7 Works

Data from: Divergent evolutionary processes associated with colonization of offshore islands

Natália Martínková, Ross Barnett, Thomas Cucchi, Rahel Struchen, Marine Pascal, Michel Pascal, Martin C. Fischer, Thomas Higham, Selina Brace, Simon Y. W. Ho, Jean-Pierre Quéré, Paul O'Higgins, Laurent Excoffier, Gerald Heckel, A. Rus Hoelzel, Keith M. Dobney & Jeremy B. Searle
Oceanic islands have been a test ground for evolutionary theory, but here, we focus on the possibilities for evolutionary study created by offshore islands. These can be colonized through various means and by a wide range of species, including those with low dispersal capabilities. We use morphology, modern and ancient sequences of cytochrome b (cytb) and microsatellite genotypes to examine colonization history and evolutionary change associated with occupation of the Orkney archipelago by the common...

Soil map of the Moor House National Nature Reserve

G.A.L. Johnson
This is a digital soil map of the Moor House - Upper Teesdale National Nature Reserve. Mapped polygons represent a range of soil types. The site lies in the North Pennine uplands of England and has an area of 74 km2. It is England's highest and largest terrestrial National Nature Reserve (NNR), a UNESCO Biosphere Reserve and a European Special Protection Area. Habitats include exposed summits, extensive blanket peatlands, upland grasslands, pastures, hay meadows and...

Data from: Phylogeography and population history of Leopardus guigna, the smallest American felid

Constanza Napolitano, Warren E. Johnson, Jim Sanderson, Stephen J. O'Brien, Rus Hoelzel, Rachel Freer, Nigel Dunstone, Kermit Ritland, Carol E. Ritland, Elie Poulin & A. Rus Hoelzel
The guigna (Leopardus guigna) is the smallest and most-restricted New World cat species, inhabiting only around 160,000 km2 of temperate rain forests in southern South America and is currently threatened by habitat loss, fragmentation and human persecution. We investigated phylogeographic patterns of genetic diversity, demographic history and barriers to gene flow with 116 individuals sampled across the species geographic range by analyzing 1,798 base pairs of the mtDNA (496 bp HVSI region, 720 bp NADH-5...

Data from: Recent diversification of a marine genus (Tursiops spp.) tracks habitat preference and environmental change

Andre E. Moura, Sandra C. A. Nielsen, Julia T. Vilstrup, Jose Victor Moreno-Mayar, Marcus Thomas P. Gilbert, Howard Gray, Ada Natoli, Luciana Möller, Alan Rus Hoelzel & Howard W. I. Gray
Understanding the evolution of diversity and the resulting systematics in marine systems is confounded by the lack of clear boundaries in oceanic habitats, especially for highly mobile species like marine mammals. Dolphin populations and sibling species often show differentiation between coastal and offshore habitats, similar to the pelagic/littoral or benthic differentiation seen for some species of fish. Here we test the hypothesis that lineages within the polytypic genus Tursiops track past changes in the environment...

Data from: Homing pigeons respond to time-compensated solar cues even in sight of the loft

Chris Armstrong, Helen Wilkinson, Jessica Meade, Dora Biro, Robin Freeman & Tim Guilford
The sun has long been thought to guide bird navigation as the second step in a two-stage process, in which determining position using a map is followed by course setting using a compass, both over unfamiliar and familiar terrain. The animal’s endogenous clock time-compensates the solar compass for the sun’s apparent movement throughout the day, and this allows predictable deflections in orientation to test for the compass’ influence using clock-shift manipulations. To examine the influence...

Data from: Patterns of population structure for inshore bottlenose dolphins along the eastern United States

Vince P. Richards, Thomas W. Greig, Patricia A. Fair, Stephen D. McCulloch, Christine Politz, Ada Natoli, Carlos A. Driscoll, A. Russell Hoelzel, Victor David, Gregory D. Bossart & Jose V. Lopez
Globally distributed, the bottlenose dolphin (Tursiops truncatus) is found in a range of offshore and coastal habitats. Using 15 microsatellite loci and mtDNA control region sequences, we investigated patterns of genetic differentiation among putative populations along the eastern US shoreline (the Indian River Lagoon, Florida, and Charleston Harbor, South Carolina) (microsatellite analyses: n = 125, mtDNA analyses: n = 132). We further utilized the mtDNA to compare these populations with those from the Northwest Atlantic,...

Data from: The past ecology of Abies alba provides new perspectives on future responses of silver fir forests to global warming

Willy Tinner, Daniele Colombaroli, Oliver Heiri, Paul Henne, Marco Steinacher, Johanna Untenecker, Elisa Vescovi, Judy Allen, Gabriele Carraro, Marco Conedera, Fortunat Joos, André Lotter, Jürg Luterbacher, Stephanie Samartin & Verushka Valsecchi
Paleoecology can provide valuable insights into the ecology of species that complement observation and experiment-based assessments of climate-impact dynamics. New paleoecological records (e.g. pollen, macrofossils) from the Italian Peninsula suggest a much wider climatic niche of the important European tree species Abies alba (silver fir) than observed in its present spatial range. To explore this discrepancy between current and past distribution we analyse climatic data (e.g. temperature, precipitation, frost, humidity, sunshine) and vegetation-independent paleoclimatic reconstructions...

Registration Year

  • 2013
    7

Resource Types

  • Dataset
    7

Affiliations

  • Durham University
    7
  • University of Bern
    2
  • National Cancer Institute
    2
  • Cornell University
    2
  • Swiss Institute of Bioinformatics
    1
  • UK Centre for Ecology & Hydrology
    1
  • University of Aberdeen
    1
  • Natural History Museum
    1
  • United Arab Emirates University
    1
  • French National Institute for Agricultural Research
    1