250 Works

Data from: Tree recruitment failure in old-growth forest patches across human-modified rainforests

Ricard Arasa-Gisbert, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Carmen Galán-Acedo, Jorge A. Meave & Miguel Martínez-Ramos
1. Land-use change threatens biodiversity in tropical landscapes, but its impact on forest regeneration remains poorly known. In fact, the landscape-scale patterns driving the diversity of regenerating plants within forest fragments have been rarely explored, and we are uncertain whether such drivers vary across regions with different land-use change patterns. 2. We assessed the effect of landscape composition (forest cover and matrix openness) and configuration (forest patch density) on species diversity of sapling assemblages (trees...

Data from: Background matching, disruptive coloration and differential use of microhabitats in two neotropical grasshoppers with sexual dichromatism

Víctor Hugo Ramírez-Delgado & Raúl Cueva Del Castillo
Cryptic coloration is an adaptative defensive mechanism against predators. Color patterns can become cryptic through background coloration-matching and disruptive coloration. Disruptive coloration may evolve in visually heterogeneous microhabitats, whereas background matching could be favored in chromatically homogeneous microhabitats. In this work, we used digital photography to explore the potential use of disruptive coloration and background matching in males and females of two grasshopper species of the Sphenarium genus in different habitats. We found chromatic differences...

Good alimentation can overcome the negative effects of climate change on growth in reptiles

Pilar Rueda-Zozaya, Melissa Plasman & Victor Hugo Reynoso
Climate change may lead to higher nest temperatures, which may increase embryo development rate, but reduce hatchling size and growth. Larger body size permits better performance, making growth an important fitness trait. In ectotherms, growth is affected by temperature and food quality. To segregate the effects of incubation temperature vs. alimentation on the growth of the Mexican black spiny tailed iguana Ctenosaura pectinata, we incubated eggs at 29 and 32ºC, and hatchlings were kept at...

Data from: Low-copy nuclear genes reveal new evidence of incongruence in relationships within Malvaceae s.l.

Rebeca Hernández-Gutiérrez, Carolina Granados Mendoza & Susana Magallón
The family Malvaceae s. l. is a clade that comprises nine subfamilies. Phylogenetic relationships among them are not completely resolved and are inconsistent among studies, probably due to low phylogenetic informativeness of conventional molecular markers. In the present study, we provide new phylogenetic information for Malvaceae s.l. derived from newly-designed group-specific nuclear markers. By mining transcriptome data from the One Thousand Plant Project (1KP) and publicly available genome information from cotton, cacao, and Arabidopsis, we...

Data from: Limitations of climate data for inferring species boundaries: insights from speckled rattlesnakes

Jesse M. Meik, Jeffrey W. Streicher, A. Michelle Lawing, Oscar Flores-Villela & Matthew K. Fujita
Phenotypes, DNA, and measures of ecological differences are widely used in species delimitation. Although rarely defined in such studies, ecological divergence is almost always approximated using multivariate climatic data associated with sets of specimens (i.e., the “climatic niche”); the justification for this approach is that species-specific climatic envelopes act as surrogates for physiological tolerances. Using identical statistical procedures, we evaluated the usefulness and validity of the climate-as-proxy assumption by comparing performance of genetic (nDNA SNPs...

Data from: Untangling the evolutionary history of a highly polymorphic species: introgressive hybridization and high genetic structure in the desert cichlid fish Herichthys minckleyi

Isabel S. Magalhaes, Claudia Patricia Ornelas-García, Mariana Leal-Cardin, Tania Ramírez & Marta Barluenga
Understanding the origin of biodiversity requires knowledge on the evolutionary processes that drive divergence and speciation, as well as on the processes constraining it. Intraspecific polymorphisms can provide insight into the mechanisms that generate and maintain phenotypic, behavioural and life history diversification, and can help us understand not only the processes that lead to speciation but also the processes that prevent local fixation of morphs. The ‘desert cichlid’ Herichtys minckleyi is a highly polymorphic species...

Data from: Phylogenomic resolution of scorpions reveals multilevel discordance with morphological phylogenetic signal

Prashant P. Sharma, Rosa Fernández, Lauren A. Esposito, Edmundo González-Santillán, Lionel Monod, E. Gonzalez-Santillan & R. Fernandez
Scorpions represent an iconic lineage of arthropods, historically renowned for their unique bauplan, ancient fossil record and venom potency. Yet, higher level relationships of scorpions, based exclusively on morphology, remain virtually untested, and no multilocus molecular phylogeny has been deployed heretofore towards assessing the basal tree topology. We applied a phylogenomic assessment to resolve scorpion phylogeny, for the first time, to our knowledge, sampling extensive molecular sequence data from all superfamilies and examining basal relationships...

