175 Works

From refugia to contact: pine processionary moth hybrid zone in a complex biogeographic setting

Kahraman İpekdal, Christian Burban, Laure Sauné, Andrea Battisti & Carole Kerdelhué
Contact zones occur at the crossroad between specific dispersal routes and are facilitated by biogeographic discontinuities. Here we focused on two Lepidoptera sister species that come in contact near the Turkish Straits System (TSS). We aimed to infer their phylogeographic histories in the Eastern Mediterranean and finely analyse their co-occurrence and hybridisation patterns in this biogeographical context. We used molecular mitochondrial and nuclear markers to study 224 individuals from 42 localities. We used discordances between...

Genomic footprints of recovery in the European bison

Tom Druet, Kamil Oleński, Laurence Flori, Amandine Bertrand, Wanda Olech, Malgorzata Tokarska, Stanislaw Kaminski & Mathieu Gautier
After extinction in the wild in the beginning of the twentieth century, the European bison has been successfully recovered in two distinct genetic lines from only twelve and seven captive founders. We here aimed at characterizing the levels of realized inbreeding in these two restored lines to provide empirical insights into the genomic footprints left by population recovery from a small number of founders. To that end, we genotyped 183 European bison born over the...

Data from: Variable outcomes of hybridization between declining Alosa alosa and Alosa fallax

Olivier Lepais, Laura Taillebois, Stephen Sabatino, Aurélie Manicki, Françoise Daverat & David José Nachon
Hybridization dynamics between co-occurring species in environments where human-mediated changes take place is important to quantify for furthering our understanding of human impacts on species evolution and for informing management. The allis shad Alosa alosa (Linnaeus, 1758) and twaite shad Alosa fallax (Lacépède, 1803), two clupeids sister species, have been severely impacted by human activities across Europe. The shrinkage of A. alosa distribution range along with the decline of the remaining populations’ abundance threaten its...

Opposite latitudinal patterns for bird and arthropod predation revealed in the experiments with differently colored artificial prey

Elena Zvereva, Bastien Castagneyrol, Tatiana Cornelissen, Anders Forsman, Juan Antonio Hernández-Agüero, Tero Klemola, Lucas Paolucci, Vicente Polo, Norma Salinas, K. Jurie Theron, Guorui Xu, Vitali Zverev & Mikhail Kozlov
The strength of biotic interactions is generally thought to increase towards the equator, but support for this hypothesis is contradictory. We explored whether predator attacks on artificial prey of eight different colours vary among climates and whether this variation affects the detection of latitudinal patterns in predation. The data set provides number of damage marks on each of 1320 plasticine caterpillars of eight different colours, which were attached to branches of woody plants and exposed...

Data from: Varroa destructor changes cuticular hydrocarbons to mimic its new host.

Zachary Y. Huang, Yves Le Conte, Jean-Philippe Christidès, Zhi Jiang Zeng, Maurice Roux & Anne-Genevieve Bagnères
Varroa destructor (Vd) is a honeybee ectoparasite. Its original host is the Asian honeybee, Apis cerana, but it has also become a severe, global threat to the European honeybee, Apis mellifera. Previous studies have shown that Varroa can mimic a host's cuticular hydrocarbons (HC), enabling the parasite to escape the hygienic behaviour of the host honeybees. By transferring mites between the two honeybee species, we further demonstrate that Vd is able to mimic the cuticular...

Data from: Diet quality in a wild grazer declines under the threat of an ambush predator

Florian Barnier, Marion Valeix, Patrick Duncan, Simon Chamaillé-Jammes, Philippe Barre, Andrew J. Loveridge, David W. Macdonald, Hervé Fritz & S. Chamaille-Jammes
Predators influence prey populations not only through predation itself, but also indirectly through prompting changes in prey behaviour. The behavioural adjustments of prey to predation risk may carry nutritional costs, but this has seldom been studied in the wild in large mammals. Here, we studied the effects of an ambush predator, the African lion (Panthera leo), on the diet quality of plains zebras (Equus quagga) in Hwange National Park, Zimbabwe. We combined information on movements...

