113 Works

Living beside an explosive volcano during a long eruption requires changes to standard public outreach tactics

R. N. Thompson

Data from: Visual and non-visual navigation in blind patients with a retinal prosthesis

Sara Garcia, Karin Petrini, Gary S. Rubin, Lyndon Da Cruz & Marko Nardini
Human adults with normal vision can combine visual landmark and non-visual self-motion cues to improve their navigational precision. Here we asked whether blind individuals treated with a retinal prosthesis could also benefit from using the resultant new visual signal together with non-visual information when navigating. Four patients (blind for 15-52 years) implanted with the Argus II retinal prosthesis (Second Sight Medical Products Inc. Sylmar, CA), and five age-matched and six younger controls, participated. Participants completed...

Data from: Non-linear effects of phylogenetic distance on early-stage establishment of experimentally introduced plants in grassland communities

Eva Maria Malecore, Wayne Dawson, Anne Kempel, Gregor Müller & Mark Van Kleunen
1. The phylogenetic distance of an introduced plant species to a resident native community may play a role in determining its establishment success. While Darwin’s naturalization hypothesis predicts a positive relationship, the preadaptation hypothesis predicts a negative relationship. Rigorous tests of this now so-called Darwin’s naturalization conundrum require not only information on establishment successes but also of failures, which is frequently not available. Such essential information, however, can be provided by experimental introductions. 2. Here,...

Data from: Flexibility, variability and constraint in energy management strategies across vertebrate taxa revealed by long-term heart rate measurements

Lewis G. Halsey, Jonathan A. Green, Sean D. Twiss, Walter Arnold, Sarah J. Burthe, Patrick J. Butler, Steve J. Cooke, David Gremillet, Thomas Ruf, Olivia Hicks, Katarzyna J. Minta, Tanya S. Prystay, Claudia A.F. Wascher, Vincent Careau, Steven J Cooke, Tania S Prystay & Claudia AF Wascher
1) Animals are expected to be judicious in the use of the energy they gain due to the costs and limits associated with its intake. The management of energy expenditure (EE) exhibited by animals has previously been considered in terms of three patterns: the constrained, independent and performance patterns of energy management. These patterns can be interpreted by regressing daily EE against maintenance EE measured over extended periods. From the multiple studies on this topic,...

Data from: Continent‐scale phenotype mapping using citizen scientists’ photographs

Jonathan P. Drury, Morgan Barnes, Ann E. Finneran, Maddie Harris & Gregory F. Grether
Field investigations of phenotypic variation in free‐living organisms are often limited in scope owing to time and funding constraints. By collaborating with online communities of amateur naturalists, investigators can greatly increase the amount and diversity of phenotypic data in their analyses while simultaneously engaging with a public audience. Here, we present a method for quantifying phenotypes of individual organisms in citizen scientists’ photographs. We then show that our protocol for measuring wing phenotypes from photographs...

Energetic limits: Defining the bounds and trade-offs of successful energy management in a capital breeder

Courtney Shuert, Lewis Halsey, Patrick Pomeroy & Sean Twiss
1. Judicious management of energy can be invaluable for animal survival and reproductive success. Capital breeding mammals typically transfer energy to their young at extremely high rates while undergoing prolonged fasting, making lactation a tremendously energy demanding period. Effective management of the competing demands of the mother’s energy needs and those of her offspring is presumably fundamental to maximising lifetime reproductive success. 2. How does the mother maximise her chances of successfully rearing her pup,...

Data from: The contemporary distribution of Trypanosoma cruzi infection in humans, alternative hosts and vectors

Annie J. Browne, Carlos A. Guerra, Renato Vieira Alves, Veruska Maia Da Costa, Anne L. Wilson, David M. Pigott, Simon I. Hay, Steve W. Lindsay, Nick Golding & Catherine L. Moyes
Chagas is a potentially fatal chronic disease affecting large numbers of people across the Americas and exported throughout the world through human population movement. It is caused by the Trypanosoma cruzi parasite, which is transmitted by triatomine vectors to humans and a wide range of alternative host species. The database described here was compiled to allow the risk of vectorial transmission to humans to be mapped using geospatial models. The database collates all available records,...

