21 Works

Data from: Sand lizard (Lacerta agilis) phenology in a warming world

Gabriella Ljungström, Erik Wapstra & Mats Olsson
Background: Present-day climate change has altered the phenology (the timing of periodic life cycle events) of many plant and animal populations worldwide. Some of these changes have been adaptive, leading to an increase in population fitness, whereas others have been associated with fitness decline. Representing short-term responses to an altered weather regime, hitherto observed changes are largely explained by phenotypic plasticity. However, to track climatically induced shifts in optimal phenotype as climate change proceeds, evolutionary...

Data from: Effects of mating order and male size on embryo survival in a pipefish

Ines Braga Goncalves, Kenyon B. Mobley, Ingrid Ahnesjö, Gry Sagebakken, Adam G. Jones & Charlotta Kvarnemo
In species that provide parental care, individuals should invest adaptively in their offspring in relation to the pre- and post-zygotic care provided by their partners. In the broad-nosed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle L., females transfer large, nutrient-rich eggs into the male brood pouch during mating. The male broods and nourishes the embryos for several weeks before independent juveniles emerge at parturition. Given a choice, females clearly prefer large partners. Yet, females provide protein-richer eggs when the...

Data from: Assignment of homoeologues to parental genomes in allopolyploids for species tree inference, with an example from Fumaria (Papaveraceae)

Yann J. K. Bertrand, Anne-Cathrine Scheen, Thomas Marcussen, Bernard E. Pfeil, Filipe De Sousa & Bengt Oxelman
There is a rising awareness that species trees are best inferred from multiple loci while taking into account processes affecting individual gene trees, such as substitution model error (failure of the model to account for the complexity of the data) and coalescent stochasticity (presence of incomplete lineage sorting). Although most studies have been carried out in the context of dichotomous species trees, these processes operate also in more complex evolutionary histories involving multiple hybridizations and...

Data from: Long-term acclimation to elevated pCO2 alters carbon metabolism and reduces growth in the Antarctic diatom Nitzschia lecointei

Anders Torstensson, Mikael Hedblom, My Mattsdotter Björk, Melissa Chierici & Angela Wulff
Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels are driving changes in the seawater carbonate system, resulting in higher pCO2 and reduced pH (ocean acidification). Many studies on marine organisms have focused on short-term physiological responses to increased pCO2, and few on slow-growing polar organisms with a relative low adaptation potential. In order to recognize the consequences of climate change in biological systems, acclimation and adaptation to new environments are crucial to address. In this study, physiological responses to...

Data from: Range-wide population structure of European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax

Erika L. Souche, Bart Hellemans, Massimiliano Babbucci, Eoin MacAoidh, Bruno Guinand, Luca Bargelloni, Dimitry Alexandrovich Chistiakov, Tomaso Patarnello, François Bonhomme, Jann T. Martinsohn & Filip A. M. Volckaert
The euryhaline European sea bass Dicentrarchus labrax L., inhabiting the coasts of the eastern Atlantic Ocean and Mediterranean Sea, has had many opportunities for differentiation throughout its large natural range. However, evidence for this has been incompletely documented geographically and with an insufficient number of markers. Therefore, its full range was sampled at 22 sites and individuals were genotyped with a suite of mapped markers, including 14 microsatellite loci (N = 536) and 46 neutral...

Data from: Shared and non-shared genomic divergence in parallel ecotypes of Littorina saxatilis at a local scale

Mark Ravinet, Anja Westram, Kerstin Johannesson, Roger Butlin, Carl André & Marina Panova
Parallel speciation occurs when selection drives repeated, independent adaptive divergence that reduces gene flow between ecotypes. Classical examples show parallel speciation originating from shared genomic variation, but this does not seem to be the case in the rough periwinkle (Littorina saxatilis) that has evolved considerable phenotypic diversity across Europe, including several distinct ecotypes. Small ‘wave’ ecotype snails inhabit exposed rocks and experience strong wave action, while thick-shelled, ‘crab’ ecotype snails are larger and experience crab...

Data from: Rapid growth accelerates telomere attrition in a transgenic fish

Angela Pauliny, Robert H. Devlin, Jörgen I. Johnsson & Donald Blomqvist
Background: Individuals rarely grow as fast as their physiologies permit despite the fitness advantages of being large. One reason may be that rapid growth is costly, resulting for example in somatic damage. The chromosomal ends, the telomeres, are particularly vulnerable to such damage, and telomere attrition thus influences the rate of ageing. Here, we used a transgenic salmon model with an artificially increased growth rate to test the hypothesis that rapid growth is traded off...