Data from: How much would it cost to monitor farmland biodiversity in Europe?

Ilse R. Geijzendorffer, Stefano Targetti, Manuel K. Schneider, Dick J. Brus, Philippe Jeanneret, Robert H. G. Jongman, Martin Knotters, Davide Viaggi, Siyka Angelova, Michaela Arndorfer, Debra Bailey, Katalin Balzacs, András Báldim, Marion M. B. Bogers, Robert G.H. Bunce, Jean-Philippe Choisis, Peter Dennis, Sebastian Eiter, Wendy Fjellstad, Jürgen F. Friedel, Tiziano Gomiero, Arjan Griffioen, Max Kainz, Anikó Kovács-Hostyánszki, Gisela Lüscher … & András Báldi
To evaluate progress on political biodiversity objectives, biodiversity monitoring provides information on whether intended results are being achieved. Despite scientific proof that monitoring and evaluation increase the (cost) efficiency of policy measures, cost estimates for monitoring schemes are seldom available, hampering their inclusion in policy programme budgets. Empirical data collected from 12 case studies across Europe were used in a power analysis to estimate the number of farms that would need to be sampled per...

Data from: Is there still a French eating model? A taxonomy of eating behaviors in adults living in the Paris metropolitan area in 2010

Julien Riou, Thomas Lefevre, Isabelle Parizot, Anne Lhuissier & Pierre Chauvin
Background: Meal times in France still represent an important moment in everyday life. The model of three rigorously synchronized meals is still followed by a majority of people, while meal frequencies have flattened in other European or North-American countries. We aimed to examine the “French model” of eating behavior by identifying and characterizing distinct meal patterns. Methods: Analyses were based on data from the SIRS cohort, a representative survey of the adult population in the...

Data from: Single-nucleotide polymorphism discovery and validation in high-density SNP array for genetic analysis in European white oaks

Camille Lepoittevin, Catherine Bodénès, Emilie Chancerel, Laure Villate, Tiange Lang, Isabelle Lesur, Christophe Boury, François Ehrenmann, Diana Zelenika, Anne Boland, Céline Besse, Pauline Garnier-Géré, Christophe Plomion & Antoine Kremer
An Illumina Infinium SNP genotyping array was constructed for European white oaks. Six individuals of Quercus petraea and Q. robur were considered for SNP discovery using both previously obtained Sanger sequences across 676 gene regions (1371 in vitro SNPs) and Roche 454 technology sequences from 5112 contigs (6542 putative in silico SNPs). The 7913 SNPs were genotyped across the six parental individuals, full-sib progenies (one within each species and two interspecific crosses between Q. petraea...

Data from: Distribution and population structure of the anther smut fungus Microbotryum silenes-acaulis parasitizing an arctic-alpine plant

Britta Bueker, Chris Eberlein, Pierre Gladieux, Angela Schaefer, Alodie Snirc, Dominic Bennett, Dominik Begerow, Michael Hood, Tatiana Giraud & Dominic J. Bennett
Cold-adapted organisms with current arctic-alpine distributions have persisted during the last glaciation in multiple ice-free refugia, leaving footprints in their population structure that contrast with temperate plants and animals. However, pathogens that live within hosts having arctic-alpine distributions have been little studied. Here, we therefore investigated the geographical range and population structure of a fungus parasitizing an arctic-alpine plant. A total of 1437 herbarium specimens of the plant Silene acaulis were examined, and the anther...

Data from: Adaptation of a plant pathogen to partial host resistance: selection for greater aggressiveness in grapevine downy mildew

Chloé E. L. Delmas, Frédéric Fabre, Jérôme Jolivet, Isabelle D. Mazet, Sylvie Richart Cervera, Laurent Delière & François Delmotte
An understanding of the evolution of pathogen quantitative traits in response to host selective pressures is essential for the development of durable management strategies for resistant crops. However, we still lack experimental data on the effects of partial host resistance on multiple phenotypic traits (aggressiveness) and evolutionary strategies in pathogens. We performed a cross-inoculation experiment with four grapevine hosts and 103 isolates of grapevine downy mildew (Plasmopara viticola) sampled from susceptible and partially resistant grapevine...

