7 Works

Data on immunological expression and phenotypes in a natural population of field voles in Kielder Forest, UK 2015-2017

S. Paterson, J. Jackson, I. Jackson, J. Bradley, M. Begon, K. Wanelik & C. Taylor
Data comprise morphometric measurements, sex determination, maturity and immunological analysis of blood pathogens from wild field voles (Microtus agrestis) in Kielder Forest, Northumberland, UK in 2015-17.

Craniodental morphology and phylogeny of marsupials

Robin M. D. Beck, Robert S. Voss & Sharon A. Jansa
The current literature on marsupial phylogenetics includes numerous studies based on analyses of morphological data with limited sampling of Recent and fossil taxa and many studies based on analyses of molecular data with dense sampling of Recent taxa, but few studies have combined both data types. Another dichotomy in the marsupial phylogenetic literature is between studies focused on New World taxa, and those focused on Sahulian taxa. To date, there has been no attempt to...

Next-generation phylogeography resolves post-glacial colonization patterns in a widespread carnivore, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in Europe

Allan McDevitt, Ilaria Coscia, Samuel S Browett, Aritz Ruiz-Gonzalez, Mark Statham, Inka Ruczynska, Liam Roberts, Joanna Stojak, Alain Frantz, Karin Norén, Erik Agren, Jane Learmount, Mafalda Basto, Carlos Fernandes, Peter Stuart, David G Tosh, Magda Sindicic, Tibor Andreanszky, Marja Isomursu, Marek Panek, Andrey Korolev, Innokentiy M Okhlopkov, Alexander P Saveljev, Bostjan Pokorny, Katarina Flajsman … & Jan Wójcik
Carnivores tend to exhibit a lack of (or less pronounced) genetic structure at continental scales in both a geographic and temporal sense using various mitochondrial DNA markers on modern and/or ancient specimens. This tends to confound the identification of refugial areas and post-glacial colonization patterns in this group. In this study we used Genotyping-by-Sequencing (GBS) to reconstruct the phylogeographic history of a widespread carnivore, the red fox (Vulpes vulpes), in Europe by investigating broad-scale patterns...

Hemotological and morphometric measurements from geladas

Kenneth L. Chiou, Mareike C. Janiak, India A. Schneider-Crease, Sharmi Sen, Ferehiwot Ayele, Idrissa S. Chuma, Sascha Knauf, Alemayehu Lemma, Anthony V. Signore, Anthony M. D’Ippolito, Belayneh Abebe, Abebaw Azanaw Haile, Fanuel Kebede, Peter J. Fashing, Nga Nguyen, Colleen McCann, Marlys L. Houck, Jeffrey D. Wall, Andrew S. Burrell, Christina M. Bergey, Jeffrey Rogers, Jane E. Phillips-Conroy, Clifford J. Jolly, Amanda D. Melin, Jay F. Storz … & Noah Snyder-Mackler
Primates have adapted to numerous environments and lifestyles but very few species are native to high elevations. Here, we investigated high-altitude adaptations in the gelada (Theropithecus gelada), a monkey endemic to the Ethiopian Plateau. We examined genome-wide variation in conjunction with measurements of haematological and morphological traits. Our new gelada reference genome is highly intact and assembled at chromosome-length levels. Unexpectedly, we identified a chromosomal polymorphism in geladas that could potentially contribute to reproductive barriers...

Data from: Cranial remains of Ramsayia magna from the Late Pleistocene of Australia and the evolution of gigantism in wombats (Vombatidae; Marsupialia)

Julien Louys, Mathieu Duval, Robin M.D. Beck, Eleanor Pease, Ian Sobbe, Noel Sands & Gilbert J. Price
Giant wombats (defined here as body mass ≥ 70 kg) are found in the genera Phascolonus, Ramsayia, and perhaps also Sedophascolomys. Of these, Ramsayia is the currently the most poorly known, having been described from fragmentary mandibular and cranial fragments. Here, we report the most complete cranial remains attributable to the genus, identified as the species R. magna. The remains provide new important insights into the anatomy of the species and the evolutionary adaptations to...

Edge effects and vertical stratification of aerial insectivorous bats across the interface of primary-secondary Amazonian rainforest

Natalie Yoh, James Clarke, Adrià López-Baucells, Maria Mas, Paulo E.D. Bobrowiec, Ricardo Rocha & Christoph F.J. Meyer
Edge effects - abiotic and biotic changes associated with habitat boundaries - are key drivers of community change in fragmented landscapes. Their influence is heavily modulated by matrix composition. With over half of the world’s tropical forests predicted to become forest edge by the end of the century, it is paramount that conservationists gain a better understanding of how tropical biota is impacted by edge gradients. Bats comprise a large fraction of tropical mammalian fauna...

Challenging a host-pathogen paradigm: Susceptibility to chytridiomycosis is decoupled from genetic erosion

Donal Smith, David O'Brien, Jeanette Hall, Chris Sergeant, Lola Brookes, Xavier Harrison, Trenton Garner & Robert Jehle
The putatively positive association between host genetic diversity and the ability to defend against pathogens has long attracted the attention of evolutionary biologists. Chytridiomycosis, a disease caused by the chytrid fungus Batrachochytrium dendrobatidis (Bd), has emerged in recent decades as a cause of dramatic declines and extinctions across the amphibian clade. Bd susceptibility can vary widely across populations of the same species, but the relationship between standing genetic diversity and susceptibility has remained notably underexplored...

Registration Year

  • 2022
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  • Dataset
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Affiliations

  • University of Salford
    7
  • Institute of Biology of Komi Scientific Centre
    1
  • University of the Basque Country
    1
  • National Veterinary Institute
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  • University of Michigan–Ann Arbor
    1
  • University of Zagreb
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  • Duke University
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  • University of Queensland
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  • University of Kent
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  • Lusíada University of Lisbon
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