13 Works

Data from: Land-use intensification effects on functional properties in tropical plant communities

Geovana Carreño-Rocabado, Marielos Peña-Claros, Frans Bongers, Sandra Díaz, Fabien Quétier, José Chuviña & Lourens Poorter
There is consensus that plant diversity and ecosystem processes are negatively affected by land-use intensification (LUI), but, at the same time, there is empirical evidence that a large heterogeneity can be found in the responses. This heterogeneity is especially poorly understood in tropical ecosystems. We evaluated changes in community functional properties across five common land-use types in the wet tropics with different land-use intensity: mature forest, logged forest, secondary forest, agricultural land, and pastureland, located...

Data from: Factors determining forest diversity and biomass on a tropical volcano, Mt. Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia

Gbadamassi G. O. Dossa, Ekananda Paudel, Junichi Fujinuma, Haiying Yu, Wanlop Chutipong, Yuan Zhang, Sherryl Paz, Rhett D. Harrison & Nathan G. Swenson
Tropical volcanoes are an important but understudied ecosystem, and the relationships between plant species diversity and compositional change and elevation may differ from mountains created by uplift, because of their younger and more homogeneous soils. We sampled vegetation over an altitudinal gradient on Mt. Rinjani, Lombok, Indonesia. We modeled alpha- (plot) and beta- (among plot) diversity (Fisher’s alpha), compositional change, and biomass against elevation and selected covariates. We also examined community phylogenetic structure across the...

Data from: Shifting baselines on a tropical forest frontier: extirpations drive declines in local ecological knowledge

Zhong Kai, Teoh Shu Woan, Li Jie, Eben Goodale, Kaoru Kitajima, Robert Bagchi, Rhett D. Harrison & Zhang Kai
The value of local ecological knowledge (LEK) to conservation is increasingly recognised, but LEK is being rapidly lost as indigenous livelihoods change. Biodiversity loss is also a driver of the loss of LEK, but quantitative study is lacking. In our study landscape in SW China, a large proportion of species have been extirpated. Hence, we were interested to understand whether species extirpation might have led to an erosion of LEK and the implications this might...

Data from: Structure of the epiphyte community in a tropical montane forest in SW China

Mingxu Zhao, Nalaka Geekiyanage, Jianchu Xu, Myo Myo Khin, Dian Ridwan Nurdiana, Ekananda Paudel & Rhett Daniel Harrison
Vascular epiphytes are an understudied and particularly important component of tropical forest ecosystems. However, owing to the difficulties of access, little is known about the properties of epiphyte-host tree communities and the factors structuring them, especially in Asia. We investigated factors structuring the vascular epiphyte-host community and its network properties in a tropical montane forest in Xishuangbanna, SW China. Vascular epiphytes were surveyed in six plots located in mature forests. Six host and four micro-site...

Data from: Correct calculation of CO2 efflux using a closed-chamber linked to a non-dispersive infrared gas analyzer

Gbadamassi G. O. Dossa, Ekananda Paudel, Hongyan Wang, Kunfang Cao, Douglas Schaefer & Rhett D. Harrison
1. Improved understanding of the carbon (C) cycle is essential to model future climates and how this may feedback to affect greenhouse-gas fluxes. 2 .We summarize previous work quantifying respiration rates of organic substrates and briefly discuss how advances in technology, specifically the use of chambers linked to a non-dispersive infra-red gas analyzer (NDIR), can be applied to assess carbon dynamics from short-term field measurements. This technology hastens measurement and is relatively inexpensive, enabling researchers...

Data from: Indications for three independent domestication events for the tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze) and new insights into the origin of tea germplasm in China and India revealed by nuclear microsatellites

M. K. Meegahakumbura, M. Wambulwa, K. K. Thapa, M. M. Li, M. Möller, J.C. Xu, J.B. Yang, B.Y. Liu, S. Ranjitkar, J. Liu, D.Z. Li, L.M. Gao, M. C. Wambulwa, D. Z. Li, L. M. Gao, J. B. Yang & J. C. Xu
Background: Tea is the world’s most popular non-alcoholic beverage. China and India are known to be the largest tea producing countries and recognized as the centers for the domestication of the tea plant (Camellia sinensis (L.) O. Kuntze). However, molecular studies on the origin, domestication and relationships of the main teas, China type, Assam type and Cambod type are lacking. Methodology/Principal Findings: Twenty-three nuclear microsatellite markers were used to investigate the genetic diversity, relatedness, and...

Data from: Yet another empty forest: considering the conservation value of a recently established tropical nature reserve

Rachakonder Sreekar, Kai Zhang, Jianchu Xu, Rhett D. Harrison & Rachakonda Sreekar
The primary approach used to conserve tropical biodiversity is in the establishment of protected areas. However, many tropical nature reserves are performing poorly and interventions in the broader landscape may be essential for conserving biodiversity both within reserves and at large. Between October 2010 and 2012, we conducted bird surveys in and around a recently established nature reserve in Xishuangbanna, China. We constructed a checklist of observed species, previously recorded species, and species inferred to...