Data from: High-throughput sequencing of transposable element insertions suggests adaptive evolution of the invasive Asian Tiger Mosquito towards temperate environments

Clément Goubert, Hélène Henri, Guillaume Minard, Claire Valiente Moro, Patrick Mavingui, Cristina Vieira & Matthieu Boulesteix
Invasive species represent unique opportunities to evaluate the role of local adaptation during colonization of new environments. Among these species, the Asian tiger mosquito, Aedes albopictus, is a threatening vector of several human viral diseases, including dengue and chikungunya, and raises concerns about the Zika fever. Its broad presence in both temperate and tropical environments has been considered the reflection of great “ecological plasticity.” However, no study has been conducted to assess the role of...

Data from: Habitat filtering determines the functional niche occupancy of plant communities worldwide

Yuanzhi Li, Bill Shipley, Jodi N. Price, Vinícius De L. Dantas, Riin Tamme, Mark Westoby, Andrew Siefert, Brandon S. Schamp, Marko J. Spasojevic, Vincent Jung, Daniel C. Laughlin, Sarah J. Richardson, Yoann Le Bagousse-Pinguet, Christian Schöb, Antonio Gazol, Honor C. Prentice, Nicolas Gross, Jacob Overton, Marcus V. Cianciaruso, Frédérique Louault, Chiho Kamiyama, Tohru Nakashizuka, Kouki Hikosaka, Takehiro Sasaki, Masatoshi Katabuchi … & Marco A. Batalha
How the patterns of niche occupancy vary from species-poor to species-rich communities is a fundamental question in ecology that has a central bearing on the processes that drive patterns of biodiversity. As species richness increases, habitat filtering should constrain the expansion of total niche volume, while limiting similarity should restrict the degree of niche overlap between species. Here, by explicitly incorporating intraspecific trait variability, we investigate the relationship between functional niche occupancy and species richness...

Data from: Winter warming effects on tundra shrub performance are species-specific and dependent on spring conditions

Eveline J. Krab, Jonas Rönnefarth, Marina Becher, Gesche Blume-Werry, Frida Keuper, Jonatan Klaminder, Juergen Kreyling, Kobayashi Makoto, Ann Milbau, Ellen Dorrepaal & Jonas Roennefarth
1. Climate change driven increases in winter temperatures positively affect conditions for shrub growth in arctic tundra by decreasing plant frost damage and stimulation of nutrient availability. However, the extent to which shrubs may benefit from these conditions may be strongly dependent on the following spring climate. Species-specific differences in phenology and spring frost sensitivity likely affect shrub growth responses to warming. Additionally, effects of changes in winter and spring climate may differ over small...

Data from: Using sensitivity analysis to identify key factors for the propagation of a plant epidemic

Loup Rimbaud, Claude Bruchou, Sylvie Dallot, David R.J. Pleydell, Emmanuel Jacquot, Samuel Soubeyrand, Gaël Thébaud & David R. J. Pleydell
Identifying the key factors underlying the spread of a disease is an essential but challenging prerequisite to design management strategies. To tackle this issue, we propose an approach based on sensitivity analyses of a spatiotemporal stochastic model simulating the spread of a plant epidemic. This work is motivated by the spread of sharka, caused by Plum pox virus, in a real landscape. We first carried out a broad-range sensitivity analysis, ignoring any prior information on...

