12 Works

Hidden treasure of the Gobi: understanding how water limits range use of khulan in the Mongolian Gobi

John C. Payne, Bayarbaatar Buuveibaatar, Diana E. Bowler, Kirk A. Olson, Chris Walzer & Petra Kaczensky
Most large herbivores in arid landscapes need to drink which constrains their movements and makes them vulnerable to disturbance. Asiatic wild ass or khulan (Equus hemionus) were widespread and abundant throughout the arid landscapes of Central Asia and Mongolia, but have undergone dramatic population declines and range constrictions; denying khulan access to water is believed to have played a major role. Mongolia’s South Gobi Region now houses the world largest remaining khulan population, but is...

Vorstudie für das Klima- und Energiefondsprojekt NH3-PM-AQ für die Steiermark

Gunther Schauberger & Barbara Scherllin-Pirscher

Vorstudie für das Klima- und Energiefondsprojekt NH3-PM-AQ für das Burgenland

Gunther Schauberger & Barbara Scherllin-Pirscher

Vorstudie für das Klima- und Energiefondsprojekt NH3-PM-AQ für Niederösterreich

Gunther Schauberger & Barbara Scherllin-Pirscher

Nucleotide diversity of functionally different groups of immune response genes in Old World camels based on newly annotated and reference-guided assemblies

Jean Elbers, Sara Lado, Mark Rogers, José Melo-Ferreira, Jukka Corander, Petr Horin, Pamela Burger & Adiya Yadamsuren
Background Immune-response (IR) genes have an important role in the defense against highly variable pathogens, and therefore, genetic diversity in these genomic regions is essential for species’ survival and adaptation. Although current genome assemblies from Old World camelids are very useful for investigating genome-wide diversity, demography and population structure, they have inconsistencies and gaps that limit analyses at local genomic scales. Improved and more accurate genome assemblies and annotations are needed to study complex genomic...

Latitudinal variation in climate-associated genes imperils range-edge populations

Steve Smith, Chris Brauer, Minami Sasaki, Peter Unmack, Gilles Guillot, Martin Laporte, Louis Bernatchez & Luciano Beheregaray
The ecological impacts of increasing global temperatures are evident in most ecosystems on Earth, but our understanding of how climatic variation influences natural selection and adaptive resilience across latitudes is still largely unknown. Latitudinal gradients allow testing general ecosystem-level theories relevant to climatic adaptation. We assessed differences in adaptive diversity of populations along a latitudinal region spanning highly variable temperate to subtropical climates. We generated and integrated large-scale information from environmental mapping, phenotypic variation and...

Fitness effects for Ace insecticide resistance mutations are determined by ambient temperature

Anna Maria Langmüller, Viola Nolte, Ruwansha Galagedara, Rodolphe Poupardin, Marlies Dolezal & Christian Schlötterer
Background Insect pest control programs often use periods of insecticide treatment with intermittent breaks, to prevent fixing of mutations conferring insecticide resistance. Such mutations are typically costly in an insecticide free environment, and their frequency is determined by the balance between insecticide treatment and cost of resistance. Ace, a key gene in neuronal signaling, is a prominent target of many insecticides and across several species three amino acid replacements (I161V, G265A and F330Y) provide resistance...

Data from: Genome-wide diversity and global migration patterns in dromedaries follow ancient caravan routes

Sara Lado, Jean-Pierre Elbers, Naruya Saitou, Faisal Almathen, Angela Doskocil, Davide Scaglione, Emiliano Trucchi, Mohammad Hossein Banabazi, Elena Ciani & Pamela Anna Burger
Dromedaries have been essential for the prosperity of civilizations in arid environments and the dispersal of humans, goods and cultures along ancient, cross-continental trading routes. With increasing desertification their importance as livestock species is rising rapidly, but little is known about their genome-wide diversity and demographic history. As previous studies using a limited amount of nuclear markers have shown weak phylogeographic structure, here, we adopted a genome-wide approach and detected fine-scale population differentiation in dromedaries...

Glucocorticoids link forest type to local abundance in tropical birds

Simone Messina, David Edwards, Valeria Marasco, Virginie Canoine, Cindy Cosset, Suzanne Tomassi, Suzan Benedick, Marcel Eens & David Costantini
Selective logging is a major driver of environmental changes in the tropics. Recently, there has been increasing interest in understanding which traits make bird species resilient or vulnerable to such changes. Physiological stress mediated by the steroid hormone corticosterone (CORT) might underlie changes in local abundance of species because it regulates a range of body functions and behaviours to maintain homeostasis in changing environments. We conducted a three-year study to assess: (i) the variation in...

Secondary evolve and re-sequencing: an experimental confirmation of putative selection targets without phenotyping

Claire Burny, Viola Nolte, Marlies Dolezal, Christian Schlötterer & Pierre Nouhaud
Evolve and re-sequencing (E&R) studies investigate the genomic responses of adaptation during experimental evolution. Because replicate populations evolve in the same controlled environment, consistent responses to selection across replicates are frequently used to identify reliable candidate regions that underlie adaptation to a new environment. However, recent work demonstrated that selection signatures can be restricted to one or a few replicate(s) only. These selection signatures frequently have a weak statistical support, and given the difficulties of...

Wild chimpanzees exhibit human-like aging of glucocorticoid regulation

Melissa Emery Thompson, Stephanie Fox, Andreas Berghaenel, Kris Sabbi, Sarah Phillips-Garcia, Drew Enigk, Emily Otali, Zarin Machanda, Richard Wrangham & Martin Muller
Cortisol, a key product of the stress response, has critical influences on degenerative aging in humans. In turn, cortisol production is affected by senescence of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis, leading to progressive dysregulation and increased cortisol exposure. These processes have been studied extensively in industrialized settings, but few comparative data are available from humans and closely-related species living in natural environments, where stressors are very different. Here, we examine age-related changes in urinary cortisol in...

The legacy of recurrent introgression during the radiation of hares

Mafalda S. Ferreira, Matthew R. Jones, Colin M. Callahan, Liliana Farelo, Zelalem Tolesa, Franz Suchentrunk, Pierre Boursot, L. Scott Mills, Paulo C. Alves, Jeffrey M. Good & José Melo-Ferreira
Hybridization may often be an important source of adaptive variation, but the extent and long-term impacts of introgression have seldom been evaluated in the phylogenetic context of a radiation. Hares (Lepus) represent a widespread mammalian radiation of 32 extant species characterized by striking ecological adaptations and recurrent admixture. To understand the relevance of introgressive hybridization during the diversification of Lepus, we analyzed whole exome sequences (61.7 Mb) from 15 species of hares (1- 4 individuals...

Registration Year

  • 2020
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Resource Types

  • Dataset
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  • Text
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Affiliations

  • University of Veterinary Medicine Vienna
    12
  • Central Institution for Meteorology and Geodynamics
    3
  • University of Porto
    2
  • University of Montana
    1
  • University of Antwerp
    1
  • King Faisal University
    1
  • Marche Polytechnic University
    1
  • International Prevention Research Institute
    1
  • Flinders University
    1
  • University of Oslo
    1