Data from: Conservative species drive biomass productivity in tropical dry forests

Jamir A. Prado Junior, Ivan Schiavini, Vagner S. Vale, Carolina S. Arantes, Masha T. Van Der Sande, Madelon Lohbeck, Lourens Poorter & Jamir A. Prado-Junior
1. Forests account for a substantial part of the terrestrial biomass storage and productivity. To better understand forest productivity we need to disentangle the processes underlying net biomass change. 2. We tested how above-ground net biomass change and its underlying biomass dynamics (biomass recruitment, growth, and mortality) can be explained by four alterative and contested hypotheses; the soil fertility, biomass ratio, niche complementarity and vegetation quantity hypotheses. 3. Above-ground biomass dynamics were evaluated over a...

Data from: The cover uncovered: bark control over wood decomposition

Gbadamassi G.O. Dossa, Douglas Schaefer, Jiao-Lin Zhang, Jian-Ping Tao, Kun-Fang Cao, Richard T. Corlett, Anthony B. Cunningham, Jian-Chu Xu, Johannes H. C. Cornelissen, Rhett D. Harrison & Gbadamassi G. O. Dossa
1. Woody debris (WD) represents a globally significant carbon stock and its decomposition returns nutrients to the soil while providing habitat to microbes, plants and animals. Understanding what drives WD decomposition is therefore important. 2. WD decomposition rates differ greatly among species. However, the role of bark in the process remains poorly known. 3. We ask how, and how much, interspecific variation in bark functional traits related to growth and protection have afterlife effects on...

Data from: Phylogenetic diversity correlated with aboveground biomass production during forest succession: evidence from tropical forests in Southeast Asia

Manichanh Satdichanh, Huaixia Ma, Kai Yan, Gbadamassi G.O. Dossa, Leigh Winowiecki, Tor-Gunnar Vågen, Anja Gassner, Jianchu Xu & Rhett D. Harrison
1. Enhancing knowledge on the role of evolutionary history during forest succession and its relationship with ecosystem function is particularly relevant in the context of forest landscape restoration for climate change mitigation and adaptation. 2. We used fine resolution vegetation and environmental data (soil, elevation and slope) from two large-scale surveys (320 x 1000 m2 plots in two 10 km x 10 km blocks) in the Upper Mekong to quantify (1) the role of abiotic...

Cocoa agroforest multifunctionality and soil fertility explained by shade tree litter traits

Marie Sauvadet, Stéphane Saj, Grégoire Freschet, Jean-Daniel Essobo, Séguy Enock, Thierry Becquer, Philippe Tixier & Jean-Michel Harmand
Manipulating plant functional diversity to improve agroecosystem multifunctionality is a central challenge of agricultural systems worldwide. In cocoa agroforestry systems (cAFS), shade trees are used to supply many services to farmers, yet their impact on soil functioning and cocoa yields is likely to vary substantially among tree species. Here, we compared the impact of five shade tree species (Canarium schweinfurthii (Canarium), Dacryoides edulis (Safou), Milicia excelsa (Iroko), Ceiba pentandra (Kapok tree), Albizia adianthifolia (Albizia)) and...

Data from: Using plant functional traits and phylogenies to understand patterns of plant community assembly in a seasonal tropical forest in Lao PDR

Manichanh Satdichanh, Jérôme Millet, Andreas Heinimann, Khamseng Nanthavong & Rhett D. Harrison
Plant functional traits reflect different evolutionary responses to environmental variation, and among extant species determine the outcomes of interactions between plants and their environment, including other plant species. Thus, combining phylogenetic and trait-based information can be a powerful approach for understanding community assembly processes across a range of spatial scales. We used this approach to investigate tree community composition at Phou Khao Khouay National Park (18°14’-18°32’N; 102°38’- 102°59’E), Laos, where several distinct forest types occur...

Data from: Soil-mediated filtering organizes tree assemblages in regenerating tropical forests

Bruno Ximenes Pinho, Felipe Pimentel Lopes De Melo, Víctor Arroyo-Rodríguez, Simon Pierce, Madelon Lohbeck & Marcelo Tabarelli
1.Secondary forests are increasingly dominant in human-modified tropical landscapes, but the drivers of forest recovery remain poorly understood. Soil conditions influence plant community composition, and are expected to change over a gradient of succession. However, the role of soil conditions as an environmental filter driving community assembly during forest succession has rarely been explicitly assessed. 2.We evaluated the role of stand basal area and soil conditions on community assembly and its consequences for community functional...

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