Data from: Contemporary variations of immune responsiveness during range expansion of two invasive rodents in Senegal

Christophe Diagne, Emmanuelle Gilot-Fromont, Stéphane Cornet, Laëtitia Husse, Souleymane Doucouré, Ambroise Dalecky, Khalilou Bâ, Mamadou Kane, Youssoupha Niang, Mamoudou Diallo, Aliou Sow, Odile Fossati-Gaschignard, Sylvain Piry, Emmaneulle Artige, Mbacké Sembène, Carine Brouat, Nathalie Charbonnel & Emmanuelle Artige
Biological invasions provide unique opportunities for studying life history trait changes over contemporary time scales. As spatial spread may be related to changes in parasite communities, several hypotheses (such as the evolution of increased competitive ability (EICA) or EICA-refined hypotheses) suggest immune changes in invasive species along invasion gradients. Although native hosts may be subject to similar changes in parasite selection pressures, their immune responses have been rarely investigated in invasion contexts. In this study,...

Data from: Plant interactions as biotic drivers of plasticity in leaf litter traits and decomposability of Quercus petraea

Ludovic Henneron, Matthieu Chauvat, Frédéric Archaux, Marthe Akpa-Vinceslas, Fabrice Bureau, Yann Dumas, Laurent Mignot, François Ningre, Sandrine Perret, Claudine Richter, Philippe Balandier & Michael Aubert
The importance of plant litter traits and decomposability for nutrient cycling processes and plant community dynamics through plant-litter-soil feedbacks has been largely emphasized. However, the role of biotic interactions as drivers of intraspecific variability in litter traits remains surprisingly little studied. In this study, we used a large-scale, multi-site network of long-term tree removal experiments manipulating the abundance of a foundation tree species, i.e. Quercus petraea, to assess how plant interactions control intraspecific variation in...

Data from: New insights into the history of domesticated and wild apricots and its contribution to Plum pox virus resistance

Stéphane Decroocq, Amandine Cornille, David Tricon, Sevda Babayeva, Aurélie Chague, Jean-Philippe Eyquard, Raul Karychev, Svetlana Dolgikh, Tatiana Kostritsyna, Shuo Liu, Weisheng Liu, Wenjuan Geng, Kang Liao, Bayram Asma, Zeynal Akparov, Tatiana Giraud, Veronique Decroocq & Bayram M. Asma
Studying domesticated species and their wild relatives allows understanding of the mechanisms of population divergence and adaptation, and identifying valuable genetic resources. Apricot is an important fruit in the Northern hemisphere, where it is threatened by the Plum pox virus (PPV), causing the sharka disease. The histories of apricot domestication and of its resistance to sharka are however still poorly understood. We used 18 microsatellite markers to genotype a collection of 230 wild trees from...

Data from: Development of genomic resources for Nothofagus species using next-generation sequencing data

Veronica Andrea El Mujtar, Leonardo Ariel Gallo, Lang Tiange & Pauline Garnier-Gere
Using next-generation sequencing, we developed the first whole-genome resources for two hybridizing Nothofagus species of the Patagonian forests that crucially lack genomic data, despite their ecological and industrial value. A de novo assembly strategy combining base quality control and optimization of the putative chloroplast gene map yielded ~32 000 contigs from 43% of the reads produced. With 12.5% of assembled reads, we covered ~96% of the chloroplast genome and ~70% of the mitochondrial gene content,...

Data from: Stronger spatial genetic structure in recolonized areas than in refugia in the European beech

Guillaume De Lafontaine, Alexis Ducousso, Sophie Lefèvre, Elodie Magnanou & Rémy J. Petit
Extant rear-edge populations located in former glacial refugia remain understudied despite their high conservation value. These populations should have experienced strong genetic drift due to their small size and long isolation. Moreover, the prolonged action of isolation-by-distance in refugial areas should result in stronger regional spatial genetic structure than in recolonized areas, but empirical tests of this prediction are scarce. To fill this gap, we first used a set of 16 microsatellite markers to investigate...