Data from: An experimental demonstration that house finches add cigarette butts in response to ectoparasites

Monserrat Suárez-Rodríguez & Constantino Macías Garcia
Urban species encounter resources that are uncommon in nature, such as materials found in city waste. Many studies have shown that these can be harmful to wildlife. In Mexico City, house finches bring cigarette butts to their nests, which reduces the amount of ectoparasites, but also induces genotoxic damage in chicks and parents. Yet, the reason for this behaviour is unknown. One possibility is that birds extract the cellulose fibres from discarded butts simply because...

Data from: Range‐wide population genetic structure of the Caribbean marine angiosperm Thalassia testudinum

Kor-Jent Van Dijk, Eric Bricker, Brigitta Ine Van Tussenbroek & Michelle Waycott
Many marine species have widespread geographic ranges derived from their evolutionary and ecological history particularly their modes of dispersal. Seagrass (marine angiosperm) species have ranges that are unusually widespread, which is not unexpected following recent reviews of reproductive strategies demonstrating the potential for long distance dispersal combined with longevity through clonality. An exemplar of these dual biological features is turtlegrass (Thalassia testudinum) which is an ecologically important species throughout the tropical Atlantic region. Turtlegrass has...

Data from: Changing drivers of species dominance during tropical forest succession

Madelon Lohbeck, Lourens Poorter, Miguel Martínez-Ramos, Jorge Rodriguez-Velázquez, Michiel Van Breugel & Frans Bongers
1. Deterministic theories predict that local communities assemble from a regional species pool based on niche differences, thus by plant functional adaptations. We tested whether functional traits can also explain patterns in species dominance among the suite of co-occurring species. 2. We predicted that along a gradient of secondary succession the main driver of species dominance changes from environmental filtering in the relatively harsh (dry and hot) early successional conditions, towards increased competitive interactions and...

Data from: UV photoreceptors and UV-yellow wing pigments in Heliconius butterflies allow a color signal to serve both mimicry and intraspecific communication

Seth M. Bybee, Furong Yuan, Monica D. Ramstetter, Jorge Llorente-Bousquets, Robert D. Reed, Daniel Osorio & Adriana D. Briscoe
Mimetic wing coloration evolves in butterflies in the context of predator confusion. Unless butterfly eyes have adaptations for discriminating mimetic color variation, mimicry also carries a risk of confusion for the butterflies themselves. Heliconius butterfly eyes, which express recently duplicated UV opsins, have such an adaptation. To examine bird and butterfly color vision as sources of selection on butterfly coloration we studied yellow wing pigmentation in the tribe Heliconiini. We confirmed using reflectance and mass...

Data from: Arthropod distribution in a tropical rainforest: tackling a four dimensional puzzle

Yves Basset, Lukas Cizek, Philippe Cuénoud, Raphael K. Didham, Vojtech Novotny, Frode Ødegaard, Tomas Roslin, Alexey K. Tishechkin, Jürgen Schmidl, Neville N. Winchester, David W. Roubik, Henri-Pierre Aberlenc, Johannes Bail, Héctor Barrios, Jonathan R. Bridle, Gabriela Castaño-Meneses, Bruno Corbara, Gianfranco Curletti, Wesley Duarte Da Rocha, Domir De Bakker, Jacques H.C. Delabie, Alain Dejean, Laura L. Fagan, Andreas Floren, Roger L. Kitching … & Jacques H. C. Delabie
Quantifying the spatio-temporal distribution of arthropods in tropical rainforests represents a first step towards scrutinizing the global distribution of biodiversity on Earth. To date most studies have focused on narrow taxonomic groups or lack a design that allows partitioning of the components of diversity. Here, we consider an exceptionally large dataset (113,952 individuals representing 5,858 species), obtained from the San Lorenzo forest in Panama, where the phylogenetic breadth of arthropod taxa was surveyed using 14...

Data from: Genomic variation in recently collected maize landraces from Mexico

María Clara Arteaga, Alejandra Moreno-Letelier, Alicia Mastretta-Yanes, Alejandra Vázquez-Lobo, Alejandra Breña-Ochoa, Andrés Moreno-Estrada, Luis E. Eguiarte & Daniel Piñero
The present dataset comprises 36,931 SNPs genotyped in 46 maize landraces native to Mexico as well as the teosinte subspecies Zea maiz ssp. Parviglumis and ssp. Mexicana. These landraces were collected directly from farmers mostly between 2006 and 2010. We accompany these data with a short description of the variation within each landrace, as well as maps, principal component analyses and neighbor joining trees showing the distribution of the genetic diversity relative to landrace, geographical...