Data from: Genetically distinct populations of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis, in the North Atlantic: adaptation to different temperatures as an isolation factor

Per Erik Jorde, Guldborg Søvik, Jon-Ivar Westgaard, Jon Albretsen, Carl André, Carsten Hvingel, Torild Johansen, Anne Dagrun Sandvik, Michael Kingsley & Knut Eirik Jørstad
The large-scale population genetic structure of northern shrimp, Pandalus borealis, was investigated over the species’ range in the North Atlantic, identifying multiple genetically distinct groups. Genetic divergence among sample localities varied among 10 microsatellite loci (range: FST = −0.0002 to 0.0475) with a highly significant average (FST = 0.0149; P < 0.0001). In contrast, little or no genetic differences were observed among temporal replicates from the same localities (FST = 0.0004; P = 0.33). Spatial...

Data from: Eelgrass (Zostera marina) food web structure in different environmental settings

Jonas Thormar, Harald Hasler-Sheetal, Susanne Baden, Christoffer Boström, Kevin Kuhlmann Clausen, Dorte Krause-Jensen, Birgit Olesen, Jonas Ribergaard Rasmussen, Carl Johan Svensson & Marianne Holmer
This study compares the structure of eelgrass (Zostera marina L.) meadows and associated food webs in two eelgrass habitats in Denmark, differing in exposure, connection to the open sea, nutrient enrichment and water transparency. Meadow structure strongly reflected the environmental conditions in each habitat. The eutrophicated, protected site had higher biomass of filamentous algae, lower eelgrass biomass and shoot density, longer and narrower leaves, and higher above to below ground biomass ratio compared to the...

Data from: Priority effects in a planktonic bloom-forming marine diatom

Josefin Sefbom, Ingrid Sassenhagen, Karin Rengefors & Anna Godhe
Priority effects occur when a species or genotype with earlier arrival has an advantage such that its relative abundance in the community or population is increased compared with later-arriving species. Few studies have dealt with this concept in the context of within-species competition. Skeletonema marinoi is a marine diatom that shows a high degree of genetic differentiation between populations over small geographical distances. To test whether historical events such as priority effects may have been...

Data from: Embryo oxygenation in pipefish brood pouches: novel insights

Ines Braga Goncalves, Ingrid Ahnesjö & Charlotta Kvarnemo
The pipefish brood pouch presents a unique mode of parental care that enables males to protect, osmoregulate, nourish and oxygenate the developing young. Using a very fine O2 probe, we assessed the extent to which males of the broad-nosed pipefish (Syngnathus typhle) oxygenate the developing embryos and are able to maintain pouch fluid O2 levels when brooding in normoxia (100% O2 saturation) and hypoxia (40% O2 saturation) for 24 days. In both treatments, pouch fluid...

Data from: The evolutionary puzzle of egg size, oxygenation and parental care in aquatic environments

Ines Braga Goncalves, Ingrid Ahnesjö & Charlotta Kvarnemo
Offspring fitness generally improves with increasing egg size. Yet, eggs of most aquatic organisms are small. A common but largely untested assumption is that larger embryos require more oxygen than they can acquire through diffusion via the egg surface, constraining egg size evolution. However, we found no detrimental effects of large egg size on embryo growth and survival under hypoxic conditions. We tested this in the broad-nosed pipefish, Syngnathus typhle, whose males provide extensive care...

Data from: Localization of QTL for diapause and other photoperiodically regulated life-history traits important in adaptation to seasonally varying environments

Venera I. Tyukmaeva, Paris Veltsos, Jon Slate, Emma Gregson, Hannele Kauranen, Maaria Kankare, Michael G. Ritchie, Roger K. Butlin & Anneli Hoikkala
Seasonally changing environments at high latitudes present great challenges for the reproduction and survival of insects, and photoperiodic cues play an important role in helping them to synchronize their life cycle with prevalent and forthcoming conditions. We have mapped quantitative trait loci (QTL) responsible for the photoperiodic regulation of four life history traits, female reproductive diapause, cold tolerance, egg-to-eclosion development time and juvenile body weight in Drosophila montana strains from different latitudes in Canada and...

Data from: Long telomeres are associated with clonality in wild populations of the fissiparous starfish Coscinasterias tenuispina

Alex Garcia-Cisneros, Rocío Pérez-Portela, Bethanie C. Almroth, Sofie Degerman, Creu Palacín & Helen Nilsson Sköld
TelTelomeres usually shorten during an organism’s lifespan and have thus been used as an aging and health marker. When telomeres become sufficiently short, senescence is induced. The most common method of restoring telomere length is via telomerase reverse transcriptase activity, highly expressed during embryogenesis. However, although asexual reproduction from adult tissues has an important role in the life cycles of certain species, its effect on the aging and fitness of wild populations, as well as...

