174 Works

Data from: Within-range translocations and their consequences in European larch

Stefanie Wagner, Sascha Liepelt, Sophie Gerber & Rémy J. Petit
In contrast to biological invasions, translocations of individuals within a species range are understudied, due to difficulties in systematically detecting them. This results in limited knowledge about the corresponding processes and uncertainties regarding the status of extant populations. European larch, a forest tree whose fragmented native distribution is restricted to the Alps and to other Central European mountains, has been massively planted for at least 300 years. Here we focus on the genetic characterization of...

Data from: Adaptive admixture in the West African bovine hybrid zone: insight from the Borgou population

Laurence Flori, Sophie Thevenon, Guiguigbaza-Kossigan Dayo, Marcel Sénou, Souleymane Sylla, David Berthier, Katayou Moazami-Goudarzi, Mathieu Gautier & Katayoun Moazami-Goudarzi
Understanding the adaptive response to environmental fluctuations represents a central issue in evolutionary biology. Population admixture between divergent ancestries has often been considered as an efficient short-term adaptation strategy. Cattle populations from the West African Bos taurus x Bos indicus hybrid zone represent a valuable resource to characterize the effect of such adaptive admixture at the genome level. We here provide a detailed assessment of the global and local genome ancestries of the Borgou breed,...

Data from: Linking niche theory to ecological impacts of successful invaders: insights from resource fluctuation-specialist herbivore interactions

Cindy Gidoin, Lionel Roques & Thomas Boivin
1. Theories of species coexistence and invasion ecology are fundamentally connected and provide a common theoretical framework for studying the mechanisms underlying successful invasions and their ecological impacts. Temporal fluctuations in resource availability and differences in life-history traits between invasive and resident species are considered as likely drivers of the dynamics of invaded communities. Current critical issues in invasion ecology thus relate to the extent to which such mechanisms influence coexistence between invasive and resident...

Data from: Quantifying temporal isolation: a modelling approach assessing the effect of flowering time differences on crop-to-weed pollen flow in sunflower

Marie Roumet, Adeline Cayre, Muriel Latreille & Marie-Hélène Muller
Flowering time divergence can be a crucial component of reproductive isolation between sympatric populations but few studies have quantified its actual contribution to the reduction of gene flow. In this study, we aimed at estimating pollen-mediated gene flow between cultivated sunflower and a weedy conspecific sunflower population growing in the same field, and at quantifying how it is affected by the weeds’ flowering time. For that purpose, we extended an existing mating model by including...

Data from: Fitness cost due to herbicide resistance may trigger genetic background evolution

Henri Darmency, Yosra Menchari, Valérie Le Corre & Christophe Délye
This paper investigates the possible existence of mechanisms counterbalancing the negative pleiotropic effects on development and reproduction that are conferred by alleles responsible for herbicide resistance in the weed Alopecurus myosuroides. We considered three herbicide-resistant, mutant acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACCase) alleles: Leu1781, Asn2041 and Gly2078 found in eight resistant populations. Of these, Gly2078 is the only allele with a known fitness cost. We compared plants homozygous for wild-type ACCase alleles that were siblings of plants carrying...

Data from: Exotic invasive plants increase productivity, abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria, and nitrogen availability in intermountain grasslands

Morgan Luce McLeod, Cory C. Cleveland, Ylva Lekberg, John L. Maron, Laurent Philippot, David Bru & Ragan M. Callaway
1. Exotic plant invasion is often associated with dramatic increases in above-ground net primary productivity and soil nitrogen. However, most evidence for these increases comes from correlative studies of single species, leaving open the question of whether invasive plants drive these processes and if they are consistent among invaders. 2. We combined field surveys and measurements within experimental plantings to examine how plant productivity, soil nitrogen, and the abundance of ammonia-oxidizing bacteria (AOB) change in...

Data from: Familiarity to a feed additive modulates its effects on brain responses in reward and memory regions in the pig model

David Val-Laillet, Paul Meurice & Caroline Clouard
Brain responses to feed flavors with or without a feed additive (FA) were investigated in piglets familiarized or not with this FA. Sixteen piglets were allocated to 2 dietary treatments from weaning until d 37: the naive group (NAI) received a standard control feed and the familiarized group (FAM) received the same feed added with a FA mainly made of orange extracts. Animals were subjected to a feed transition at d 16 post-weaning, and to...