Data from: Androgenesis is a maternal trait in the invasive ant Wasmannia auropunctata

Olivier Rey, Benoit Facon, Julien Foucaud, Anne Loiseau & Arnaud Estoup
Androgenesis is the production of an offspring containing exclusively the nuclear genome of the fathering male, via the maternal eggs. This unusual mating system is generally considered as a male trait, giving to androgenetic males a substantial fitness advantage over their sexually reproducing relatives. We here provide the first empirical study of the evolutionary outcomes of androgenesis in a haplo-diploid organism: the invasive ant Wasmannia auropunctata. Some of the populations of this species have a...

Data from: Development of SNP genotyping arrays in two shellfish species

Sylvie Lapègue, Estelle Harrang, Serge Heurtebise, Emilie Flahauw, Cécile Donnadieu, Philippe Gayral, Marion Ballenghien, Lucie Genestout, Laetitia Barbotte, Rachid Mahla, Pierrick Haffray & Christophe Klopp
Use of SNPs has been favored due to their abundance in plant and animal genomes, accompanied by the falling cost and rising throughput capacity for detection and genotyping. Here, we present in vitro (obtained from targeted sequencing) and in silico discovery of SNPs, and the design of medium-throughput genotyping arrays for two oyster species, the Pacific oyster, Crassostrea gigas, and European flat oyster, Ostrea edulis. Two sets of 384 SNP markers were designed for two...

Data from: A cost-and-time effective procedure to develop SNP markers for multiple species: a support for community genetics

Chrystelle Delord, Gilles Lassalle, Adrien Oger, Dominique Barloy, Marie-Agnes Coutellec, Adline Delcamp, Guillaume Evanno, Clemence Genthon, Erwan Guichoux, Pierre-Yves Le Bail, Patricia Le Quilliec, Guillaume Longin, Olivier Lorvelec, Marie Massot, Elodie Reveillac, Raphaelle Rinaldo, Jean-Marc Roussel, Regis Vigouroux, Sophie Launey & Eric J. Petit
1.Multi‐species population genetics is an emerging field that provides insight relevant to conservation biology and community ecology. However, to date, this approach is limited to species with available genetic resources. The use of thousands of single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) markers developed from recent genotyping‐by‐sequencing (GBS) technologies is a roadmap for the study of non‐model species, but remains cost prohibitive when several, distantly related species are involved. 2.We aimed to overcome this issue by using a...

Data from: Postglacial climate changes and rise of three ecotypes of harbor porpoises, Phocoena phocoena, in western Palearctic waters

Michaël C. Fontaine, Kathleen Roland, Isabelle Calves, Frederic Austerlitz, Friso P. Palstra, Krystal A. Tolley, Sean Ryan, Marisa Ferreira, Thierry Jauniaux, Angela Llavona, Bayram Öztürk, Ayaka A. Öztürk, Vincent Ridoux, Emer Rogan, Ursula Siebert, Marina Sequeira, Gísli A. Vikingsson, Asunción Borrell, Johan R. Michaux & Alex Aguilar
Despite no obvious barriers to gene flow in the marine realm, environmental variation and ecological specializations can lead to genetic differentiation in highly mobile predators. Here, we investigated the genetic structure of the harbor porpoise over the entire species distribution range in western Palearctic waters. Combined analyses of ten microsatellite loci and a 5,085 bases-pairs portion of the mitochondrial genome revealed the existence of three ecotypes, equally divergent at the mitochondrial genome, distributed in the...

Data from: The evolution of chemical defenses along invasion routes: Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera) as a case study

Alexandra Magro, Felipe Ramon-Portugal, Benoît Facon, Christine Ducamp & Jean-Louis Hemptinne
The Evolution of Increased Competitive Ability (EICA) hypothesis (Blossey & Nötzold, 1995) postulates that escaping from coevolved enemies increases invaders fitness by energy reallocation from defenses and immunity to growth and reproduction. In this context, we evaluated the evidence of evolutionary change in invasive populations of Harmonia axyridis Pallas (Coccinellidae: Coleoptera). We measured egg defenses – cocktail of hydrocarbons on the egg’s surface flagging egg toxicity, and the concentration of the main alkaloid harmonine -...

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