Data from: Local adaptation and oceanographic connectivity patterns explain genetic differentiation of a marine diatom across the North Sea-Baltic Sea salinity gradient

Conny Sjöqvist, Anna Godhe, Per R. Jonsson, Lisa Sundqvist & Anke Kremp
Drivers of population genetic structure are still poorly understood in marine micro-organisms. We exploited the North Sea–Baltic Sea transition for investigating the seascape genetics of a marine diatom, Skeletonema marinoi. Eight polymorphic microsatellite loci were analysed in 354 individuals from ten locations to analyse population structure of the species along a 1500-km-long salinity gradient ranging from 3 to 30 psu. To test for salinity adaptation, salinity reaction norms were determined for sets of strains originating...

Data from: Biological evidence supports an early and complex emergence of the Isthmus of Panama

Christine D. Bacon, Daniele Silvestro, Carlos Jaramillo, Brian Tilston Smith, Prosanta Chakrabarty & Alexandre Antonelli
The formation of the Isthmus of Panama, which linked North and South America, is key to understanding the biodiversity, oceanography, atmosphere, and climate in the region. Despite its importance across multiple disciplines, the timing of formation and emergence of the Isthmus and the biological patterns it created have been controversial. Here, we analyze molecular and fossil data, including terrestrial and marine organisms, to show that biotic migrations across the Isthmus of Panama began several million...

Data from: Bees explain floral variation in a recent radiation of Linaria

José Luis Blanco-Pastor, Concepción Ornosa, Daniel Romero, Isabel Liberal, José M. Gómez & Pablo Vargas
The role of pollinators in floral divergence has long attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Although abundant studies have reported the effect of pollinators on flower shape variation and plant speciation, the influence of pollinators on plant species differentiation during rapid radiations and the specific consequences of shifts among similar pollinators are not well understood. Here, we evaluate the association between pollinators and floral morphology in a closely related and recently diversifying clade of Linaria...

Data from: Water use by Swedish boreal forests in a changing climate

Thomas B. Hasper, Göran Wallin, Shubhangi Lamba, Marianne Hall, Fernando Jaramillo, Hjalmar Laudon, Sune Linder, Jane L. Medhurst, Mats Räntfors, Bjarni D. Sigurdsson & Johan Uddling
The rising levels of atmospheric carbon dioxide concentration ([CO2]) and temperature have the potential to substantially affect the terrestrial water and energy balance by altering the stomatal conductance and transpiration of trees. Many models assume decreases in stomatal conductance and plant water use under rising [CO2], which has been used as a plausible explanation for the positive global trend in river run-off over the past century. Plant water use is, however, also affected by changes...

Data from: Phylogeny, classification, and fruit evolution of the species-rich Neotropical bellflowers (Campanulaceae: Lobelioideae)

Laura P. Lagomarsino, Alexandre Antonelli, Nathan Muchhala, Allan Timmermann, Sarah Mathews & Charles C. Davis
Premise of the study: The species-rich Neotropical genera Centropogon, Burmeistera, and Siphocampylus represent more than half of the ∼1200 species in the subfamily Lobelioideae (Campanulaceae). They exhibit remarkable morphological variation in floral morphology and habit. Limited taxon sampling and phylogenetic resolution, however, obscures our understanding of relationships between and within these genera and underscores our uncertainty of the systematic value of fruit type as a major diagnostic character. Methods: We inferred a phylogeny from five...

Data from: Serotonin depletion-induced maladaptive aggression requires the presence of androgens

Erik Studer, Jakob Näslund, Erik Andersson, Staffan Nilsson, Lars Westberg & Elias Eriksson
The sex hormone testosterone and the neurotransmitter serotonin exert opposite effects on several aspects of behavior including territorial aggression. It is however not settled if testosterone exerts its pro-aggressive effects by reducing serotonin transmission and/or if the anti-aggressive effect of serotonin requires the presence of the androgen. Using the resident intruder test, we now show that administration of the serotonin synthesis inhibitor para-chlorophenylalanine (300 mg/kg x 3 days) increases the total time of attack as...

Data from: Genotype reconstruction of paternity in European lobsters (Homarus gammarus)

Charlie D. Ellis, David J. Hodgson, Carl André, Tonje K. Sørdalen, Halvor Knutsen & Amber G. F. Griffiths
Decapod crustaceans exhibit considerable variation in fertilisation strategies, ranging from pervasive single paternity to the near-ubiquitous presence of multiple paternity, and such knowledge of mating systems and behaviour are required for the informed management of commercially-exploited marine fisheries. We used genetic markers to assess the paternity of individual broods in the European lobster, Homarus gammarus, a species for which paternity structure is unknown. Using 13 multiplexed microsatellite loci, three of which are newly described in...

Registration Year

  • 2015
    21

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    21

Affiliations

  • University of Gothenburg
    21
  • University of Oslo
    3
  • Uppsala University
    3
  • Lund University
    2
  • Aarhus University
    2
  • University of Tasmania
    2
  • Åbo Akademi University
    2
  • University of Zurich
    2
  • Spanish National Research Council
    2
  • University of Sheffield
    2