Data from: The population biology of fungal invasions

Pierre Gladieux, Alice Feurtey, Michael E. Hood, Alodie Snirc, Joanne Clavel, Cyril Dutech, Melanie Roy & Tatiana Giraud
Fungal invasions are increasingly recognized as a significant component of global changes, threatening ecosystem health and damaging food production. Invasive fungi also provide excellent models to evaluate the generality of results based on other eukaryotes. We first consider here the reasons why fungal invasions have long been overlooked: they tend to be inconspicuous, and inappropriate methods have been used for species recognition. We then review the information available on the patterns and mechanisms of fungal...

Data from: Heterozygote advantage at MHC DRB may influence response to infectious disease epizootics

Amy J. Osborne, John Pearson, Sandra S. Negro, B. Louise Chilvers, Martin A. Kennedy & Neil J. Gemmell
The effect of MHC polymorphism on individual fitness variation in the wild remains equivocal; however, much evidence suggests that heterozygote advantage is a major determinant. To understand the contribution of MHC polymorphism to individual disease resistance or susceptibility in natural populations, we investigated two MHC class II B loci, DQB and DRB, in the New Zealand sea lion (NZSL, Phocarctos hookeri). The NZSL is a threatened species which is unusually susceptible to death by bacterial...

Data from: The effects of climate change on a mega-diverse country: predicted shifts in mammalian species richness and turnover in continental Ecuador.

Paula Iturralde-Pólit, Olivier Dangles, Santiago F. Burneo & Christine N. Meynard
Ecuador is one of 17 nations with the greatest diversity in the world, sheltering lowland and mountain regions that are considered global biodiversity hotspots. While these regions are projected to be highly impacted by climate change, it is not clear what would be the consequences for faunal diversity and conservation. To address this issue, we used an ensemble of 8 species distribution models (SDM) to determine future shifts and identify areas of high changes in...

Data from: Stocking activities for the Arctic charr in Lake Geneva: genetic effects in space and time

Romain Savary, Christophe Dufresnes, Alexis Champigneulle, Arnaud Caudron, Sylvain Dubey, Nicolas Perrin & Luca Fumagalli
Artificial stocking practices are widely used by resource managers worldwide, in order to sustain fish populations exploited by both recreational and commercial activities, but their benefits are controversial. Former practices involved exotic strains, although current programs rather consider artificial breeding of local fishes (supportive breeding). Understanding the complex genetic effects of these management strategies is an important challenge with economic and conservation implications, especially in the context of population declines. In the present study, we...

Data from: Fear of the dark? contrasting impacts of humans vs lynx on diel activity of roe deer across Europe

Nadège C. Bonnot, Ophélie Couriot, Anne Berger, Francesca Cagnacci, Simone Ciuti, Johannes De Groeve, Benedikt Gehr, Marco Heurich, Petter Kjellander, Max Kröschel, Nicolas Morellet, Leif Sönnichsen & A.J. Mark Hewison
Humans, as super predators, can have strong effects on wildlife behaviour, including profound modifications of diel activity patterns. Subsequent to the return of large carnivores to human-modified ecosystems, many prey species have adjusted their spatial behaviour to the contrasting landscapes of fear generated by both their natural predators and anthropogenic pressures. The effects of predation risk on temporal shifts in diel activity of prey, however, remain largely unexplored in human-dominated landscapes. We investigated the influence...

Data from: Assessing the effects of quantitative host resistance on the life-history traits of sporulating parasites with growing lesions

Melen Leclerc, Julie Clément, Didier Andrivon & Frédéric Hamelin
Assessing life-history traits of parasites on resistant hosts is crucial in evolutionary ecology. In the particular case of sporulating pathogens with growing lesions, phenotyping is difficult because one needs to disentangle properly pathogen spread from sporulation. By considering Phytophthora infestans on potato, we use mathematical modelling to tackle this issue and refine the assessment pathogen response to quantitative host resistance. We elaborate a parsimonious leaf-scale model by convolving a lesion growth model and a sporulation...

Data from: Partitioning genetic and species diversity refines our understanding of species-genetic diversity relationships

Vera W Pfeiffer, Brett M Ford, Johann Housset, Audrey McCombs, José L Blanco-Pastor, Nicolas Gouin, Stephanie Manel & Angéline Bertin
Illuminating the origin of species-genetic diversity correlations (SGDCs) is a challenging task that has sparked a lot of interest. Genetic and species diversity are comprised by components that respond differently to the same ecological processes. Thus, it can be useful to partition species and genetic diversity into their different components to infer the mechanisms behind SGDCs. In this study, we applied such an approach using a high-elevation Andean wetland system, where previous evidence identified neutral...