Data from: Rapid and dynamic alternative splicing impacts the Arabidopsis cold response transcriptome

Cristiane P. G. Calixto, Wenbin Guo, Allan B. James, Nikoleta A. Tzioutziou, Juan C. Entizne, Paige E. Panter, Heather Knight, Hugh Nimmo, Runxuan Zhang & John W. S. Brown
Plants have adapted to tolerate and survive constantly changing environmental conditions by re-programming gene expression. The dynamics of the contribution of alternative splicing (AS) to stress responses are unknown. RNA-sequencing of a time-series of Arabidopsis thaliana plants exposed to cold determines the timing of significant AS changes. This shows a massive and rapid AS response with coincident waves of transcriptional and AS activity occurring in the first few hours of temperature reduction, and further AS...

Data from: Alien and native plant establishment in grassland communities is more strongly affected by disturbance than above- and below-ground enemies

Gregor Müller, Lena Horstmeyer, Tilman Rönneburg, Mark Van Kleunen & Wayne Dawson
Understanding the factors that drive commonness and rarity of plant species and whether these factors differ for alien and native species are key questions in ecology. If a species is to become common in a community, incoming propagules must first be able to establish. The latter could be determined by competition with resident plants, the impacts of herbivores and soil biota, or a combination of these factors. We aimed to tease apart the roles that...

Data from: Phenotypic and genetic divergence among harbour porpoise populations associated with habitat regions in the North Sea and adjacent seas.

Carlos De Luna Lopez, Simon J. Goodman, Oliver Thatcher, Paul D. Jepson, Liselotte Andersen, Krystal Tolley & Alan R. Hoelzel
Determining the mechanisms that generate population structure is essential to the understanding of speciation and the evolution of biodiversity. Here, we investigate a geographic range that transects two habitat gradients, the North Sea to North Atlantic transition, and the temperate to sub-polar regions. We studied the harbour porpoise (Phocoena phocoena), a small odontocete inhabiting both sub-polar and temperate waters. To assess differentiation among putative populations we measured morphological variation at cranial traits (N=462 individuals) and...

Data from: Geographical variation in species' population responses to changes in temperature and precipitation

James W. Pearce-Higgins, Nancy Ockendon, David J. Baker, Jamie Carr, Elizabeth C. White, Rosamunde E. A. Almond, Tatsuya Amano, Esther Bertram, Richard B. Bradbury, Cassie Bradley, Stuart H. M. Butchart, Nathalie Doswald, Wendy Foden, David J. C. Gill, Rhys E. Green, William J. Sutherland & Edmund V. J. Tanner
Despite increasing concerns about the vulnerability of species’ populations to climate change, there has been little overall synthesis of how individual population responses to variation in climate differ between taxa, with trophic level or geographically. To address this, we extracted data from 132 long-term (≥20 years) studies of population responses to temperature and precipitation covering 236 animal and plant species across terrestrial and freshwater habitats. Temperature tended to have a greater overall impact on populations...

Data from: Freezer on, lights off! Environmental effects on activity rhythms of fish in the Arctic

Kate L. Hawley, Carolyn M. Rosten, Thrond O. Haugen, Guttorm Christensen & Martyn C. Lucas
Polar regions are characterized by acute seasonal changes in the environment, with organisms inhabiting these regions lacking diel photoperiodic information for parts of the year. We present, to our knowledge, the first high-resolution analysis of diel and seasonal activity of free-living fishes in polar waters (74°N), subject to extreme variation in photoperiod, temperature and food availability. Using biotelemetry, we tracked two sympatric ecomorphs of lake-dwelling Arctic charr (Salvelinus alpinus n = 23) over an annual...

RNA-seq of Arabidopsis root growth responses to mechanical impedance

Keith Lindsey, Amy Jacobsen, Jian Xu, Jennifer Topping & George Jervis
1. The growth and development of root systems, essential for plant performance, is influenced by mechanical properties of the substrate in which the plants grow. Mechanical impedance, such as by compacted soil, can reduce root elongation and limit crop productivity. 2. To understand better the mechanisms involved in plant root responses to mechanical impedance stress, we investigated changes in the root transcriptome and hormone signalling responses of Arabidopsis to artificial root barrier systems in vitro....

Data from: Global vegetation patterns of the past 140,000 years

Judy Allen, Matthew Forrest, Thomas Hickler, Joy Singarayer, Paul Valdes & Brian Huntley
Aim Insight into global biome responses to climatic and other environmental changes is essential to address key questions about past and future impacts of such changes. By simulating global biome patterns 140 ka to present we aimed to address important questions about biome changes during this interval. Location Global. Taxon Plantae. Methods Using the LPJ-GUESS dynamic global vegetation model, we made 89 simulations driven using ice-core atmospheric CO2 concentrations, Earth’s obliquity, and outputs from a...

