in...

Data from: Coronary blood flow influences tolerance to environmental extremes in fish

Daniel Morgenroth
Approximately half of all fishes have, in addition to the luminal venous O2 supply, a coronary circulation supplying the heart with fully oxygenated blood. Yet, it is not fully understood how coronary O2 delivery affects tolerance to environmental extremes such as warming and hypoxia. Hypoxia reduces arterial oxygenation, while warming increases overall tissue O2 demand. Thus, as both stressors are associated with reduced venous O2 supply to the heart, we hypothesised that coronary flow benefits...

CarniFOSS: A database of the body mass of fossil carnivores

Søren Faurby
Motivation: Body mass is one of the most important determinants of animal ecology. Unlike other important traits it is also readily inferable from fossils and it is therefore one of the only traits that can be directly analyzed and compared between fossil and contemporary communities. Despite this, no comprehensive database of the body mass of larger clades of extinct species exists. Analysis of fossils has therefore been restricted to small clades or to smaller, potentially...

Temporally-balanced selection during development of larval Pacific oysters (Crassostrea gigas) inherently preserves genetic diversity within offspring

Evan Durland, Pierre De Wit & Chris Langdon
Balancing selection is one of the mechanisms which has been proposed to explain the maintenance of genetic diversity in species across generations. For species with large populations and complex life histories, however, heterogeneous selection pressures may create a scenario in which the net effects of selection are balanced across developmental stages. With replicated cultures and a pooled sequencing approach, we show that genotype-dependent mortality in larvae of the Pacific oyster (Crassostrea gigas) is largely temporally...

Ancestral sperm ecotypes reveal multiple invasions of a non-native fish in northern Europe

Leon Green, Apostolos Apostolou, Ellika Faust, Kajsa Palmqvist, Jane W. Behrens, Jonathan N. Havenhand, Erica H. Leder & Charlotta Kvarnemo
For externally fertilising organisms in the aquatic environment, the abiotic fertilisation medium can be a strong selecting force. Among bony fishes, sperm are adapted to function in a narrow salinity range. A notable exception is the family Gobiidae, where several species reproduce across a wide salinity range. The family also contains several wide-spread invasive species. To better understand how these fishes tolerate such varying conditions, we measured sperm performance in relation to salinity from a...

Intra-specific variation in metal tolerance modulate competition between two marine diatoms

Björn Andersson
This project contains data for the manuscript Intra-specific variation in metal tolerance modulate competition between two marine diatoms. The experiments tests how different toxic concentrations of heavy metals modulates competition between an artificially assembled community of Baltic Sea diatoms (four clonal strains each of the two diatom species Skeletonema marinoi (SM) and Thalassiosira baltica (TB). Briefly we use toxic Dose Response curves (DRC) to model how inter and intra specific selection between strains is expected...

Data from: Hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance induce gravid uterine defects in association with mitochondrial dysfunction and aberrant ROS production

Min Hu, Yuehui Zhang, Xiaozhu Guo, Wenyan Jia, Guoqi Liu, Jiao Zhang, Juan Li, Peng Cui, Amanda N. Sferruzzi-Perrie, Yanhua Han, Xiaoke Wu, Hongxia Ma, Mats Brännström, Linus R. Shao & Håkan Billig
Women with polycystic ovary syndrome (PCOS) are at increased risk of miscarriage, which often accompanies the hyperandrogenism and insulin resistance seen in these patients. However, neither the combinatorial interaction between these two PCOS-related etiological factors nor the mechanisms of their actions in the uterus during pregnancy are well understood. We hypothesised that hyperandrogensim and insulin resistance exert a causative role in miscarriage by inducing defects in uterine function that are accompanied by mitochondrial-mediated oxidative stress,...

Data from: Allele phasing greatly improves the phylogenetic utility of ultraconserved elements

Tobias Andermann, Alexandre M. Fernandes, Urban Olsson, Mats Töpel, Bernard Pfeil, Bengt Oxelman, Alexandre Aleixo, Brant C. Faircloth & Alexandre Antonelli
Advances in high-throughput sequencing techniques now allow relatively easy and affordable sequencing of large portions of the genome, even for non-model organisms. Many phylogenetic studies reduce costs by focusing their sequencing efforts on a selected set of targeted loci, commonly enriched using sequence capture. The advantage of this approach is that it recovers a consistent set of loci, each with high sequencing depth, which leads to more confidence in the assembly of target sequences. High...