Data from: Plasticity in leaf litter traits partly mitigates the impact of thinning on forest floor carbon cycling

Ludovic Henneron, Matthieu Chauvat, Frédéric Archaux, Marthe Akpa-Vinceslas, Fabrice Bureau, Yann Dumas, Francois Ningre, Claudine Richter, Philippe Balandier & Michael Aubert
1. Reducing stand density by thinning intensification has been emphasized as an efficient strategy of forest adaptation to climate change as it improves stand resistance to drought. Yet, it is still unclear how it could affect litter C cycling processes. Recent evidence indicates that the plasticity of an oak tree species can lead to a decline in its leaf litter quality and decomposability following thinning. The consequences for litter decomposition and forest floor C storage...

Data from: Species richness effects on grassland recovery from drought depend on community productivity in a multisite experiment

Juergen Kreyling, Jürgen Dengler, Julia Walter, Nikolay Velev, Emin Ugurlu, Desislava Sopotlieva, Johannes Ransijn, Catherine Picon-Cochard, Ivan Nijs, Pauline Hernandez, Behlül Güler, Philipp Von Gillhaussen, Hans J. De Boeck, Juliette M. G. Bloor, Sigi Berwaers, Carl Beierkuhnlein, Mohammed A. S. Arfin Khan, Iva Apostolova, Yasin Altan, Michaela Zeiter, Camilla Wellstein, Marcelo Sternberg, Andreas Stampfli, Giandiego Campetella, Sándor Bartha … & Juliette M.G. Bloor
Biodiversity can buffer ecosystem functioning against extreme climatic events, but few experiments have explicitly tested this. Here, we present the first multisite biodiversity × drought manipulation experiment to examine drought resistance and recovery at five temperate and Mediterranean grassland sites. Aboveground biomass production declined by 30% due to experimental drought (standardised local extremity by rainfall exclusion for 72–98 consecutive days). Species richness did not affect resistance but promoted recovery. Recovery was only positively affected by...

Data from: Extending the use of ecological models without sacrificing details: a generic and parsimonious meta-modelling approach

Guillaume Marie & Guillaume Simioni
Process-based models (PBMs, see table 1 for a list of abbreviations) are essential tools to assess ecosystem response to climate change, land use changes, extreme weather patterns, or other environmental disturbances. PBMs allow to deal with the high level of interactions and feedbacks which are intrinsic to ecological processes, but their complexity comes at the cost of computation time and memory. Because of that, there is a trade-off between the resolution satisfactory to describe ecological...

Data from: Root community traits along a land use gradient: evidence of a community-level economics spectrum

Iván Prieto, Catherine Roumet, Remi Cardinael, Christian Dupraz, Christophe Jourdan, John H. Kim, Jean Luc Maeght, Zhun Mao, Alain Pierret, Noelia Portillo, Olivier Roupsard, Chantanousone Thammahacksa & Alexia Stokes
1. There is a fundamental trade-off between leaf traits associated with either resource acquisition or resource conservation. This gradient of trait variation, called the economics spectrum also applies to fine roots but whether it is consistent for coarse roots or at the plant community level remains untested. 2. We measured a set of morphological and chemical root traits at a community level (functional parameters; FP) in 20 plant communities located along land-use intensity gradients and...

Data from: Patterns of selection on Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte binding antigens after the colonisation of the New World

Erhan Yalcindag, Virginie Rougeron, Eric Elguero, Céline Arnathau, Patrick Durand, Sylvain Brisse, Laure Diancourt, Agnes Aubouy, Pierre Becquart, Umberto D'Alessandro, Didier Fontenille, Dionicia Gamboa, Amanda Maestre, Didier Ménard, Lise Musset, Oscar Noya, Vincent Veron, Albina Wide, Bernard Carme, Eric Legrand, Christine Chevillon, Francisco J. Ayala, François Renaud & Franck Prugnolle
Pathogens, which have recently colonized a new host species or new populations of the same host, are interesting models for understanding how populations may evolve in response to novel environments. During its colonization of South America from Africa Plasmodium falciparum, the main agent of malaria, has been exposed to new conditions in distinctive new human populations (Amerindian and populations of mixed origins), that likely exerted new selective pressures on the parasite's genome. Among the genes...