Permian–Triassic phylogenetic and morphologic evolution of rhynchonellide brachiopods

Zhen Guo, Zhong-Qiang Chen, A. T. Harper David & Yuangeng Huang
The Rhynchonellida is a major group of brachiopods that survived the “big five” mass extinctions and flourished after the Permian-Triassic (P-Tr) crisis. However, phylogenetic and character evolution in the Rhynchonellida across the P-Tr transition is poorly understood. In view of the widespread homoplasy across this order, we employ a tip-dated Bayesian analysis to reconstruct phylogenetic relationships for Late Permian–Triassic rhynchonellides. The same data were also analyzed using three other methods: undated Bayesian, equal-weighting, and implied-weighting...

Global maps of current (1979-2013) and future (2061-2080) habitat suitability probability for 1,485 European endemic plant species

Robin Pouteau, Idoia Biurrun, Caroline Brunel, Milan Chytrý, Wayne Dawson, Franz Essl, Trevor Fristoe, Rense Haveman, Carsten Hobohm, Florian Jansen, Holger Kreft, Jonathan Lenoir, Bernd Lenzner, Carsten Meyer, Jesper Erenskjold Moeslund, Jan Pergl, Petr Pyšek, Jens-Christian Svenning, Wilfried Thuiller, Patrick Weigelt, Thomas Wohlgemuth, Qiang Yang & Mark Van Kleunen
Aims: The rapid increase in the number of species that have naturalized beyond their native range is among the most apparent features of the Anthropocene. How alien species will respond to other processes of future global changes is an emerging concern and remains largely misunderstood. We therefore ask whether naturalized species will respond to climate and land-use change differently than those species not yet naturalized anywhere in the world. Location: Global Methods: We investigated future...

Foraging in fear: spatial variation in range use, vigilance, and perceived risk in Chacma baboons (Papio ursinus)

Alec Ayers, Andrew Allan & Russell Hill
Spatial variation in predation risk can lead to behavioural modifications including increased vigilance and avoidance. Coined the landscape of fear, previous studies have suggested that an animal’s spatial perception of risk is the most critical landscape within their environment. Few studies have integrated the landscape of fear with spatial measures of risk and assessments of resource availability within a single analytical framework. We assessed whether long-term space use in chacma baboons was influenced by the...

Data from: SNP discovery in non-model organisms: strand-bias and base-substitution errors reduce conversion rates

Anders Gonçalves Da Silva, William Barendse, James W. Kijas, Wes C. Barris, Sean McWilliam, Rowan J. Bunch, Russell McCulloch, Blair Harrison, A. Rus Hoelzel, Phillip R. England & Russell McCullough
Single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) have become the marker of choice for genetic studies in organisms of conservation, commercial or biological interest. Most SNP discovery projects in nonmodel organisms apply a strategy for identifying putative SNPs based on filtering rules that account for random sequencing errors. Here, we analyse data used to develop 4723 novel SNPs for the commercially important deep-sea fish, orange roughy (Hoplostethus atlanticus), to assess the impact of not accounting for systematic sequencing...

Data from: The past ecology of Abies alba provides new perspectives on future responses of silver fir forests to global warming

Willy Tinner, Daniele Colombaroli, Oliver Heiri, Paul Henne, Marco Steinacher, Johanna Untenecker, Elisa Vescovi, Judy Allen, Gabriele Carraro, Marco Conedera, Fortunat Joos, André Lotter, Jürg Luterbacher, Stephanie Samartin & Verushka Valsecchi
Paleoecology can provide valuable insights into the ecology of species that complement observation and experiment-based assessments of climate-impact dynamics. New paleoecological records (e.g. pollen, macrofossils) from the Italian Peninsula suggest a much wider climatic niche of the important European tree species Abies alba (silver fir) than observed in its present spatial range. To explore this discrepancy between current and past distribution we analyse climatic data (e.g. temperature, precipitation, frost, humidity, sunshine) and vegetation-independent paleoclimatic reconstructions...

Data from: Contrasting population genetic structure among freshwater-resident and anadromous lampreys: the role of demographic history, differential dispersal, and anthropogenic barriers to movement.