Data from: Biomass resilience of Neotropical secondary forests

Lourens Poorter, Frans Bongers, T. Mitchell Aide, Angélica M. Almeyda Zambrano, Patricia Balvanera, Justin M. Becknell, Vanessa Boukili, Pedro H. S. Brancalion, Eben N. Broadbent, Robin L. Chazdon, Dylan Craven, Jarcilene S. De Almeida-Cortez, George A. L. Cabral, Ben H. J. De Jong, Julie S. Denslow, Daisy H. Dent, Saara J. DeWalt, Juan M. Dupuy, Sandra M. Durán, Mario M. Espírito-Santo, María C. Fandino, Ricardo G. César, Jefferson S. Hall, José Luis Hernandez-Stefanoni, Catarina C. Jakovac … & Danaë M. A. Rozendaal
Land-use change occurs nowhere more rapidly than in the tropics, where the imbalance between deforestation and forest regrowth has large consequences for the global carbon cycle1. However, considerable uncertainty remains about the rate of biomass recovery in secondary forests, and how these rates are influenced by climate, landscape, and prior land use2, 3, 4. Here we analyse aboveground biomass recovery during secondary succession in 45 forest sites and about 1,500 forest plots covering the major...

Data from: The evolution of bat nucleic acid sensing Toll-like receptors

Marina Escalera-Zamudio, Lisandra M. Zepeda-Mendoza, Elizabeth Loza-Rubio, Edith Rojas-Anaya, Maria L. Méndez-Ojeda, Carlos F. Arias & Alex D. Greenwood
We characterized the nucleic acid sensing Toll-like receptors (TLR) of a New World bat species, the common vampire bat (Desmodus rotundus), and through a comparative molecular evolutionary approach searched for general adaptation patterns among the nucleic acid sensing TLRs of eight different bats species belonging to three families (Pteropodidae, Vespertilionidae and Phyllostomidae). We found that the bat TLRs are evolving slowly and mostly under purifying selection and that the divergence pattern of such receptors is...

Data from: A new platychelyid turtle (Pan-Pleurodira) from the Late Jurassic (Kimmeridgian) of Oaxaca, México

Oliver Ariel López-Conde, Juliana Sterli, Jesús Alvarado-Ortega & María Luisa Chavarría-Arellano
Until recently, the record of Mesozoic turtles in Mexico has been restricted to the Cretaceous. New discoveries in the Sabinal Formation (Tlaxiaco, Oaxaca) have extended the record into the Kimmeridgian (Late Jurassic). The Sabinal Formation is part of the Tlaxiaco Basin, which was a depocenter of continental and marine sediments dominated by transgressive-regressive marine conditions during the Jurassic–Cretaceous. The new turtle described here consists of an almost complete carapace associated with a plastron. Based on...

Data from: Competition and facilitation determine dwarf mistletoe infection dynamics

Mónica E. Queijeiro-Bolaños, Edgar Javier González, Carlos Martorell & Zenón Cano-Santana
1. Interspecific interactions have a fundamental role in plant population dynamics, as they may set the conditions for species coexistence. Parasitic plants, like dwarf mistletoes, offer the opportunity to study competition for resources that are different from those consumed by most plants, allowing for a better understanding of the interaction. 2. We explored how interspecific interactions between two dwarf mistletoe species (Arceuthobium), co-infecting the same host species (even sharing the same individual tree of Pinus...

Data from: Identifying management actions to increase foraging opportunities for shorebirds at semi-intensive shrimp farms

Juan G. Navedo, Guillermo Fernández, Nelson Valdivia, Mark C. Drever & Jose A. Masero
The expansion of aquaculture has resulted in widespread habitat conversion throughout the world. Identifying beneficial management measures may dramatically reduce negative impacts of aquaculture for migratory birds. We studied how densities of foraging shorebirds varied at ponds within a semi-intensive shrimp aquaculture farm on the north-western coast of Mexico, as related to timing of harvest and tidal cycles. Further, we estimated the total daily available area for each shorebird species throughout two entire harvesting seasons...

Data from: Columnar cacti as sources of energy and protein for frugivorous bats in a semi-arid ecosystem

L. Gerardo Herrera M. & Teresa López R.
Columnar cacti constitute the dominant elements in the vegetation structure of arid and semi-arid New World ecosystems representing a plethora of food resources for vertebrate consumers. Previous stable isotope analysis in Central Mexico showed that columnar cacti are of low importance to build tissue for frugivorous bats. We used carbon stable isotope analysis of whole blood and breath samples collected from four species of frugivorous bats (Sturnira parvidens, Sturnira ludovici, Artibeus jamaicensis, and Artibeus intermedius)...