Data from: Phenotypic and genotypic convergences are influenced by historical contingency and environment in yeast

Aymé Spor, Daniel J. Kvitek, Thibault Nidelet, Juliette Martin, Judith Legrand, Christine Dillmann, Aurélie Bourgais, Dominique De Vienne, Gavin Sherlock & Delphine Sicard
Different organisms have independently and recurrently evolved similar phenotypic traits at different points throughout history. This phenotypic convergence may be caused by genotypic convergence and in addition, constrained by historical contingency. To investigate how convergence may be driven by selection in a particular environment and constrained by history, we analyzed nine life-history traits and four metabolic traits during an experimental evolution of six yeast strains in four different environments. In each of the environments, the...

Data from: Unveiling the diet of elusive rainforest herbivores in next generation sequencing era? The tapir as a case study

Fabrice Hibert, Pierre Taberlet, Jérôme Chave, Caroline Scotti-Saintagne, Daniel Sabatier & Cécile Richard-Hansen
Characterizing the trophic relationships between large herbivores and the outstanding plant diversity in rainforest is a major challenge because of their elusiveness. This is crucial to understand the role of these herbivores in the functioning of the rainforest ecosystems. We tested a non-invasive approach based on the high-throughput sequencing of environmental samples using small plant plastid sequences (the trnL P6 loop) and ribosomal ITS1 primers, referred to as DNA metabarcoding, to investigate the diet of...

Data from: Phylogenetic affiliation of SSU rRNA genes generated by massively parallel sequencing: new insights into the freshwater protist diversity

Najwa Taib, Jean-François Mangot, Isabelle Domaizon, Gisèle Bronner & Didier Debroas
Recent advances in next-generation sequencing (NGS) technologies spur progress in determining the microbial diversity in various ecosystems by highlighting, for example, the rare biosphere. Currently, high-throughput pyrotag sequencing of PCR-amplified SSU rRNA gene regions is mainly used to characterize bacterial and archaeal communities, and rarely to characterize protist communities. In addition, although taxonomic assessment through phylogeny is considered as the most robust approach, similarity and probabilistic approaches remain the most commonly used for taxonomic affiliation....

Data from: Genetic signature of a range expansion and leap-frog event after the recent invasion of Europe by the grapevine downy mildew pathogen Plasmopara viticola

Michael C. Fontaine, Frederic Austerlitz, Tatiana Giraud, Frederic Labbé, Daciana Papura, Sylvie Richard-Cervera & Francois Delmotte
Biologic invasions can have important ecological, economic and social consequences, particularly when they involve the introduction and spread of plant invasive pathogens, as they can threaten natural ecosystems and jeopardize the production of human food. Examples include the grapevine downy mildew, caused by the oomycete Plasmopara viticola, an invasive species native to North America, introduced into Europe in the 1870s. We investigated the introduction and spread of this invasive pathogen, by analysing its genetic structure...

Data from: Melanin-based coloration of sneaker male Atlantic salmon is linked to viability and emergence timing of their offspring

Lucas Marie-Orleach, Jean-Marc Roussel, Jérôme Bugeon, Julien Tremblay, Dominique Ombredane & Guillaume Evanno
The ‘good genes’ hypothesis of sexual selection predicts that male ornaments are favoured by female mate choice because male ornament reveals genetic quality. In species with different male reproductive tactics, variation in genetic quality among ‘sneaking’ males has rarely been investigated, as usually ‘sneakers’ are thought not to be chosen by females. Here we focused on the alternative reproductive tactic in Atlantic salmon (Salmo salar Linnaeus, 1758) to test whether the skin colour of sneakers...

Data from: Leaf drought tolerance cannot be inferred from classic leaf traits in a tropical rainforest

Isabelle Maréchaux, Laurent Saint-André, Megan K. Bartlett, Lawren Sack & Jérôme Chave
Plants are enormously diverse in their traits and ecological adaptation, even within given ecosystems, such as tropical rainforests. Accounting for this diversity in vegetation models poses serious challenges. Global plant functional trait databases have highlighted general trait correlations across species that have considerably advanced this research program. However, it remains unclear whether trait correlations found globally hold within communities, and whether they extend to drought tolerance traits. For 134 individual plants spanning a range of...

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