Fiona S. A. Bracken, A. Rus Hoelzel, John B. Hume & Martyn C. Lucas
The tendency of many species to abandon migration remains a poorly understood aspect of evolutionary biology that may play an important role in promoting species radiation by both allopatric and sympatric mechanisms. Anadromy inherently offers an opportunity for the colonization of freshwater environments, and the shift from an anadromous to a wholly freshwater life history has occurred in many families of fishes. Freshwater-resident forms have arisen repeatedly among lampreys (within the Petromyzontidae and Mordaciidae), and...

Data from: Seascape genetics along environmental gradients in the Arabian Peninsula: insights from ddRAD sequencing of anemonefishes

Pablo Saenz-Agudelo, Joseph D. DiBattista, Marek J. Piatek, Michelle R. Gaither, Hugo B. Harrison, Gerrit B. Nanninga & Michael L. Berumen
Understanding the processes that shape patterns of genetic structure across space is a central aim of landscape genetics. However, it remains unclear how geographic features and environmental variables shape gene flow, particularly for marine species in large complex seascapes. Here, we evaluated the genomic composition of the two-band anemonefish Amphiprion bicinctus across its entire geographic range in the Red Sea and Gulf of Aden, as well as its close relative, Amphiprion omanensis endemic to the...

Data from: Cultural traditions across a migratory network shape the genetic structure of southern right whales around Australia and New Zealand

E. L. Carroll, C. S. Baker, M. Watson, R. Alderman, J. Bannister, O. E. Gaggiotti, D. R. Gröcke, N. Patenaude & R. Harcourt
Fidelity to migratory destinations is an important driver of connectivity in marine and avian species. Here we assess the role of maternally directed learning of migratory habitats, or migratory culture, on the population structure of the endangered Australian and New Zealand southern right whale. Using DNA profiles, comprising mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) haplotypes (500 bp), microsatellite genotypes (17 loci) and sex from 128 individually-identified whales, we find significant differentiation among winter calving grounds based on both...

Data from: Risk of exposure to potential vector mosquitoes for rural workers in Northern Lao PDR

Julie-Anne A. Tangena, Phoutmany Thammavong, Steve W. Lindsay & Paul T. Brey
Background: One major consequence of economic development in South-East Asia has been a rapid expansion of rubber plantations, in which outbreaks of dengue and malaria have occurred. Here we explored the difference in risk of exposure to potential dengue, Japanese encephalitis (JE), and malaria vectors between rubber workers and those engaged in traditional forest activities in northern Laos PDR. Methodology/Principal findings: Adult mosquitoes were collected for nine months in secondary forests, mature and immature rubber...

Data from: Population dynamics and threats to an apex predator outside protected areas: implications for carnivore management

Samual T. Williams, Kathryn S. Williams, Bradley P. Lewis & Russell A. Hill
Data on the population dynamics and threats to large carnivores are vital to conservation efforts, but these are hampered by a paucity of studies. For some species, such as the leopard (Panthera pardus), there is such uncertainty in population trends that leopard trophy hunting has been banned in South Africa since 2016 while further data on leopard abundance are collected. We present one of the first assessments of leopard population dynamics, and identify the key...

Data from: Rhenium uptake and distribution in phaeophyceae macroalgae, Fucus vesiculosus

Blanca Racionero-Gómez, Adam D. Sproson, Dave Selby, Darren R. Gröcke, Hilary Redden & H. Christopher Greenwell
Owing to Rhenium (Re) having no known biological role, it is not fully understood how Re is concentrated in oil kerogens. A commonly held assumption is that Re is incorporated into decomposing biomass under reducing conditions. However, living macroalgae also concentrate Re to several orders of magnitude greater than that of seawater. This study uses Fucus vesiculosus to assess Re uptake and its subsequent localization in the biomass. It is demonstrated that the Re abundance...

Registration Year

  • 2021
    22
  • 2020
    20
  • 2019
    3
  • 2018
    14
  • 2017
    16
  • 2016
    12
  • 2015
    8
  • 2014
    5
  • 2013
    7
  • 2012
    3

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    109
  • Text
    2
  • Book
    1
  • Software
    1

Affiliations

  • Durham University
    113
  • University of Konstanz
    10
  • University of Oxford
    6
  • University of Cambridge
    5
  • German Center for Integrative Biodiversity Research
    5
  • Senckenberg Biodiversity and Climate Research Centre
    4
  • University of Göttingen
    4
  • University of Leeds
    4
  • University of Vienna
    4
  • University of Pretoria
    3