Data from: A new species of horned lizard (genus Phrynosoma) from Guerrero, México, with an updated multilocus phylogeny

Adrián Nieto-Montes De Oca, Diego Arenas-Moreno, Elizabeth Beltrán-Sánchez & Adam D. Leaché
We describe a new species of Phrynosoma from central northeastern Guerrero, México; perform a phylogenetic analysis of mitochondrial and nuclear sequence data to estimate its phylogenetic relationships; and investigate the monophyly of Phrynosoma asio, P. braconnieri, and P. taurus. The new species can be distinguished from all of its congeners by the possession of a unique combination of morphological characteristics. The molecular genetic data include three fragments of the mitochondrial genome and six nuclear genes...

Data from: Do freshwater ecoregions and continental shelf width predict patterns of historical gene flow in the freshwater fish Poecilia butleri?

J. Jaime Zúñiga-Vega, Spencer J. Ingley, Peter J. Unmack & Jerald B. Johnson
We examined historical patterns of gene flow in the freshwater fish Poecilia butleri in western Mexico. We tested the hypothesis that the boundaries between four freshwater ecological communities (ecoregions) might have limited the movement of P. butleri because changes in species compositions might restrict establishment between adjacent ecoregions, even in situations where a physical barrier is absent. Hence, we predicted that boundaries between ecoregions should correspond to phylogeographical breaks in P. butleri. We also tested...

Data from: The impact of reconstruction methods, phylogenetic uncertainty and branch lengths on inference of chromosome number evolution in American daisies (Melampodium, Asteraceae)

Jamie McCann, Gerald M. Schneeweiss, Tod F. Stuessy, Jose L. Villaseñor & Hanna Weiss-Schneeweiss
Chromosome number change (polyploidy and dysploidy) plays an important role in plant diversification and speciation. Investigating chromosome number evolution commonly entails ancestral state reconstruction performed within a phylogenetic framework, which is, however, prone to uncertainty, whose effects on evolutionary inferences are insufficiently understood. Using the chromosomally diverse plant genus Melampodium (Asteraceae) as model group, we assess the impact of reconstruction method (maximum parsimony, maximum likelihood, Bayesian methods), branch length model (phylograms versus chronograms) and phylogenetic...

Data from: Molecular proxies for climate maladaptation in a long-lived tree (Pinus pinaster Aiton, Pinaceae)

Juan Pablo Jaramilo-Correa, Isabel Rodríguez-Quilón, Delphine Grivet, Camille Lepoittevin, Federico Sebastiani, Myriam Heuertz, Pauline H. Garnier-Géré, Ricardo Alía, Christophe Plomion, Giovanni G. Vendramin, Santiago C. González-Martínez, J.-P. Jaramillo-Correa, S. C. Gonzalez-Martinez & P. H. Garnier-Gere
Understanding adaptive genetic responses to climate change is a main challenge for preserving biological diversity. Successful predictive models for climate-driven range shifts of species depend on the integration of information on adaptation, including that derived from genomic studies. Long-lived forest trees can experience substantial environmental change across generations, which results in a much more prominent adaptation lag than in annual species. Here, we show that candidate-gene SNPs (Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms) can be used as predictors...

Data from: Related plant species respond similarly to chronic anthropogenic disturbance: implications for conservation decision-making

Alejandra Martínez-Blancas, Horacio Paz, Gerardo A. Salazar & Carlos Martorell
1. Many developing countries harbor inordinate numbers of species that face little-understood, gradual changes in their environment, such as chronic anthropogenic disturbance (CAD, a high frequency but low intensity form of disturbance). These countries also lack the resources to study each species, so conservation practices have had to be generalized assuming that complete taxonomic groups (e.g., cacti or cetaceans) may be managed in the same way. This could be justified if closely related species respond...

Data from: Relating species richness to the structure of continuous landscapes: alternative methodological approaches

J. Alberto Gallardo-Cruz, J. Luis Hernández-Stefanoni, Dietmar Moser, Angelina Martínez-Yrízar, Sergi Llobet & Jorge A. Meave
Numerous studies have focused on the relationship between landscape structure and plant diversity based on the patch-mosaic landscape paradigm, by deriving structural data from classified images. Since the use of discrete classes poses limitations for predicting biodiversity patterns in complex, low human-impacted ecosystems, two alternative methods have been used to analyze changes of landscape attributes in a continuum: moving-window metrics and surface metrics (image texture). Here we compare these two approaches for predicting richness of...

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