Data from: Sperm duct gland contents increase sperm velocity in the sand goby

Leon Green & Charlotta Kvarnemo
Sperm performance is often tightly linked to male reproductive success. In many demersal gobiid fishes, the male attaches sperm embedded in a mucus produced by sperm duct glands, to the nest substrate before spawning takes place. Sperm are activated as the mucus and other embedded gland contents dissolve into the water. To test the importance of gland content on sperm function in Pomatoschistus minutus, a marine fish with external fertilization, we used a paired experimental...

Data from: Interpreting the genomic landscape of speciation: a road map for finding barriers to gene flow

Mark Ravinet, Rui Faria, Roger K. Butlin, Juan Galindo, Nicolas Bierne, Marina Rafajlović, Mohamed A. F. Noor, Bernhard Mehlig & Anja M. Westram
Speciation, the evolution of reproductive isolation amongst populations, is continuous, complex, and involves multiple, interacting barriers. Until it is complete, the effects of this process vary along the genome and can lead to a heterogeneous genomic landscape with peaks and troughs of differentiation and divergence. When gene flow occurs during speciation, barriers restricting migration locally in the genome lead to patterns of heterogeneity. However, genomic heterogeneity can also be produced or modified by variation in...

Data from: A universal mechanism generating clusters of differentiated loci during divergence-with-migration

Marina Rafajlović, Anna Emanuelsson, Kerstin Johannesson, Roger K. Butlin & Bernhard Mehlig
Genome-wide patterns of genetic divergence reveal mechanisms of adaptation under gene flow. Empirical data show that divergence is mostly concentrated in narrow genomic regions. This pattern may arise because differentiated loci protect nearby mutations from gene flow, but recent theory suggests this mechanism is insufficient to explain the emergence of concentrated differentiation during biologically realistic timescales. Critically, earlier theory neglects an inevitable consequence of genetic drift: stochastic loss of local genomic divergence. Here, we demonstrate...

Data from: Genotyping by sequencing and genome–environment associations in wild common bean predict widespread divergent adaptation to drought

Andrés J. Cortés & Matthew W. Blair
Drought will reduce global crop production by >10% in 2050 substantially worsening global malnutrition. Breeding for resistance to drought will require accessing crop genetic diversity found in the wild accessions from the driest high stress ecosystems. Genome–environment associations in crop wild relatives reveal natural adaptation, and therefore can be used to identify adaptive variation. We explored this approach in the food crop Phaseolus vulgaris L., characterizing 86 geo-referenced wild accessions using Genotyping by Sequencing (GBS)...

Data from: Estimating age-dependent extinction: contrasting evidence from fossils and phylogenies

Oskar Hagen, Tobias Andermann, Tiago B. Quental, Alexandre Antonelli & Daniele Silvestro
The estimation of diversification rates is one of the most vividly debated topics in modern systematics, with considerable controversy surrounding the power of phylogenetic and fossil-based approaches in estimating extinction. Van Valen’s seminal work from 1973 proposed the “Law of constant extinction” which states that the probability of extinction of taxa is not dependent on their age. This assumption of age-independent extinction has prevailed for decades with its assessment based on survivorship curves, which, however,...

Data from: PROTAX-fungi: a web-based tool for probabilistic taxonomic placement of fungal ITS sequences

Kessy Abarenkov, Panu Somervuo, R. Henrik Nilsson, Paul M. Kirk, Tea Huotari, Nerea Abrego & Otso Ovaskainen
• Incompleteness of reference sequence databases and unresolved taxonomic relationships complicates taxonomic placement of fungal sequences. We developed PROTAX-fungi, a general tool for taxonomic placement of fungal ITS sequences, and implemented it into the PlutoF platform of the UNITE database for molecular identification of fungi. • PROTAX-fungi outperformed the SINTAX and RDB classifiers in terms of increased accuracy and decreased calibration error when applied to data on mock communities representing species groups with poor sequence...

Data from: Stable coexistence of genetically divergent Atlantic cod ecotypes at multiple spatial scales

Halvor Knutsen, Per Erik Jorde, Jeffrey A. Hutchings, Jakob Hemmer-Hansen, Peter Grønkjær, Kris-Emil Mose Jørgensen, Carl Andre, Marte Sodeland, Jon Albretsen, Esben M. Olsen & Peter Grønkjaer
Coexistence in the same habitat of closely related yet genetically different populations is a phenomenon that challenges our understanding of local population structure and adaptation. Identifying the underlying mechanisms for such coexistence can yield new insight into adaptive evolution, diversification, and the potential for organisms to adapt and persist in response to a changing environment. Recent studies have documented cryptic, sympatric populations of Atlantic cod (Gadus morhua) in coastal areas. We analyzed genetic origin of...

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